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Does A Classy Wheel Make Better Pots?is It Time For An Upgrade?

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I've been throwing for 5 years, some at a tec school and mostly at home on an old home built wheel I bought 2nd hand. It is made of factory components and is 1 hp, I think. I have paid my studio bills and now find myself longing for a new snazzy wheel. The wheel I have has a little bit of a wobble in the head, the pedal isn't very delicate , sort of go , slow or stop. It is NOISY, and I am beginning to wonder about the motor, because I can hear the pitch of the whine drop when I put pressure on it, centering even a small 3lb ball of clay. I does not have a reverse, something I wish for when doing certain things.

 

I know what I am wishing for and it is EXPENSIVE.

 

So, will a different wheel , steady quiet, responsive peddle, adjustable height, silent, easy to clean, have any effect on the finished product, or is it just cosmetic and for my pleasure?

 

Having trouble justifying this purchase, even tho I have paid for an entire studio, building and all equipment so far with sales and am even right now.

 

Without it, I will begin to make a profit now, with it, it will take 6 months longer to get to that point.

 

Wat chall think?

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You are talking to a forum full of pottery enablers !!

 

 

biggrin.gifbiggrin.gifbiggrin.gif

 

Nice one!

 

 

Good tools frequently increase productivity and the quality of the work. But plenty of great pieces have been made over the millennia with less than optimal tools. If you are "fighting the tool"... if there are features you need to get your ideas into concrete form...... then likely a better one will help.

 

No easy pat answers to this one.

 

best,

 

...................john

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Generally speaking, I don't think expensive tools result in better pots. However in your case, a wobbly wheelhead and indelicate pedal are probably consuming a lot of your energy. Plus I'm really impressed with your habit of paying off your studio equipment with pottery sales, rather than losing track of your debt, and in my book you have earned a new wheel.

 

Mea

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Guest Herb Norris

Yeah, buy a new wheel, you'll feel better and make much better work.

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Funny, my friend and I bought a second wheel for our little studio. A very nice Lockerbie electric/kick combo. I like our first kit made kick wheel better. I still haven't gotten the hang of throwing on the new one.

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Funny, my friend and I bought a second wheel for our little studio. A very nice Lockerbie electric/kick combo. I like our first kit made kick wheel better. I still haven't gotten the hang of throwing on the new one.

 

 

 

Thanks for all the 'enabling! The wheel I have has made me alot of nice pots, but I feel I working for them more than I might. Went and tried the one I am lusting after, a Thomas Stuart 1/2 hp Revolution. SMOOOOOTH compared to where I am.

Very nice foot pedal response. There is an upgrade for a pedal accessory, the SSX. Anyone using this?

 

I have been thinking about a 2nd wheel for a while, some of my handbuilding students want to give it a whirl and studio wheel time for them could pay for much of the cost. I would keep the current wheel for them .

 

Mea, thanks for the support, I need to pay my bills as I go. Over the 5 years I have paid for my tec school classes, and the cost of everything (except clay), equipment, studio , electrics, building costs, one pot at a time. Doing 2-3 week workshops for beginners has really helped with this.

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I love my Shimpo VL-Whisper. It's extremely quiet. If you're buying new, check the prices around the internet and call your local supplier. If you find a good deal online, chances are that supplier will match it.

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I'm in the market for a wheel, too... has anybody used Creative Industries wheels? I love the Brent machines at the studio where I'm a member, but the ads Iv'e seen for the "Big Boss" wheel look enticing. The reviews I've found seem mixed and not always up to date -- the latest here being from last year. Or would that age even matter? I mean, how often do pottery wheels change, certainly not like buying a used car?

 

Thank you.

Edited by Ghilayne

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I'm in the market for a wheel, too... has anybody used Creative Industries wheels? I love the Brent machines at the studio where I'm a member, but the ads Iv'e seen for the "Big Boss" wheel look enticing. The reviews I've found seem mixed and not always up to date -- the latest here being from last year. Or would that age even matter? I mean, how often do pottery wheels change, certainly not like buying a used car?

 

Thank you.

 

 

Hi Ghilayne,

Fair warning - this post is coming from a newbie. I've only been working with clay once a week for about 7 months. However, I am already completely addicted and know that a wheel is somewhere in my future. Lately I've been doing some "window shopping" on the Internet just to get an idea of prices and what is out there. (I can't afford / justify the purchase yet, but one day.....and I want to be prepared when "one day" comes.) I've seen the Big Boss ads too and at first was intrigued as well. I'd suggest trying to find someone that will let you try one out before you make a decision. Especially if you already have experience on another wheel that you love. Maybe my lack of experience was the problem, but I wasn't impressed when I tried the new Big Boss that we just got at the studio where I take classes. On the other hand, I LOVE the Brents we have.

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Guest Michael Kline

Have you thought about a used wheel? I bought a 20 year old shimpo in 1990 and am still using it. I've made a lot of pots on this wheel. I paid $300 then. It might pay to shop around. In the same breath , I'll say that I'm looking to buy a whisper whenever I get ahead! ;-)

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Yes, Michael, I'm using a well used one now, and have made a lot of pots on it.

 

I have wanted a 2nd wheel for some time, because my handbuiling class peeps want to try wheel, and the one I have only goes my way, which is for 'lefties' like me. No reverse switch.

 

Soooooooo,

 

I ORDERED THE THOMAS STUART AND IT'S COMING TOMORROW!!!biggrin.gifbiggrin.gifbiggrin.gif Thanks for all the 'enabling".

 

I already have 3 women signed up for wheel lessons, so I'm already paying for it.wink.gif I've been in my studio all day rearranging a place for it.smile.gif

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Guest Michael Kline

yes a second wheel is what I need, One for stoneware, one for porcelain. one can never really have too many wheels, especially if you can teach lessons!

 

I also have a treadle wheel that I love to use to trim.

:)

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