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JBaymore

Help With Eyeglasses In The Studio

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JBaymore    1,432

Hi all. Not sure if this is exactly the correct place for this.

 

I have been having a little problem for a number of years and I am wondering if this issue affects others also.... and how they have (or have not) solved it.

 

I am basically blind as a bat... and have worn glasses since I was a really young child. As I have ...... ahem.... "matured" wink.gif I not only cannot see at a distance but also now can't see close up. So I am always wearing one or another pair of glasses in the studio. For many years I have used the ultra-thin high impact poly-carbonate plastic lenses due to the thickness of my typical prescription and also since they are effectively "safety glasses" also.

 

I have a nice set of bi-focal "reading" glasses that I have had made up that I now use in the studio a lot of the time. I had the optometrist set the focal distance for the upper part for the distance to my wheelhead and the lower part for a closer in distance that fits my handbuilding and decorating needs. This works really great for me.

 

The problem here is that I find that both the distance and the "reading" glasses consistently get scratched all to heck in only about a year's time. I have tried every "scratch resistant coating" that Pearle Vision has available ....to no avail. In fact, the difference between a lens with scratch coating and one without does not seem to make a difference to this.

 

I am ASSUMING here that the issue is realted to the abrasive qualities of ceramic dusts I am exposed to.... but it is also possible that is NOT the genesis of this issue. But I THINK it must be.

 

I'm not exactly "Pigpen" in the studio... as my college students can attest.... being the "health and safety" nut on campus (many years as the chair of the college Health and Safety Committee). My home studio is kept pretty darn clean compared to all too many I have seen. I have local pickup ventilation for the major dust making operations, general duilution ventilation, and a ceiling mounted HEPA filter unit (for only when I think it might really be needed). I am constantly conscious of dust making activities...and try to minimize them.

 

When I clean my glasses, I typically rinse them off under clean running water before I do any "wiping" of them with a tissue or a cloth. I am very "conscious of the whole eyeglass issue... and try to make sure that I am not grinding excessive clay dust into the lens. In fact I typically cannot "see" any obvious dust sitting on the lenses when I clean them about 95% of the time. But still it keeps happening.

 

Is this just a "cost of doing business" and others are experienceing this same problem also. Or is it a Pearle Vision lens quality issue...and I should shift to another company's product? (My optometerist is located next door to Pearle Vision....conveninet.)

 

I REALLY do not want to have to go back to the heavier "glass" lenses (they did not exhibit this issue). But these glasses are expensive to keep replacing!!!!!

 

So I am very curious if it is just me or if other eyeglass wearers are finding the same kind of thing. Thanks.

 

 

best,

 

.........................john

 

PS: Shifting to contacts is not an option...... perscription issues as well as highly sensitive eyes.

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I have been wearing glasses since I was 8 years old. In my experience, a big box retailer like D.O.C. (now Pearle) just cannot compete with the quality of my local eyeglasses company. Like you, I tried not one but two pairs of glasses from D.O.C. and Lenscrafters and had the same problem: after 8-12 months worth of use, the coating is either scratched or in one case it actually started flaking off. For the past 3 years I've been using a local place who does a great job with fit, and I've never had a problem with scratched coating. I'm actually still wearing the first pair they made; they have a couple of light surface scratches but they are undetectable on which is pretty impressive considering I wore them every day for about 18 months. It's been nice having more than one pair with a correct prescription AND that still look good.

 

To make a long story longer (!), I would definitely try a small business next time. If you explain the trouble you've been having, they will probably be able to recommend an appropriate coating. I myself just get the "standard" non-glare which has enough scratch resistance for my needs. I actually save money over D.O.C./Lenscrafters too.

 

Good luck!

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MuddyMomma    0

i've had the same problem for years. the coatings come off quickly, they get scratched no matter how careful you are. the problem has gotten better since i started to NEVER clean my glasses unless there's running water somewhere and preferably soap. i rinse them well and get my hand all soapy and scrub them up under the water. i always use a clean cloth to dry or in a pinch the inside of my tshirt w/ the idea that dirt is less likely to be on the inside of my shirt. (cloth baby diapers work great too) the last few years i've started getting my glasses at costco. they have a 1yr guarantee and will replace your lenses if scratched. so when my year is almost up i take them in for a replacement. only drawback is that you have to have a 2nd pair to wear while the lenses are being replaced in the 1st pair. i'm going on 3yrs on the same pair of glasses and i can live w/ that. if you find another solution i'd love to hear it, i thought i was the only one lol!

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Lucy    0

Right now I can get away with cheap reading glasses in the studio and I never wear my plastic-lens, expensive glasses while working with clay. You might try having a "good-enough" pair you use strictly in the studio and another pair for the rest of your life, with the good pair hopefully lasting longer.

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sad duck    0

Hi all. Not sure if this is exactly the correct place for this.

 

I have been having a little problem for a number of years and I am wondering if this issue affects others also.... and how they have (or have not) solved it.

 

I am basically blind as a bat... and have worn glasses since I was a really young child. As I have ...... ahem.... "matured" wink.gif I not only cannot see at a distance but also now can't see close up. So I am always wearing one or another pair of glasses in the studio. For many years I have used the ultra-thin high impact poly-carbonate plastic lenses due to the thickness of my typical prescription and also since they are effectively "safety glasses" also.

 

I have a nice set of bi-focal "reading" glasses that I have had made up that I now use in the studio a lot of the time. I had the optometrist set the focal distance for the upper part for the distance to my wheelhead and the lower part for a closer in distance that fits my handbuilding and decorating needs. This works really great for me.

 

The problem here is that I find that both the distance and the "reading" glasses consistently get scratched all to heck in only about a year's time. I have tried every "scratch resistant coating" that Pearle Vision has available ....to no avail. In fact, the difference between a lens with scratch coating and one without does not seem to make a difference to this.

 

I am ASSUMING here that the issue is realted to the abrasive qualities of ceramic dusts I am exposed to.... but it is also possible that is NOT the genesis of this issue. But I THINK it must be.

 

I'm not exactly "Pigpen" in the studio... as my college students can attest.... being the "health and safety" nut on campus (many years as the chair of the college Health and Safety Committee). My home studio is kept pretty darn clean compared to all too many I have seen. I have local pickup ventilation for the major dust making operations, general duilution ventilation, and a ceiling mounted HEPA filter unit (for only when I think it might really be needed). I am constantly conscious of dust making activities...and try to minimize them.

 

When I clean my glasses, I typically rinse them off under clean running water before I do any "wiping" of them with a tissue or a cloth. I am very "conscious of the whole eyeglass issue... and try to make sure that I am not grinding excessive clay dust into the lens. In fact I typically cannot "see" any obvious dust sitting on the lenses when I clean them about 95% of the time. But still it keeps happening.

 

Is this just a "cost of doing business" and others are experienceing this same problem also. Or is it a Pearle Vision lens quality issue...and I should shift to another company's product? (My optometerist is located next door to Pearle Vision....conveninet.)

 

I REALLY do not want to have to go back to the heavier "glass" lenses (they did not exhibit this issue). But these glasses are expensive to keep replacing!!!!!

 

So I am very curious if it is just me or if other eyeglass wearers are finding the same kind of thing. Thanks.

 

 

best,

 

.........................john

 

PS: Shifting to contacts is not an option...... perscription issues as well as highly sensitive eyes.

[/quo

I wear glasses all the time for years and I do not have that trouble so it must be Pearls vision. I use a indepentant eye glass co. I just wash them off with water before I use a cleaner from wal-mart on them. Mine are not glass just too heavy, also I had trouble with the coating that they put on so I just don't put that on, it would scrach right away. Hope this helps, Sad Duck

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Paul    0

I susbcribe to the 'soapy finger' method of eyeglass cleaning...rinsing the dust off first and then a drop of liquid detergent on each lens. Also, my wife hooked me up with an eyeglass cleaning cloth that is very absorbent and ultra soft, probably from one of the big box drug stores.

 

This is definitely the place to ask this question. I'll be hovering back to read other suggestions. Thanks for stepping up with a great/practical question.

 

P:)

 

 

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swanlab    0

Ditto to having worn eyeglasses forever and having had the same scratched lens issue in the past. I have had the coating removed once scratched, albeit the opticians don't want or guarantee the results, but I have found that usually the scratches are just on the surface, and once the coating is gone, so are most of the scratches. But since learning that the "proper" way to clean my lenses are with a run under water, then spray with lens cleaner or a solution of 90proof rubbing alcohol and water, and finishing off with a lens cloth (microfiber, really soft - I buy the Costco cleaning kits - you get a cloth, two bottles of cleaner, travel spray and other stuff and unlimited free refills! for about $6) - I have had no scratching in over a year. I am in the school studio with teenagers everyday and they send clay and dust flying frequently.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Barb

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JBaymore    1,432

Thanks everyone for the feedback and suggestions. Glad to know I am not alone with the issue. And looks like I'll be trying someone other than Pearle Vision (or Lenscrafters) for the next set of glasses.

 

best,

 

....................john

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Pres    896

Hi all. Not sure if this is exactly the correct place for this.

 

I have been having a little problem for a number of years and I am wondering if this issue affects others also.... and how they have (or have not) solved it.

 

I am basically blind as a bat... and have worn glasses since I was a really young child. As I have ...... ahem.... "matured" wink.gif I not only cannot see at a distance but also now can't see close up. So I am always wearing one or another pair of glasses in the studio. For many years I have used the ultra-thin high impact poly-carbonate plastic lenses due to the thickness of my typical prescription and also since they are effectively "safety glasses" also.

 

I have a nice set of bi-focal "reading" glasses that I have had made up that I now use in the studio a lot of the time. I had the optometrist set the focal distance for the upper part for the distance to my wheelhead and the lower part for a closer in distance that fits my handbuilding and decorating needs. This works really great for me.

 

The problem here is that I find that both the distance and the "reading" glasses consistently get scratched all to heck in only about a year's time. I have tried every "scratch resistant coating" that Pearle Vision has available ....to no avail. In fact, the difference between a lens with scratch coating and one without does not seem to make a difference to this.

 

I am ASSUMING here that the issue is realted to the abrasive qualities of ceramic dusts I am exposed to.... but it is also possible that is NOT the genesis of this issue. But I THINK it must be.

 

I'm not exactly "Pigpen" in the studio... as my college students can attest.... being the "health and safety" nut on campus (many years as the chair of the college Health and Safety Committee). My home studio is kept pretty darn clean compared to all too many I have seen. I have local pickup ventilation for the major dust making operations, general duilution ventilation, and a ceiling mounted HEPA filter unit (for only when I think it might really be needed). I am constantly conscious of dust making activities...and try to minimize them.

 

When I clean my glasses, I typically rinse them off under clean running water before I do any "wiping" of them with a tissue or a cloth. I am very "conscious of the whole eyeglass issue... and try to make sure that I am not grinding excessive clay dust into the lens. In fact I typically cannot "see" any obvious dust sitting on the lenses when I clean them about 95% of the time. But still it keeps happening.

 

Is this just a "cost of doing business" and others are experienceing this same problem also. Or is it a Pearle Vision lens quality issue...and I should shift to another company's product? (My optometerist is located next door to Pearle Vision....conveninet.)

 

I REALLY do not want to have to go back to the heavier "glass" lenses (they did not exhibit this issue). But these glasses are expensive to keep replacing!!!!!

 

So I am very curious if it is just me or if other eyeglass wearers are finding the same kind of thing. Thanks.

 

 

best,

 

.........................john

 

PS: Shifting to contacts is not an option...... perscription issues as well as highly sensitive eyes.

 

 

 

I know your pain here, as I have used plastic lenses for years, and they would only last a year for set of lenses. My prescription is heavy, and so glass is not an option. My best solution over the last few years has been to rinse in water the lenses every so often, don't wipe when in the studio, just let them dry on your face. It worked the best for me.

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Terri    0

Hi all. Not sure if this is exactly the correct place for this.

 

I have been having a little problem for a number of years and I am wondering if this issue affects others also.... and how they have (or have not) solved it.

 

I am basically blind as a bat... and have worn glasses since I was a really young child. As I have ...... ahem.... "matured" wink.gif I not only cannot see at a distance but also now can't see close up. So I am always wearing one or another pair of glasses in the studio. For many years I have used the ultra-thin high impact poly-carbonate plastic lenses due to the thickness of my typical prescription and also since they are effectively "safety glasses" also.

 

I have a nice set of bi-focal "reading" glasses that I have had made up that I now use in the studio a lot of the time. I had the optometrist set the focal distance for the upper part for the distance to my wheelhead and the lower part for a closer in distance that fits my handbuilding and decorating needs. This works really great for me.

 

The problem here is that I find that both the distance and the "reading" glasses consistently get scratched all to heck in only about a year's time. I have tried every "scratch resistant coating" that Pearle Vision has available ....to no avail. In fact, the difference between a lens with scratch coating and one without does not seem to make a difference to this.

 

I am ASSUMING here that the issue is realted to the abrasive qualities of ceramic dusts I am exposed to.... but it is also possible that is NOT the genesis of this issue. But I THINK it must be.

 

I'm not exactly "Pigpen" in the studio... as my college students can attest.... being the "health and safety" nut on campus (many years as the chair of the college Health and Safety Committee). My home studio is kept pretty darn clean compared to all too many I have seen. I have local pickup ventilation for the major dust making operations, general duilution ventilation, and a ceiling mounted HEPA filter unit (for only when I think it might really be needed). I am constantly conscious of dust making activities...and try to minimize them.

 

When I clean my glasses, I typically rinse them off under clean running water before I do any "wiping" of them with a tissue or a cloth. I am very "conscious of the whole eyeglass issue... and try to make sure that I am not grinding excessive clay dust into the lens. In fact I typically cannot "see" any obvious dust sitting on the lenses when I clean them about 95% of the time. But still it keeps happening.

 

Is this just a "cost of doing business" and others are experienceing this same problem also. Or is it a Pearle Vision lens quality issue...and I should shift to another company's product? (My optometerist is located next door to Pearle Vision....conveninet.)

 

I REALLY do not want to have to go back to the heavier "glass" lenses (they did not exhibit this issue). But these glasses are expensive to keep replacing!!!!!

 

So I am very curious if it is just me or if other eyeglass wearers are finding the same kind of thing. Thanks.

 

 

best,

 

.........................john

 

PS: Shifting to contacts is not an option...... perscription issues as well as highly sensitive eyes.

 

 

 

Have you tried these things:

 

1) Don't clean them in the studio. Everything, regardless of how tidy you keep it, is covered with dust. Even your eyeballs! You can certainly rinse them in the studio, but your cleaning cloth is dusty even if you can't see it. Leave the studio for a dust free area, then clean them and shake off as much water as possible before drying with an absolutely dust free cloth.

2) Wear a set of "coveralls" over your prescription eyewear. This will keep the grittier stuff from pinging off of your lenses. The microscopic particles are wearing away at your lenses every time you are trimming dry clay etc. I have had lazik done on my eyes, and still wear protective glasses over my eyes to prevent splashing and excess dust from getting in my eyes. The ones I use are for people who do target practice with guns. They would easily fit over prescription lenses.

3) There is a silicone cleaner that helps hide the scratches so they last longer.

4) Keep an almost hopeless pair for studio use only.

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jlm205    0

John

 

-----hi impact polycarbonate lenses are your problem. even with scratch resistant coating they are super soft! switch to a hi-index lens material w/ scratch resistant coating for reduced weight. they'll do fine as safety lenses.

OR--- stay w/ cr-39 "factory coated" scratch resistant lenses and just go with a super small round frame that puts your eyeball into almost exact center of it on each eye (reduces edge thickness) and have lenses "surfaced" to minimum center thickness--again to reduce edge thickness/weight. ---------**find a good optician who knows how to at least order this from lab!

2 other suggestions:

1.-- NO anti-reflective coating!! hard as hell to clean.

2.---large diameter ultra thin "disposable" contact lenses. you'll be surprised how comfortable! i had sheet rock finishers, painters,etc wearing them.

hope you find relief!

john mckee--retired optometrist.

**i owned my own in-house surfacing lab too, in addition to prescribing rx's.

 

 

 

 

 

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JBaymore    1,432

Have you tried these things:

 

1) Don't clean them in the studio. Everything, regardless of how tidy you keep it, is covered with dust. Even your eyeballs! You can certainly rinse them in the studio, but your cleaning cloth is dusty even if you can't see it. Leave the studio for a dust free area, then clean them and shake off as much water as possible before drying with an absolutely dust free cloth.

2) Wear a set of "coveralls" over your prescription eyewear. This will keep the grittier stuff from pinging off of your lenses. The microscopic particles are wearing away at your lenses every time you are trimming dry clay etc. I have had lazik done on my eyes, and still wear protective glasses over my eyes to prevent splashing and excess dust from getting in my eyes. The ones I use are for people who do target practice with guns. They would easily fit over prescription lenses.

3) There is a silicone cleaner that helps hide the scratches so they last longer.

4) Keep an almost hopeless pair for studio use only.

 

 

I don't clean them in the studio. And the microfiber cleaning cloth is not in the studio either. And I replace it periodically. I would NEVER trim dry clay... and the studio environment is pretty darn clean as mentioned above (I teach ceramic toxicology). My current ones are "almost hopeless" wink.gif .

 

best,

 

................john

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JBaymore    1,432

John

 

-----hi impact polycarbonate lenses are your problem. even with scratch resistant coating they are super soft! switch to a hi-index lens material w/ scratch resistant coating for reduced weight. they'll do fine as safety lenses.

OR--- stay w/ cr-39 "factory coated" scratch resistant lenses and just go with a super small round frame that puts your eyeball into almost exact center of it on each eye (reduces edge thickness) and have lenses "surfaced" to minimum center thickness--again to reduce edge thickness/weight. ---------**find a good optician who knows how to at least order this from lab!

2 other suggestions:

1.-- NO anti-reflective coating!! hard as hell to clean.

2.---large diameter ultra thin "disposable" contact lenses. you'll be surprised how comfortable! i had sheet rock finishers, painters,etc wearing them.

hope you find relief!

john mckee--retired optometrist.

**i owned my own in-house surfacing lab too, in addition to prescribing rx's.

 

John,

 

THANK YOU. Great and clearly professionaly informed suggestions. I'll check into those thoughts.

 

best,

 

....................john

 

 

 

 

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LilyT    1

Hi all. Not sure if this is exactly the correct place for this.

 

I have been having a little problem for a number of years and I am wondering if this issue affects others also.... and how they have (or have not) solved it.

 

I am basically blind as a bat... and have worn glasses since I was a really young child. As I have ...... ahem.... "matured" wink.gif I not only cannot see at a distance but also now can't see close up. So I am always wearing one or another pair of glasses in the studio. For many years I have used the ultra-thin high impact poly-carbonate plastic lenses due to the thickness of my typical prescription and also since they are effectively "safety glasses" also.

 

I have a nice set of bi-focal "reading" glasses that I have had made up that I now use in the studio a lot of the time. I had the optometrist set the focal distance for the upper part for the distance to my wheelhead and the lower part for a closer in distance that fits my handbuilding and decorating needs. This works really great for me.

 

The problem here is that I find that both the distance and the "reading" glasses consistently get scratched all to heck in only about a year's time. I have tried every "scratch resistant coating" that Pearle Vision has available ....to no avail. In fact, the difference between a lens with scratch coating and one without does not seem to make a difference to this.

 

I am ASSUMING here that the issue is realted to the abrasive qualities of ceramic dusts I am exposed to.... but it is also possible that is NOT the genesis of this issue. But I THINK it must be.

 

I'm not exactly "Pigpen" in the studio... as my college students can attest.... being the "health and safety" nut on campus (many years as the chair of the college Health and Safety Committee). My home studio is kept pretty darn clean compared to all too many I have seen. I have local pickup ventilation for the major dust making operations, general duilution ventilation, and a ceiling mounted HEPA filter unit (for only when I think it might really be needed). I am constantly conscious of dust making activities...and try to minimize them.

 

When I clean my glasses, I typically rinse them off under clean running water before I do any "wiping" of them with a tissue or a cloth. I am very "conscious of the whole eyeglass issue... and try to make sure that I am not grinding excessive clay dust into the lens. In fact I typically cannot "see" any obvious dust sitting on the lenses when I clean them about 95% of the time. But still it keeps happening.

 

Is this just a "cost of doing business" and others are experienceing this same problem also. Or is it a Pearle Vision lens quality issue...and I should shift to another company's product? (My optometerist is located next door to Pearle Vision....conveninet.)

 

I REALLY do not want to have to go back to the heavier "glass" lenses (they did not exhibit this issue). But these glasses are expensive to keep replacing!!!!!

 

So I am very curious if it is just me or if other eyeglass wearers are finding the same kind of thing. Thanks.

 

 

best,

 

.........................john

 

PS: Shifting to contacts is not an option...... perscription issues as well as highly sensitive eyes.

 

 

 

Have you tried these things:

 

1) Don't clean them in the studio. Everything, regardless of how tidy you keep it, is covered with dust. Even your eyeballs! You can certainly rinse them in the studio, but your cleaning cloth is dusty even if you can't see it. Leave the studio for a dust free area, then clean them and shake off as much water as possible before drying with an absolutely dust free cloth.

2) Wear a set of "coveralls" over your prescription eyewear. This will keep the grittier stuff from pinging off of your lenses. The microscopic particles are wearing away at your lenses every time you are trimming dry clay etc. I have had lazik done on my eyes, and still wear protective glasses over my eyes to prevent splashing and excess dust from getting in my eyes. The ones I use are for people who do target practice with guns. They would easily fit over prescription lenses.

3) There is a silicone cleaner that helps hide the scratches so they last longer.

4) Keep an almost hopeless pair for studio use only.

 

 

hi, Terri,

 

Do you have a name of the silicone cleanser? I have problems with scratches

all the time, too. In addition, the very expensive coatings on my very expensive

prescription lenses (terrible vision) have for a decade now frequently gone bad early -

flaking off, getting a 'fracture' pattern in the center, etc, in addition to many small

scratches despite careful cleaning only after running water. I'm too embarrassed

to keep going back to my optometrist (tried a couple of excellent local

places) for replacement! I'd live with it if something could make it less

noticeable.

 

Thanks,

Lily

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Thanks from me too for all these suggestions. just got a new pair of scratch resistant glasses and will try to keep them safe from the scratches with all your suggestions.

marcia

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DAY    8

Thanks from me too for all these suggestions. just got a new pair of scratch resistant glasses and will try to keep them safe from the scratches with all your suggestions.

marcia

 

 

I have been buying Rx eyeware on line for several tears now.

http://www.eyebuydirect.com/eyeglasses-price-6.95,49.95.html?sort=default

At $6.95, you can treat them almost like 'disposble' contact lenses.

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Denice    243

Have you considered the Lazik surgery? We had a friend that did it because he was having to get new glasses every six months, like you he was blind as a bat. After the surgery he still had to wear glassed but they were a light correction and he could get any lens he wanted. He was so pleased he had his son's eyes corrected and he no longer had to wear glasses. He said it was cheaper to pay for the surgery in the long run than all of the glasses he had to buy. Denice

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Idaho Potter    62

I, too, have worn glasses since I was 13. I needed them before (couldn't see separate leaves on a tree!), but back then if you couldn't read the blackboard they just moved you to the front row.

 

I wear line bi-focals with anti-reflective coating. Regardless of what Jim205 says, if glare bothers you, it's a necessity. I get mine from Dr. Barnes Eyemart Express, which was also supplying the eyeglass cleaner for me. I'd take my little bottle back in and get it refilled until one of the clerks said just put two drops of Joy in a half cup of water and you're good to go. I thought anti-reflective coating needed special cleaner (a lot of the kits specifically say NOT FOR ANTI-REFLECTIVE COATINGS), and that's true, but a mild mix of water and Joy seems to do the job well.

 

When you're working in the studio and the glasses are slipping down your nose, it seems easier to just reach a hand up and push them back. Don't. Take time to rinse your hands and resettle your glasses by handling the frames. Definitely don't clean your glasses while in the studio. Running water, a little bit of dishwashing liquid and a clean dry cloth will get you set for the next round of fun. My glasses last anywhere from one to two years (when I have to change the prescription anyway). I have prrescription sunglasses and another clear pair (distance correction only) that I use for driving.

 

I don't know if there's an easy answer for any of us, but it's nice that none of us are alone and that maybe we'll find the solution.

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Darcy Kane    28

My lenses must be glass because I don't take very good care of them, and they are in great shape. What I did want to mention is, don't overlook progressive lenses. I love mine. It gives me perfect clarity from book reading distance, computer screen use, grocery store shelf distance, and road signs before I am right on top of them. I also wear mono vision contacts during the school year and they work super now that I have found the lens cleaner that uses hydrogen peroxide.

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AndyL    23

Until you find a better anti scratch coating you can put on use protective googles that your glasses can go under. I don't really have a problem with dust scratching my lenses. I rinse off any dust or silt under a running tap. but I don't rub the lenses while I do that. It's the rubbing that grinds the grit into the lens.

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Peter    0

Hi John,

 

I too have been plagued with scratches appearing on expensive glasses. I've never been able to adjust to bifocals so I've got 4 pairs for various distances along with sunglasses and motorcycle goggles.

A number of years ago I asked an optometrist friend of mine why, even with prescribed care, fine scratches appear and he told me to never, ever bring any cloth in contact with the glass. His advice was to

rinse the glasses then wash them with "Zest" hand soap. It rinses off completely and with a shake, the minute droplets left dry clear.

I have never had to replace glasses since unless I was careless and dropped them.

Now I replace glasses only because of prescription changes and then I just get new lenses installed..

 

Hope this helps a bit,

Peter

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JBaymore    1,432

A number of years ago I asked an optometrist friend of mine why, even with prescribed care, fine scratches appear and he told me to never, ever bring any cloth in contact with the glass. His advice was to

rinse the glasses then wash them with "Zest" hand soap. It rinses off completely and with a shake, the minute droplets left dry clear.

I have never had to replace glasses since unless I was careless and dropped them.

 

Peter,

 

VERY interesting. Thanks. What that says is that there is NO solution to the issue except what was mentioned. I've switched from microfiber cleaning cloths after rinsing them under water to the pre-packaged wet cleaner lens ttissue... ane that seems to help betterh than the microfiber. But it still is a 1 year lens before the scratching is totally objectionable.

 

Thanks.

 

best,

 

.....................john

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Bobg    4

I have to replace my glasses every year due to scratches. I work outside in the dust and dirt and don't clean them during the day, just run water on them at home and clean with a dry towel. They always scratch and I think most of mine are from blowing dirts and dust. To me it just the price of wearing glasses.

 

Bob

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