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Red Rocks

Moving Down The Pyrometer To Cone 5/6

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I have always done cone 10/11 in gas or wood.  About a year ago I took a workshop on Cone 5/6 glazes and have been experimenting ever since.  I have developed a number of mid-range glazes along with slips and washes that are really awesome.  I also bought two electric kilns to support my new passion.  However I still have a large Cone 10 gas kiln that I still periodically fire to cone 10 reduction. 

 
I want to test firing the gas kiln in oxidation to cone 6, so I can utilize the kiln more often and fire more pieces for less money.  Do you have any idea how close I can come to creating the same glaze results in the gas kiln as to what I am getting in the electric kilns?  I have done some research on this but have not been able to find any definitive answers and hate to risk a whole kiln load without having a better understanding of the likely results.

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One thing I remembered about ^6 vs ^10 was that brighter colors were lots easier to achieve. :) I found a few glorious recipes (and a few awful ones--my friend called this one burgundy "blood earwax," hahaha!!), but really it depends on what sort of ^10 look you're trying to get. Tenmoku? Shino? Soda? So many possibilities. :)

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I fired ^6 reduction for 20 years and glazes were not distinguishable from ^10- tenmoku, copper reds, celadon, etc.Saves a lot of energy.

Some glazes will be different definitely. like the coppers.

I used different recipes for Ox. and reduction except for a nice matt

Marcia Selsor’s

^6 Reduction Semi Matt

EPK 23

Dolomite 20

Neph. Syen. 38

Silica 18

Whiting 4

Ger, Borate 10

113

Takes colors well but these are for reduction.

 

Blue/lavender 1% cobalt Carb

Light green 1.5% Nickel Carb

1.5% Rutile

Lt. Blue gray .5% cobalt carb.

2.5% rutile

gray 2.5 rutile +2.5 nickel carb.

 

 

Marcia

Cavy Fire Studios likes this

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John Britt's new book on mid-fire glazes (cones 4 to 6) include a number of recipes for cone 6 oxidation and reduction in atmosphere (including a generous handful attributed to Marcia Selsor).  That might be a good starting point. 

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I do change them to 100% for my recipe box. This one was changed from ^9 to ^6 by adding 10% Gerstley Borate.

To get it to 100 divide all the ingredient portions by 113.Don't change the addition of the colorants. This glaze is very receptive to color variations. Great for experiment for new colors.

I just got this from one of my ^6 recipe pages on my computer. Somewhere on another page it has been converted. I didn't notice it had not been converted when I posted it.

 

Thanks Old lady for catching my typo.

 

 

Marcia

David Woodin likes this

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Thank you Marcia, for the explanation.  I changed it to 100% and than rounded the results to one decimal point and came up with 99.9% which hardly made any change to the original formula.  Next step is for me to try it on my clay.

David 

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