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I'll Never Be A Real Potter.


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#41 Diesel Clay

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Posted 28 March 2015 - 12:57 AM

I just hope that those of us who are not "REAL" potters, are also NOT "VIRTUAL" potters!  I'm not a gambler, but I bet there is a game for virtual potters somewhere in the web galaxy !
 
On the other hand..... virtual pottery would be clean, neat, tidy, not dusty, wouldn't make my hands itch, swallow cash, ....... or be as much FUN!

 
Totally an App for that :D https://itunes.apple...d380090605?mt=8


I have this app!!
Mildly entertaining, but not as good as the real thing.

#42 Chilly

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Posted 28 March 2015 - 03:58 AM

Perhaps that's how they'll run the Britain's best potter show? 


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#43 JBaymore

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Posted 29 March 2015 - 10:32 PM

Everyone knows that Real Potters fire to cone 16 with wood over a minimum of 10 days!

 

best,

 

.................john  ;)


John Baymore
Adjunct Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

Former Guest Professor, Wuxi Institute of Arts and Science, Yixing, China

Former President and Past President; Potters Council
 

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#44 Denice

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 09:27 AM

Great topic I also remember the days when you had to fire C10 reduction to be a real potter.  Low fire terracotta was for little old ladies and C6 electric was crazy.   Denice



#45 JBaymore

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 09:38 AM

My "pet peeve" topic lately is when people say to me (or in workshops or classes) " I only fire with an electric kiln."  That word 'ONLY' has such negative implications.  Like they are admitting they are a second class citizen or something.  Arrrgggghhhhhhhh.  Drives me crazy. 

 

Raku kilns do stuff.

 

Gas kilns do stuff.

 

Wood kilns do stuff.

 

Electric kilns do stuff.

 

Just make sure the stuff they do is GOOD stuff!

 

best,

 

..........................john


John Baymore
Adjunct Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

Former Guest Professor, Wuxi Institute of Arts and Science, Yixing, China

Former President and Past President; Potters Council
 

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

http://www.nhia.edu/...ty/john-baymore


#46 Chris Campbell

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 10:13 AM

I think the firing elitism is less now ... Ron and John blew the lid off when they wrote their book on Mastering Cone 6 glazes ... Thank you both!
I heard a couple years ago that there was a book in process (not by Ron/john) on using commercial glazes but have not seen it yet. It would be great if their use could be legitimized for the non production potter. ( I say that since they are usually too costly if you are going through tons of clay. ) So many potters apologize for using these glazes ... a product that works perfectly for their purposes, engineered by folks who know what they are doing.
I think there is still a bit of ... Eh, Whatever you want to call it ... Around what you make.
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#47 entasis

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 12:48 AM

None of the master potters during the Sung Dynasty studied chemistry from a textbook.



#48 PRankin

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 09:30 AM

I have found this sense of elitism in other aspects of my professional and recreational life. It is related to this discussion. In rollerblading, I'm a certified instructor and skate with a few different clubs. There is an elitism regarding the brand of skates and especially the size of wheels. The largest being the most elitist and the smallest are only for beginners or recreational skaters. You can really sense it when someone builds their own skates with custom boots, frames and wheels, and they flaunt the attitude that they are real skaters and my store bought skates are inferior and I'm not a real skater. In tennis, it's similar regarding the brand of racket and whether you have your own stringing machine or not. None of these situations even consider the person's skills.

Paul

#49 TJR

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 10:50 AM

 

I guess some artists are not real painters either because they don't make their own paints?

 

 

Dang right they aren't!  They are also not real painters, if they don't weave their own linen for canvases, hunt down animals, to shave for brush bristles and chop down their own trees to make canvas stretches and brush handles.

 

And don't get me started on so called "Potters", who don't mine their own clay and glaze materials...

 

Didn't we have a post about this already? I mentioned my water wheel for crushing/grinding materials?

T.



#50 TJR

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 10:52 AM

Great topic I also remember the days when you had to fire C10 reduction to be a real potter.  Low fire terracotta was for little old ladies and C6 electric was crazy.   Denice

Still like that,he said rubbing his beard as he mixed up a cone 10 glaze from raw materials mined and crushed on his own property.

T.



#51 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 10:53 AM

My wheel says it's a professional so I let it do all the hard work  ;)


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#52 Chilly

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Posted 05 April 2015 - 03:26 AM

I've had kids come to cycle lessons on "professional" bikes.  The kids can't ride them very well as they are so heavy and have cheap bearings that don't roll well.  So much for being a pro.  I thought I was being insulted the other day when someone said I was a Professional cyclist.  I thought they meant I was a road cyclist who got paid.  I 'spose I am a pro cyclist as I get paid for riding my bike, but in a different way to the accepted term.  

 

I'm happy being an amateur potter.


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#53 Rae Reich

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 06:41 PM

I have only shaved twice in my whole life and do have a short beard.I never thought it as a prerequisite to potting-I was called an animal today if that counts.
Mark

Mark;
What were those two times when you shaved your beard? Probably something serious,like a girlfriend.
TJR.
First time was when I turned 30 to see what I looked like.
Second time was after being married 10 years to surprise my wife who had never seen my face.
Both times where BAD ideas.I'm done with the thought of it again
Mark
I can relate to your wife. In the second grade we drew family portraits to be displayed on Parent's Night. I was proud of the carefully drawn "Clark Gable" mustache that signified Daddy to me. On the night, in front of the drawing, I looked up to confirm my verisimilitude only to discover that Daddy had inexplicably shaved it off! And I hadn't noticed from my 3' perspective. I was devastated, as though my abilities had been called into question before the world! As far as I can remember, he never shaved it off again for the rest of his life.
Rae

#54 TJR

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 07:15 AM

I have only shaved twice in my whole life and do have a short beard.I never thought it as a prerequisite to potting-I was called an animal today if that counts.

Mark

Mark, you animal, you. Hate to break it to you, but not all animals have beards. What about lizards?

TJR.



#55 Pres

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 08:37 AM

So, I worked as a teacher for many years, and thought of myself as a professional, in my manner, the respect I gave others, the time I put into preparation, planning and presenting lessons, my writing skills in creating documents for curriculum and state approvals, and the way I dressed and carried myself. I never considered myself a professional artist, potter, sculptor, printmaker, jeweler, or weaver, or even animator, as those things were what I taught. I knew back then that I was able to use the tools, design and execute an object, but only because I was teaching these things. Now I wonder, where did the change come in, where I was no longer doing as taught to teach others, but where now I explored different paths and avenues to raise the bar for my students and myself. Now that I am retired, and spending much more time analyzing what I do, how I do it, and especially why I do it a certain way, I realize how much there is yet to learn, and how little time to do it. When can anyone become a professional where they know exactly what they are doing. I think to some of the artists out there that found a niche, and stayed with it for years. Are they professional because they stay where they were 10 or 20 years ago? Is the constant search for style as illusive for others, as it is to me? I can't consider myself a professional potter, when I have so many questions!

 

best,

Pres 


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . . http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

#56 JBaymore

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 11:13 AM

Is the constant search for style as illusive for others, as it is to me? I can't consider myself a professional potter, when I have so many questions!

 

I think "style" finds you, you don't "find" it.  And yes it is illusive.  It is the answers to all those questions.  And it evolves as long as you keep asking those questions.

 

best,

 

.......................john


John Baymore
Adjunct Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

Former Guest Professor, Wuxi Institute of Arts and Science, Yixing, China

Former President and Past President; Potters Council
 

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

http://www.nhia.edu/...ty/john-baymore


#57 Cavy Fire Studios

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 12:30 PM

I have only shaved twice in my whole life and do have a short beard.I never thought it as a prerequisite to potting-I was called an animal today if that counts.
Mark

Mark, you animal, you. Hate to break it to you, but not all animals have beards. What about lizards?
TJR.

Clearly you have never heard of the totally adorable bearded dragon! ^_^

And dangit! Terracotta ain't just for old ladies--I just like bright underglazes, heehee. And come on. Ya'll gotta be nuts to not love the rich red of micaceous redart... mmmm... SO YUMMY. ♥ I like ^10 reduction pottery, but it is waaaay not what I need. I really miss ^6 sometimes, but then I get to thinking that honestly? My kind is a rarity. It took me years to accept that lowfire is the right place for me, just because most of what I see is mid/high fire and I felt left out. I got really depressed, like IN TEARS depressed, because I sometimes thought my work was "less worthy" than all those creamy porcelains or chunky woodfired pieces. It really boils down to personal insecurity, I think. As artists, that little bugger whispering in our ears is difficult to get rid of, lol...

But, I love my red clay. It does things with the glazes I found that are gorgeous, and since I fire a bit higher than the glaze is rated for, my work is safe for regular use (and I glaze the bottom). I'm a happy guinea about my work. ♥ I just wish my stupid hands worked better, grrr...
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#58 flowerdry

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 07:18 PM

 I can't consider myself a professional potter, when I have so many questions!"

 

Pres, I think your ponderings are worthy of a whole other topic.  What does it mean to be a professional potter.  For me, being a professional didn't meant I had no more questions.  In fact, it might have been the reverse.  It meant I had the training, background and experience to know which questions to ask..  Not pottery, by the way, because professional I am definately not.


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#59 PRankin

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 08:12 PM

But, I love my red clay. It does things with the glazes I found that are gorgeous, and since I fire a bit higher than the glaze is rated for, my work is safe for regular use (and I glaze the bottom). I'm a happy guinea about my work. ♥ I just wish my stupid hands worked better, grrr...


Guinea, what cone do you fire at?

Paul

#60 Cavy Fire Studios

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Posted 12 October 2015 - 11:59 AM

I fire my stuff at ^03. :) Maybe I just have some seriously good quality terracotta, but I have never had a problem with dishwasher/microwave/counter peeing with my pieces when they were fired at that temp. I also make sure to leave room for a deeper foot so I can put glaze inside there. That adds further protection against leakage, and it looks pretty! ^_^
"I wheek; therefore, I am."
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