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Mishima


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#1 Julie

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Posted 02 May 2011 - 08:27 PM

wonder if slip needs to be used for mishima or just oxides works well.
thanks for replies

#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 07:13 AM

Slip. It is inlayed slip.

#3 Julie

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 01:42 PM

wonder if slip needs to be used for mishima or just oxides works well.
thanks for replies

Marcia, I am not understanding your reply. How do I get into American Potters to view.

#4 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 08:20 PM

Julie,
Mishima is a technique of inlaying slip into incised markings. Using oxides rather than slip would not be Mishima.
Use slip after incising a pattern. Scrape the surface to clean the edges.

AmericanPotters.com has nothing to do with Mishima.
Marcia

#5 Julie

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 08:38 PM

ok, using a slip. Can anyone let me know what they are finding the best way to remove slip after filling in . that doesn't leave color residue on white clay surface. Thanks. looking for tips on this process.

#6 Julie

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 08:40 PM

Julie,
Mishima is a technique of inlaying slip into incised markings. Using oxides rather than slip would not be Mishima.
Use slip after incising a pattern. Scrape the surface to clean the edges.

AmericanPotters.com has nothing to do with Mishima.
Marcia

That link was in your reply.

#7 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 06:22 AM

that link is under my signature along with other personal websites.
Marcia

To remove the slip you and use a metal rib to scrape away the slip and then sand. If you google Mishima you will find explanations.
Marcia

#8 Chris Campbell

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 09:44 AM

You usually have to apply a couple layers of slip as it shrinks when it dries.
Let it dry completely, then either scrape it off with a rib or sand it off if there is only a bit.
Afterwards you can smooth over the area with a damp natural sponge.
This will remove any residual marks or colors on the white.

Take your time with this process to get the best results.
It is a fairly easy process, but you need to take the time to let each layer dry.

I have images on my website ... Go to " tutorials " then look under 'how to work with slips'.
Scroll down and you will find images of the process on a tile.

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#9 Julie

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 02:42 PM

You usually have to apply a couple layers of slip as it shrinks when it dries.
Let it dry completely, then either scrape it off with a rib or sand it off if there is only a bit.
Afterwards you can smooth over the area with a damp natural sponge.
This will remove any residual marks or colors on the white.

Take your time with this process to get the best results.
It is a fairly easy process, but you need to take the time to let each layer dry.

I have images on my website ... Go to " tutorials " then look under 'how to work with slips'.
Scroll down and you will find images of the process on a tile.



thank you Chris!

#10 JBaymore

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Posted 06 May 2011 - 03:15 PM

I actually use a different technique for removing the brushed on slip layer and leaving the inlay.

Many years ago, Shimaoka-sensei showed me that if you catch the slip and underlying clay surface at just the correct leather hardness, AND use a very sharp tool to shave the surface down, it makes for pretty precise and clean removal of the slip layer.

Too wet and things smear. Too dry and you get unnecessary dust to deal with.

Any remaining stuff can be carefully sanded off when dry,........ but there usually is not much to touch up, if anything.

YMMV.


best,

.............john
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#11 terraforma

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Posted 07 May 2011 - 10:15 PM

Julie,

Just to add to John's thorough reply, I found that, after testing at many different points of leather-hardness, the ideal time seems to be when the shavings come off like curls, rather than clumping up, sticking to the scraper, and smearing (too moist), or crumbling (too dry). It's a good trial-and-error exercise for experience. I found the ideal angle of scraping rib to pottery was at nearly 90 degrees. When bone dry, 0000 steel wool (very fine) is good for touch-ups.

Hope this helps.

Mickey
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#12 Julie

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Posted 07 May 2011 - 10:28 PM

Julie,

Just to add to John's thorough reply, I found that, after testing at many different points of leather-hardness, the ideal time seems to be when the shavings come off like curls, rather than clumping up, sticking to the scraper, and smearing (too moist), or crumbling (too dry). It's a good trial-and-error exercise for experience. I found the ideal angle of scraping rib to pottery was at nearly 90 degrees. When bone dry, 0000 steel wool (very fine) is good for touch-ups.

Hope this helps.

Mickey



thanks Mickey. as i have been working on it, I am finding the right dryness seems to be key. I am not getting the slip to come off like curls, ( i thot it might by the looks of the dryness) must have been TOO dry. timing is everything :) thanks again

#13 JBaymore

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Posted 07 May 2011 - 10:33 PM

The key point I was making was that in my case it is "shaved", not scraped. Very thin sheets are cut off with a very sharp tool. I use a Japanese kanna trimming tool. And I sharpen them frequently when working. The angle between the cutting blade and the surface of the piece is very shallow and the pressure is light.

best,

...............john
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Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#14 terraforma

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Posted 15 May 2011 - 08:34 PM

Thanks, John. I have heard this before and haven't tried shaving versus scraping yet, because, as you point out, I don't have the proper tool that is sharp enough and can be used at an angle. Knowing this, I haven't dared to even try shaving for fear of simply messing up the design. I really must look for one of the Japanese tools that you use, and learn to sharpen it properly! I would love to see a live demonstration of the shaving technique.

Mickey
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Terraforma Studio
Los Angeles, CA

#15 JBaymore

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Posted 15 May 2011 - 09:03 PM

Mickey,

I get mine in Japan.... but here is a place to get pretty good ones here in the USA: http://www.japanpotterytools.com/

best,

...................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#16 Deanna@AtlantaClay

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 12:30 PM

Julie - I have used a metal rib - a kemper S3 or S4 with good results as well - as long as everything is leatherhard you can scrape with a swift motion and not get colored slip on the white clay.

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#17 Karma Earl

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 03:54 PM

wonder if slip needs to be used for mishima or just oxides works well.
thanks for replies


I have been using black mountain and a similar shrink rate(coronado white) slip for mishima. I found sanding paper too abrasive. Tulle works great on dry pots.
If you don't know what that is, find a prom queen.
Best wishes,

Karma


#18 Julie

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 05:44 PM

Julie - I have used a metal rib - a kemper S3 or S4 with good results as well - as long as everything is leatherhard you can scrape with a swift motion and not get colored slip on the white clay.

Deanna


thanks Deanna! I will ck it out. where is Atlanta Clay located in ATl? I am moving there soon...looking for work
www.workinclay.com




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