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Lifting The Veil Of Naiveté


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#1 Pres

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Posted 29 March 2015 - 04:32 PM

As mentioned before, I have never been good with names. I have seen a ton of pots over the years, some I liked, some I thought clunky, some I thought were chasing avante garde to be the next big thing, some I thought they were using the limits of technique for an excuse for poor design or craftsmanship. This is  part of my naivete and the lack of depth in my understanding of many aspects of ceramics. That said, this last NCECA was quite an eye opener in many ways. Going around with Tom, looking at and handling a number of pots clarified, and reinforced many of my own beliefs I had about ceramics that I had assumed were prejudices on my own part.

 

At the same time, I attended some sessions that exposed me to some different ideas, and artists. I also heard some say they never went to demonstrations because they knew most of what people were doing. Maybe I being a teacher, and having a pretty well rounded background in making would not get anything new out of them. However, I usually approach a demo in a different way. I may know the pots, but not the person. I go to a demo to relate to the person, to understand as best I can what influences them, and to see how they approach the work. Often I am quite surprised, and sometimes quite disappointed. At this NCECA I was blown away to discover a name I had never seen before, look at work that was completely new and fresh to me and to watch an individual that worked tirelessly demonstrating, answering questions and taking part in discussion with careful honest opinions. However, in retrospect he mouthed very little, but his work spoke volumes. I had never heard of Gustovo Perez before the conference, my bad. However, if you have never heard of him, or seen his work, please google him. In my humble opinion, he is akin to a Picasso of ceramics.

 

So have you gone to an event, and seen something or someone that you have never heard of or seen before that raised your "veil of naivete"?

 

Best,

Pres


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#2 rakukuku

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Posted 29 March 2015 - 07:01 PM

Someone recently loaned me a Mexican Arts magazine that featured Gustavo Perez.  Spectacular work. Sure would have loved to meet him.    Lucky you. 



#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 29 March 2015 - 07:54 PM

I thought he spoke very thoughtfully and his working of clay was mesmerizing. I enjoyed his discussion very much also.
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#4 Pres

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Posted 29 March 2015 - 10:04 PM

I spoke to him briefly telling him how much I enjoyed his work and his presentation. It seemed to give him joy also. Really liked listening to him and watching his efficient way of working, and the way he stated that this(demo) was not really working, just showing what he did.


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#5 Stephen

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 10:29 AM

Thanks! I am going to check him out now.

 

who's Tom?



#6 Pres

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 11:05 AM

Tom is TJR, from Winnipeg, Tom Roberts. We have been aware of each other in the forum, sent personal messages, and decided to meet at NCECA, first one for him in 17 yrs. His last was at Vegas! Great story there, but best left to his telling.

 

Great guy!


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#7 PSC

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 12:15 PM

I just love watching others create. It doesn't matter what they are making, i love watching the process. I loved in college propping myself up an unused kickwheel and watching the other students throw. I learned so much about what not to do and new ways of holding my hands to acheive things i wanted to do. I loved rambling down to the painting studio at 2 am after my hands were too tired to throw more and chatting up the painters and watching them put paint to canvas. I think that is what i miss the most being a lone potter...the watching...yes i know there is youtube but that is more about them showing me how they make not casual watching that i learn how they create, creating is more than the movement, it is descision making and the quiet passion that canned video can not convey.

#8 Chris Campbell

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 04:29 PM

I agree PSC .. That is also a great part of the workshop experience ... Wandering around other studios to see what the other night owls are up to.
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#9 Benzine

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 05:30 PM

Tom is TJR, from Winnipeg, Tom Roberts. We have been aware of each other in the forum, sent personal messages, and decided to meet at NCECA, first one for him in 17 yrs. His last was at Vegas! Great story there, but best left to his telling.

 

Great guy!

 

 

Is he as Canadian in person, as he seems online?.....

 

I looked up Gustavo Perez.  The first thing that comes up, is a Youtube video of him making various forms, very interesting.  I like his approach.  You mention that you used to think, that some hide their lack of skill, by doing something "different".  I do think this can be the case, in any medium.  I had a classmate in college, who liked to work abstract, and use strange materials.  Many of the instructors love his work.  But one time, we had to do a project focusing on value/ blending.  He couldn't do it well, and heavily outlined many of the objects.  The instructor inquired why, and he went into a spiel about "Well I did this, to emphasize this, blah, blah, blah".  The instructor then said, "But that wasn't the assignment".  We were all shocked, as usually they ate up his work and explanations of it.  

Annnnyway, with Gustavo's work, none of that seems to be the case.  He takes a well thrown vessel and alters it.  My Dad had a college instructor, who was apparently a student of Shoji Hamada.  The guy would also throw a vessel, and then alter it, sometimes by punching it.

 

I've tried some altering, post throwing.  Usually not that aggressive.  For me, it's more of just a hard press thumb to create a groove, or something of the like.


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#10 Pres

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 09:24 PM

Ben,

TJR is as Canadian as one could possibly be. Where's the beer! At the same time, the guy has a heart as big as the Canadian Rockies!

 

No one could ever make the statement I made about Gustovo Perez. I will elaborate more on my feeling about that statement as I figure out how to state what may only be my own prejudice, lack of understanding or naivete.

 

best

Pres


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . . http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

#11 Chantay

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 10:24 PM

"The Veil of Naivete"

I feel this happen often. I believe it is because I am still a beginning potter, only 3 1/2 years under the wheel. I also work mostly in isolation. When I do take a workshop or class I have many aha moments as I see and learn how others do things. I am so envious of those with opportunities to learn from others. Just being able to watch someone else work can be enlightening.
- chantay

#12 Nancy S.

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Posted 20 December 2015 - 08:35 AM

Being self-taught, I always used to think that the "pro" potters didn't make mistakes or have certain problems. Watching a live demo made me understand that they DO, but online videos and such just don't show them. I'm not such a screwup after all! :-)

#13 TJR

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Posted 20 December 2015 - 09:44 AM

Thanks! I am going to check him out now.

 

who's Tom?

I am. Tom Roberts aka TJR .I hung out with Pres quite a bit at NCECA. We were both very impressed with Gustavo Perez.

TJR.



#14 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 20 December 2015 - 03:01 PM

his work is spectacular.  What a lesson.  Maybe you don't attend a demonstration to learn technique, but maybe for inspiration.  Its important not to get stuck in a funk of making the same stuff year upon year. 


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#15 terrim8

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Posted 05 March 2016 - 09:53 PM

I googled him & you are correct! That work is pretty impressive. I like the use of black glaze to define the strong shapes.  But I generally just like the strong shapes  melded with beautiful geometric style. It's like a Frank Gehry building! 






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