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Who Of You Is Making Funeral Urns?

urn; funeral article magazine; throwing; handbuilding; philosophy;

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#41 ChenowethArts

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Posted 25 March 2015 - 06:42 AM

I was doing some re-reading of the October 2013 Ceramics Monthly this morning and stumbled on a full page ad for the  Art Honors Life Gallery at Funeria (funeria.com).  The artists featured in the ad do what I would consider noteworthy  "personal memorial art":

The Funeria site also includes a lengthy list of artists..pretty sure that most of them make some sort of urns, memorial art, etc.  I have not clicked through on all of the available artist's links, but what I found is worth a second look.

 

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#42 janiebgood

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Posted 26 March 2015 - 06:49 PM

Making an urn for the cremains of a loved one is an honor for me to do.  If my small talent can offer comfort to someone, it seems like the least I can do.  



#43 Rae Reich

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 07:28 PM

BUT this idea I think is way cool! http://www.luciapott...degradable.php¬†

That link didn't work for me, but this one does:  http://www.luciapott...odegradable.php
 
There was a space at the end.........
I am going for permanence, not biodegradable. I would not want to drop one of those green urns full of ashes. The ashes are quite heavy. What if someone knocks Dad off the mantel?
TJR.
I made an unfired urn for a surfer friend, to ride out to sea on an old board . . .

#44 Mark C.

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Posted 17 June 2015 - 02:56 PM

Two cat urns in cooling glaze fire now. I'll be creamating two cats next week in small gas kiln.
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#45 hershey8

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Posted 12 October 2015 - 09:07 PM

I intend to make some urns to sell some day, just so I can say, " I make money the old fashioned way; I urn it."      ba dump, bump.....thud.



#46 Mark C.

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Posted 18 October 2015 - 05:20 PM

I used to make urns but it made me dead tired.

Mark


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#47 Chilly

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 12:25 PM

I used to make urns but it made me dead tired.

Mark

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#48 Pres

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 11:38 AM

I have been asked to do an urn by my father for a man he was a guardian for for the last 40 years. The urn has to be able to fit into a burial vault. So I am waiting to hear the size of the vault.

 

best,

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#49 Chris Campbell

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 12:53 PM

More money in pet urns than people urns! .... In case you were wondering.
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#50 Joseph F

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 01:54 PM

So true Chris. I have been thinking about that business for a long time. Probably will get into it in 2017-18 if mugs alone doesn't pay enough.

Pres let us know how it goes? Can we expect blog post about it?

#51 Pres

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 06:19 PM

Yeah, I will post over this as it goes.

 

best,

Pres


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#52 Mark C.

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 12:15 AM

I have an urn that I made for my last cat which I need to cremate when its raining in my small gas kiln.

There is a large market for pets urns so consider that.

I have considered getting into that market as I wind down my Art show circuit  as I age.


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#53 MatthewV

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 02:03 AM

And pet cremations too. Less hassle, only the owners are grieving, and few legal restrictions about it too. Visiting all the vets is all the advertising you need to do. Yup, if I wanted to make money, I would get into pet cremations.


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#54 No Longer Member

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 11:00 PM

She's done maybe six. My cousin needed one for her grandmother (not mine) and was complaining about how "expensive" it was ($150 and she makes a LOT more than we do).

 

I told her,

 

"Well,.... I have an ol' mayonnaise jar here you can put granny in...." :rolleyes:

 

I know that sounds callous but I was really mad at her (cousin-and still am; I've never have liked her). She didn't even visit our grandmother when she was dying and here she is going on-and-on about some woman who didn't care for her anything close to what our grandmother did...and then she's gonna cry about money....and then something about doing a "water burial" for her.

 

Stupid me, I guess I should offered to flush her too.... :lol:


Fit'in to hang this shizzle up fo' good....


#55 terrim8

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Posted 19 October 2016 - 10:41 PM

One of the participants at the soda/salt workshop I just came back from made her own urn for this purpose.  I can't face that yet but I suppose its a practical thing to do.



#56 Mark C.

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 01:19 AM

I have made many an urn-for people and for animals.

I have always just given the folks whom I knew the urns. Never yet sold one.

Never made any for customers just friends and myself.


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#57 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 12:23 PM

Have made several for in-laws and a former student whose daughter committed suicide while in a youth care center.

Never could charge friends either.

Marcia


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#58 Mark C.

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 02:19 PM

My retired Veterinarian  friend always wanted me to make them for his clinic and I may some day put them in production as a wholesale item for vets around here-just have not needed to pursue another venture as I'm doing quite well with what I have going now.


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#59 Pres

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 08:14 AM

Here is one that I finished lately as had mentioned before. The glazed piece had to be out so quick, I did not get a pic of it. Oh well.

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#60 RonSa

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 07:37 AM

I've made a couple of urns from wood over the years, both turned on a lathe and rectangular wooden boxes.

 

In reading this thread I've noticed that it wasn't mention on how to size an urn.

 

You might read on the web that for each pound of weight you should have 1 cubic in volume, sadly this is incorrect. .

 

After speaking to a funeral director (a couple actually) I learned that it doesn't matter if the person weighs 175lb or 350lb, the cremains are about the same at 200 cubic inches and the standard size container measures 6"W X 4.25" d X 8"H (inside dimensions).

 

Its easy to layout a rectangular box for the correct size, but throwing or turning an urn on a potters wheel or a wood lathe is not as simple.

 

The way I check the volume is to measure out 14.5 cups of rice for an adult human, 3 cups of rice for a good size adult dog and less for a cat.

 

1 cup of rice is 14.43 cubic inches so 14.5 cups = 209 cubic inches. Sorry to be blunt, I feel its better to have a little extra space than to not have enough space.

 

I'm not experienced enough with clay to give information on how to account for how much clay shrinks during firing but this is indeed something that should be considered.

 

Hope this helps.


Ron






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