Jump to content


terraforma

Member Since 02 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Nov 23 2016 05:39 AM
-----

Topics I've Started

Advice On Firing My L&l E23T To Cone 10?

07 November 2016 - 09:13 PM

I have a new-ish L&L E23T kiln with 3" brick; one of the reasons I chose it was its ability to fire to cone 10. Now it seems that I might want to actually start to do that once in a while—I will mostly use it for bisque and cone 5/6.

The motivation to do this is that since I left my last membership studio, I had a small load of cone 10 work gas fired at a friends studio, where I can also use her glazes. Despite the very reasonable $.05 per cu. inch cost, this load cost me $72—more than what two full kiln loads would cost in my electric kiln, and almost double what the friend said it cost in gas for one firing in her kiln! Obviously, that is not sustainable.

I know I can't achieve the things I could with cone 10 reduction, but I will limit the firings to what will be happy in oxidation—matte and gloss white, matte black, crawl glaze, and Heino and/or Laguna turquoise.

Any advice or words of wisdom about cone 10 electric firing? I'm very new to doing my own firing. I've included a pic of the spectacular Heino glaze from that last gas firing mentioned above; if I could anything close to this in electric oxidation I'd be a very happy potter!

Are Cone 5/6 Ceramics Correctly Referred To As "stoneware"?

29 August 2016 - 12:03 PM

Now that I have my own studio and electric kiln, I'm moving from cone 10 clays to cone 5. This new world of mid-range clays, glazes, and firing is like starting all over again.

 

I'm uncertain about whether cone 5/6 ceramics are correctly referred to as stoneware. Pretty sure that the term "earthenware" refers to low-fire ceramics, but I await the wisdom of those who know better about these things. :-)


Recommendations For Levelling A New Kiln Installation?

26 April 2016 - 05:42 PM

I'm getting a new L&L Kiln in just a few days, and it will be installed in a room with a sloping (concrete) floor. The rep at L&L told me to use "metal shims" to level the kiln, but a quick google search doesn't seem to come up with metal shims for this purpose; there are very expensive options for precision situations like machinery, engines, etc. Now it's after hours for L&L, and I'm feeling desperate. Obviously, I can't use wood shims. If there's a very serious difference, can I use concrete pavers as part of the shimming? Just realized how dumb it is that L&L doesn't have leveling feet. :wacko:

 

I'd love to hear how others have shimmed up and leveled their kilns, or anyone who has a clever idea. Thanks!


Recommendations For Los Angeles-Area Electrician With Kiln Experience?

22 March 2016 - 01:00 PM

I live in Los Angeles, I've just started renting my very own studio in a commercial space, and I need to find an electrician to do some upgrades to include installation of a new electric kiln (either Skutt or L&L, my first kiln, and I've never even fired a kiln yet!!)

 

I've already heard and read more about the myriad nightmares that can come from a bad electrical job than is good for my mental health. Even done by a licensed electrician, when they don't understand the extreme requirements of a kiln! (has anyone seen the instagram pics of @lyonclay's kiln meltdown?) I plan to avoid that from the start if I possibly can :) :) Whoever does this work will be getting a strict lecture from me about taking no shortcuts and following the manufacturer's specs and installation instructions TO. THE. LETTER. but it will be more of a comfort to know that the one I hire will have done this at least once before—successfully!

 

Thank you for any and all recommendations and advice!