Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
kecpotter

Add Water To Brushing Glaze So Can Use For Pouring?

Recommended Posts

Hi, I recently purchased some cone 5 brushing glazes (my experience is all about making cone 10 glazes from scratch and pouring them), and it turns out I really don't like brushing! Can I add water to them and use them for pouring and dipping, or are there other ingredients that would need to change, too? Thanks in advance, K

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've done it for turning a brushing glaze to a dipping glaze so I'm sure it would work if you got the correct consistency. One sure way to find out huh? BTW I use a osmosis filter water on any glaze I thin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thin glazes with distilled water. For pouring, I like a consistancy of heavy cream. Add a little water at a time. Test by dipping your finger in it. If it thinly coats your nail it's about right. Try some test tiles with three dips, staggering the dips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, I recently purchased some cone 5 brushing glazes (my experience is all about making cone 10 glazes from scratch and pouring them), and it turns out I really don't like brushing! Can I add water to them and use them for pouring and dipping, or are there other ingredients that would need to change, too? Thanks in advance, K

 

 

 

 

 

A wonderful thing about brushing is control of application. I have found no need for dry footing or waxing. I use fully loaded big mop brushes or a sky washes depending upon the effects I am going for. I add water now and then especially to long standing brushing glazes for glazing interiors of vessels; however I only use a small amount of water so I will not change the coefficiency of the formula.

 

I recommend that you test before making any major changes to a commercial glaze. Take a small quantity of the glaze, add a meager amount of water to it and pour it on a test sampler and let it dry. Is it too thin or still too thick? Make your adjustments accordingly. If you thin out the glaze only do it in small batches so that you can add more of the original glaze to the mix, if necessary.

 

If you add too much water to the glaze the heavy particles will sink to the bottom of the container and will require constant stirring while in use. If the glaze is allowed to settle trying to mix the glaze may pose a real problem a hard block may form and getting it into suspension again may take a bit of work with glaze mixers, siphons, etc…, then you may lose some of your soluble minerals. All this to say be stingy when adding water to commercial glazes.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.