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aperhapshand

Member Since 13 Jun 2012
Offline Last Active Jul 27 2014 07:54 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Using magnets to organize handtools

05 December 2012 - 08:13 PM

brilliant. thank you for sharing!

In Topic: Building a Downdraft Barrel Kiln

16 September 2012 - 12:16 PM

great aperhapshand!...was it the contact with the animal bedding that gave the black? could you tell what had done what?

got a batch of terra sig #2 from the book settling, and some copper carb to sprinkle

i like high contrast mostly, so i will be looking for some black blacks and minimal effects on other parts

really wondering how this will be for bigger pieces, like ones i can barely squeeze in there!


I don't think the animal bedding gave the blacks per say. The animal bedding is really all over everything.

I have done a few raw firings in my outdoor fireplace (behind the barrel kiln – it is cast iron and get pretty hot when it gets going.) I have never had an issue getting blacks – and it has never been an all-over black – totally smoked in some areas while white in others. I was hoping to get more color – I am planning on trying the miracle grow in the next go round.




I do think having the pieces nestled really close to each other helped vary the patterns from the smoke. - the pieces that were a bit looser “on their own” were mostly black/grey with little white




This is how we loaded it.

a layer of the animal bedding over the grate – a layer of pieces – the newspaper “wicks” crisscrossed –

sprinkled iron oxides and epsom salts – (think the salts helped with some speckling of whites) - more bedding more pieces – oxides / salts – bedding – thin(ish) fire wood and scrap wood that was soaked in lighter fluid – (very carefully) pushed vertically down to nestle into the work/bedding and a pile on top that was lit.




We let it burn for about 45 min before putting the lid on – in the future I think I would let it burn without the lid on for a little bit longer -




the lid was off of the top held up by some rocks –don't do this by yourself – it was a little cumbersome with 2 people but it would have been straight up dangerous on my own.







I hadn't really planned for this firing so nothing had terra sig on it. the lidded vessel was burnished in some areas.

the jar was in a tin foil saggar with chemically dyed human hair




Oh and I had several different clay bodies – there was stoneware, low fire - white, terra cotta and a raku body

I like the result of the low fire white the best – that gave me the biggest contrast and the most pattern.

The groggy raku body I used was really grey and blah

the terra cotta was nice but wasn't as stunning as the white

I didn't loose any work – no cracking or breaking




Please let me know how you do yours and the results you get! Good luck!


In Topic: Building a Downdraft Barrel Kiln

16 September 2012 - 12:16 PM

great aperhapshand!...was it the contact with the animal bedding that gave the black? could you tell what had done what?

got a batch of terra sig #2 from the book settling, and some copper carb to sprinkle

i like high contrast mostly, so i will be looking for some black blacks and minimal effects on other parts

really wondering how this will be for bigger pieces, like ones i can barely squeeze in there!


I don't think the animal bedding gave the blacks per say. The animal bedding is really all over everything.

I have done a few raw firings in my outdoor fireplace (behind the barrel kiln – it is cast iron and get pretty hot when it gets going.) I have never had an issue getting blacks – and it has never been an all-over black – totally smoked in some areas while white in others. I was hoping to get more color – I am planning on trying the miracle grow in the next go round.




I do think having the pieces nestled really close to each other helped vary the patterns from the smoke. - the pieces that were a bit looser “on their own” were mostly black/grey with little white




This is how we loaded it.

a layer of the animal bedding over the grate – a layer of pieces – the newspaper “wicks” crisscrossed –

sprinkled iron oxides and epsom salts – (think the salts helped with some speckling of whites) - more bedding more pieces – oxides / salts – bedding – thin(ish) fire wood and scrap wood that was soaked in lighter fluid – (very carefully) pushed vertically down to nestle into the work/bedding and a pile on top that was lit.




We let it burn for about 45 min before putting the lid on – in the future I think I would let it burn without the lid on for a little bit longer -




the lid was off of the top held up by some rocks –don't do this by yourself – it was a little cumbersome with 2 people but it would have been straight up dangerous on my own.







I hadn't really planned for this firing so nothing had terra sig on it. the lidded vessel was burnished in some areas.

the jar was in a tin foil saggar with chemically dyed human hair




Oh and I had several different clay bodies – there was stoneware, low fire - white, terra cotta and a raku body

I like the result of the low fire white the best – that gave me the biggest contrast and the most pattern.

The groggy raku body I used was really grey and blah

the terra cotta was nice but wasn't as stunning as the white

I didn't loose any work – no cracking or breaking




Please let me know how you do yours and the results you get! Good luck!


In Topic: Building a Downdraft Barrel Kiln

15 September 2012 - 10:38 PM

My husband and I built one recently - we only did one firing so far but it turned out pretty well. We used that same book and I scoured the internet for resources. There wasn't too much but then again it wasn't too hard.

We made it with whatever we could find for free / cheap - We used a few aluminum foil saggars which turned out pretty nice. I didn't get a ton of color (mostly blacks and grey a little orangish) but it began to rain near the end so I think that caused the temp to drop.

I plan on posting more about this form of firing when I have some time
I will let you know how my next firing goes.

http://aperhapshand....om/?page_id=144

We used animal bedding and I suggest throwing a few briquets in for nice hot spots.

In Topic: Teaching Ceramics to Adults

28 June 2012 - 04:18 PM

I have taught pottery for almost 5 years now at a local art center. Hand-building and wheel throwingI started teaching when I was 23 so the adult classes were always intimidating. It didn't help that I look(ed) much younger Posted Image
So when structuring the class and writing up the syllabus I created the class that I would have wanted when first began. Our terms are broken up into 10 week sessions (2 hrs once a week) so like many of the other responses here I asked what the students goals were the first day and always adjust accordingly.



90% of the time the first 2 weeks I cover basic techniques - wedging, scoring, pinch pots, slabs, coils, etc and do wheel demos.
I (try) to incorporate as many techniques into 2 or 3 loosely structured projects to let students understand what clay allows and what it doesn't - this also helps get the ball rolling
one of my favorite projects is a "monster pot" that starts as a pinch pot and uses coils/slabs/slip trailing.


After that I have the students bring in drawings or picture cutout of things they are interested in and build from there
- I do the same thing as Pres and when showing a technique let everyone know so if they are interested they can watch.


I keep a binder of projects (some are actual tutorials/instructions most are pictures of pottery) for students to browse if they are uninspired or want to try something different.

Most of my student have had little experience with clay and I encourage the hell out of them.
Some want tangible objects to take home while others are fine with only learning the process. I encourage quality over quantity but allow the student standards to dictate this (this is the hardest to stick with since I am a throw it out person)

When I have more experienced potters I like to push them and often give them homework - look this or that artist/technique up and give much more extensive critiques.

I encourage all my students to watch me load the kiln and give them a taste the non building aspect of ceramics as well.
My husband recently built me a stovepipe barrel kiln so i am sure my students will be over at my house soon learning with me about that!

The classes are never more than 6 students so I have the luxury of adjusting to the students.