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Who Of You Is Making Funeral Urns?

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#21 TJR

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Posted 15 March 2015 - 10:55 AM

 

  BUT this idea I think is way cool! http://www.luciapott...degradable.php 

That link didn't work for me, but this one does:  http://www.luciapott...odegradable.php

 

There was a space at the end.........

 

I am going for permanence, not biodegradable. I would not want to drop one of those green urns full of ashes. The ashes are quite heavy. What if someone knocks Dad off the mantel?

TJR.



#22 Darcy Kane

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Posted 15 March 2015 - 02:10 PM

I have made several urns. I usually make two-one to be buried and one for the family.

I made two for my mom. she died in 2003. We buried one in her grave, and then have the other on a shelf.I like the idea of having somewhere concrete to visit, as in a grave sight.

The jars were 5 pounds of stoneware. I placed my mom in there myself. I then epoxied the lid on.. She should be good for about 2,ooo years.

TJR.

So you split her up into two "pieces?"



#23 Darcy Kane

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Posted 15 March 2015 - 02:12 PM

 

 

  BUT this idea I think is way cool! http://www.luciapott...degradable.php 

That link didn't work for me, but this one does:  http://www.luciapott...odegradable.php

 

There was a space at the end.........

 

I am going for permanence, not biodegradable. I would not want to drop one of those green urns full of ashes. The ashes are quite heavy. What if someone knocks Dad off the mantel?

TJR.

 

The whole idea of the biodegradable urn is that it does break down quickly in the ground.  Dust to dust, ashes to ashes and all that.  The goal isn't to entomb the ashes for time eternal but to return the body to the earth.  



#24 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 16 March 2015 - 06:23 AM

Thank you all so much in continuing to write stories about urns, death and all that's going with it...

 

I too are struggling with the Death thing, Darcy, but I like to tackle it by writing the article. And Alabama: I like the SHAKE part. I want to be together with my husband too in an urn, and the shaking is only a mixing the ashes a bit better... Awwwww, it's so strange to write about all that. I always have a feeling of starting to giggle uncontrollably, out of insecurity and nervousness....

 

I have huge problems too with the ash glazes! I couldn't do that. And also with dividing the ashes. I want to get into an urn whole, (no pun intended), I mean ALL of my ashes, not just a part.

 

Keep the infos and your notions about this topic coming please! Thank you and kudos to you all.

 

Evelyne


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#25 TJR

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Posted 16 March 2015 - 07:50 AM

 

 

 

  BUT this idea I think is way cool! http://www.luciapott...degradable.php 

That link didn't work for me, but this one does:  http://www.luciapott...odegradable.php

 

There was a space at the end.........

 

I am going for permanence, not biodegradable. I would not want to drop one of those green urns full of ashes. The ashes are quite heavy. What if someone knocks Dad off the mantel?

TJR.

 

The whole idea of the biodegradable urn is that it does break down quickly in the ground.  Dust to dust, ashes to ashes and all that.  The goal isn't to entomb the ashes for time eternal but to return the body to the earth.  

 

I know what the idea is.I know how long greenware lasts. I am going for eternity.

TJR.



#26 Pres

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Posted 16 March 2015 - 08:50 AM

This topic will help me a bit. My wife and I both want to be cremated. She wants me to make the urns. She really does not want anything permanent, just ashes in the Teton's. I have tried to get her to realize that somewhere should be a plaque or stone commemorating her presence here. Seems egotistical, but reality is when doing genealogy, many people refer to grave sites for reference of dates, family, spouses, children etc. I would like a plaque on my parents joint stone or a stone nearby. Just to make it easier for people to find me! :huh:


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#27 Darcy Kane

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Posted 16 March 2015 - 09:56 AM

This topic will help me a bit. My wife and I both want to be cremated. She wants me to make the urns. She really does not want anything permanent, just ashes in the Teton's. I have tried to get her to realize that somewhere should be a plaque or stone commemorating her presence here. Seems egotistical, but reality is when doing genealogy, many people refer to grave sites for reference of dates, family, spouses, children etc. I would like a plaque on my parents joint stone or a stone nearby. Just to make it easier for people to find me! :huh:

While we did toss everyone overboard in one manner or another (plane, boat) we left a plaque affixed to a boulder to commemorate our dad.  

 

Personally I'm leaning toward being tossed to the breezes.  I plan on coming back anyways as I am sure I still have some karma to work off, and I don't want to have my old ashes affixed to a broken piece of pottery or on a shelf in someone's storage unit who has no clue who I was.  Or worse, have strangers dump me out because they have no clue who I was and are tired of the responsibility of watching over me and keeping me dusted.



#28 PRankin

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Posted 16 March 2015 - 06:14 PM

A few ounces of me would like to go this way:

http://en.m.wikipedi...ki/Space_burial

Paul

#29 Diesel Clay

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Posted 16 March 2015 - 10:20 PM

We scatter ashes in our family, but it is a really good idea to have some sort of place to visit that isn't on, say, private land. My one set of grandparents was scattered on a beautiful site on an acreage my family no longer owns. I can't visit them, and this causes me grief.

#30 Chilly

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 10:47 PM

 

This topic will help me a bit. My wife and I both want to be cremated. She wants me to make the urns. She really does not want anything permanent, just ashes in the Teton's. I have tried to get her to realize that somewhere should be a plaque or stone commemorating her presence here. Seems egotistical, but reality is when doing genealogy, many people refer to grave sites for reference of dates, family, spouses, children etc. I would like a plaque on my parents joint stone or a stone nearby. Just to make it easier for people to find me! :huh:

While we did toss everyone overboard in one manner or another (plane, boat) we left a plaque affixed to a boulder to commemorate our dad.  

 

Personally I'm leaning toward being tossed to the breezes.  I plan on coming back anyways as I am sure I still have some karma to work off, and I don't want to have my old ashes affixed to a broken piece of pottery or on a shelf in someone's storage unit who has no clue who I was.  Or worse, have strangers dump me out because they have no clue who I was and are tired of the responsibility of watching over me and keeping me dusted.

 

 

I can't begin to imagine why anyone would want a potful of ashes on the mantelshelf.  Maybe that's because all but two of those closest to me are still here, and the two I lost were an aunt and her grand-daughter, so their ashes (they were both buried) were not mine to "do with".

 

For myself I really don't care.  Once I'm gone, I'm gone.  For my parents and partner, I don't want to have to do something with the ashes, nor do I want somewhere specific to go to remember them.  My own garden contains plants propagated from my parents and favourite aunts gardens, so I can remember them there, or anywhere with plants.

 

When my mum-out-law died, we went back to the crem to place her ashes with her sister, but it wasn't allowed and Papa J was more distressed after the "ceremony" than he was before.  So, my ashes can stay in the big kiln forever.


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#31 Mark C.

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 01:06 AM

This is very much a personal choice as what to do with ashes-I respect anyones choice and they all differ.
We as a family spread them in places that meant something to each person who life it was. We wait one year from death to do this. I have done this 4 times with my family. Just have a sister left  as I'm the youngest so next time its her or me doing it.

We spread my fathers ashes at sea in the 60's when that was illegal  as one could not to have them anywhere except in a cemetery. We had a cript in name only for some years until our state made ashes legal to spread in public places like the sea.

My brothers (1970) are in a small creek on forest service land in a remote area thats runs to the sea.

My mother's ashes are off the channel Islands off california coast

My  other brothers ashs (1993) are in a famous fly fishing section of river in Idaho which flows to the sea.

Mine will be in the ocean on the tuna grounds  about 30-40 miles offshore.

I never need to travel to these places as Just the thought of rivers and ocean is enough

I spread some of my cats ashes into the garden each year as they liked to rest in the summer shade there. They will all be gone soon and the urns will be empty.

I make a ceramic plaque for all my cats over the past 40 years which hangs on a tree in the side yard but not any plaques for humans.

Its a personal choice.

These people live on in our memorys until we are are just memorys.

Mark 


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#32 What?

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 07:33 AM

Lidded vessel=$$ Urn=$$$$. I make urns but lidded vessels are ok too. 

 

Those of you who may consider making urns. A few tips. Some people do not want to open the bag of ashes so make sure the opening is wide enough to accept the ashes. Make a good lid; one with a flange and rests on  gallery. A tip to the side or a bumpy road and poor lid and a grieving family; not good. Make sure the urn is large enough. First one was for our friend Darlene barely got all of the ashes in. My wife just about died as we neared the top pushing and tucking her in there right before the memorial.

 

I have never accepted money from family members or friends.



#33 Amy Eberhardt

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 08:19 AM

<snip>

I make a ceramic plaque for all my cats over the past 40 years which hangs on a tree in the side yard but not any plaques for humans.

I love this idea Mark!

 

Some here already know of my love for my chickens. In the nearly 10 years of keeping them, I've lost quite a few. Sadly, chickens just don't have that long of a life span. :( I have one specific spot, out in the woods of our property, where I lay to rest those girls who have passed of natural causes. I have long lamented that I had nothing suitable to mark their final resting place. Thanks for giving me a great means to address that lack, Mark. :wub:



#34 Benzine

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 09:15 AM

I still like the idea, of using some of the "creamains" in a glaze.


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#35 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 11:15 AM

I made my frist urn recently.  I am getting ready to decorate it now. My 12 yr old nephew just passed away last week and the thought of making urns actually helps me feel comfort.  He was not cremated so I did not make an urn for him.  Attached File  urn .jpg   37.29KB   0 downloads


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"To me the greatest thing is to live beauty in our daily life and to crowd every moment with things of beauty.  It is then, and then only that  the art of the people as a whole is endowed with it's richest significance.  For it's products are those made by great a many craftsmen for the mass of the people, and the moment this art declines the life of the nation  is removed far away from beauty.  So long as beauty abides in only in a few articles created by a few geniuses, the kingdom of beauty is nowhere near realization."                                                                                 - Bernard Leach 

#36 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 11:41 AM

Of course it is a very personal decision of how we want to be buried: in an urn, as an ash glaze, as a future tree, whatever. I think it is important that we think about it at all, and not only when we are 100+ years old.

 

Pres: I understand very well what you mean in urging your wife having a plaque somewhere. But aren't we just thinking for the ones that survive us? Maybe they don't want to come to X or Y or Z to bring flowers or some such? Or do we want to stay just a bit longer in the memory of others, reminding them with a plaque? Just a thought!

 

Benzine: I wonder: are you talking of the cremains of your loved ones, or are you thinking of telling another ceramist that, after you died, he/she should do the ash glaze with your ashes? And maybe that wouldn't be easy at all, to find somebody who will really do it (remember, you can't check.. ;) )

 

Rebekah: again, my deepest felt condolences. He died way too young.

Did you make that urn to practise, or will you make more and sell them to funeral homes? Think of what forum member What? wrote about the size of the urn and also of the lid....

 

What?: welcome to the forum! Thanks for your thoughts here. Would you mind filling in your profile page, so that we at least know where you come from? We like to hear more from you.

 

Thank you all again for your thoughts. Keep them coming!

 

Evelyne


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#37 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 12:45 PM

It was a practice to see if I can do it. I plan to make more because I enjoyed it.


~ Namaste ~

 

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"To me the greatest thing is to live beauty in our daily life and to crowd every moment with things of beauty.  It is then, and then only that  the art of the people as a whole is endowed with it's richest significance.  For it's products are those made by great a many craftsmen for the mass of the people, and the moment this art declines the life of the nation  is removed far away from beauty.  So long as beauty abides in only in a few articles created by a few geniuses, the kingdom of beauty is nowhere near realization."                                                                                 - Bernard Leach 

#38 Benzine

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 07:39 PM

Evelyne,

 

I just like the idea of using cremation ash in glazes.  If my family would want me to do it, for one of our relatives, I would definitely do so.  I can't say I'd expect anyone to do it with my ashes.  I could demand it, and if they didn't I'd just haunt them...  Of course if they did do it, having my remains in glazed items, I may haunt them that way too...


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#39 TJR

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 08:25 PM

Evelyne,

 

I just like the idea of using cremation ash in glazes.  If my family would want me to do it, for one of our relatives, I would definitely do so.  I can't say I'd expect anyone to do it with my ashes.  I could demand it, and if they didn't I'd just haunt them...  Of course if they did do it, having my remains in glazed items, I may haunt them that way too...

I guess you can't make your own ash glaze.

Tom.



#40 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 23 March 2015 - 01:14 PM

I made one for my son who was killed 2 years ago.  It's not your usual urn.  He always lived in not so good apartments, so I made him a castle with things that he enjoyed painted on it, and his picture on top.  When it comes time to bury him (if I ever get to that point) my husband will make a wooden box to put the urn in. I found comfort in it, but I don't think I would make one for anyone else.

what a beautiful tribute to your son 


~ Namaste ~

 

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"To me the greatest thing is to live beauty in our daily life and to crowd every moment with things of beauty.  It is then, and then only that  the art of the people as a whole is endowed with it's richest significance.  For it's products are those made by great a many craftsmen for the mass of the people, and the moment this art declines the life of the nation  is removed far away from beauty.  So long as beauty abides in only in a few articles created by a few geniuses, the kingdom of beauty is nowhere near realization."                                                                                 - Bernard Leach 





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