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Wowee, thank you all so much!! ^_^ ♥ My dang stupid back is causing me a whole slough of grief today, so seeing such kind words really cheered up poor Guinea. ♥

I charge $125 for these, though that'll increase exponentially, once I get some in that snazzy gallery. I was thinking $300-$400 ish. They are a metric butt-ton of work and physical discomfort!

This was my very first time making patterns! I'm so happy everyone likes them--I think I'm gonna make lots more pattern/animal work in the future. I LOVE the contrast of simple lines/color with the detailed center image. ♥ My fave is the chubby holland lop in the upper left! :)

florence w likes this

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Bunnies! :D These are so well done! I'm especially drawn to the patterns on the top left and bottom right plates - love the bold colors and how precise and clean the lines are. Fantastic work!

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Sure! What I do is wait until the ware is bone dry. Then, I draw the image on with pencil, since the graphite will just burn out. The third step is adding the color--I usually paint the backgrounds first. :3 I use a combination of Mason stains (gerstley borate for flux), Duncan underglazes, Mayco underglazes, and Clay Art Center's too. The last step is adding the black lines. I used Amaco's black Velvet Underglaze for the buns and flowers, since it is a lot softer and has a nice gradient range. Great for shading! The patterns have Clay Art Center's Baltic Black A for lines. It's hands down the BOLDEST black underglaze I've ever used, and it makes for crisp, sharp lines like no other. Great stuff--spendy, though. :)

 

As for physical therapy, bit of a catch 22 there. I gotta drive there, but I can't drive, haha! SO...nope. *sigh*

 

EDIT:

Okay, guys, enough with the rabbit trolling. These buns are a nice lady's beloved companions, and I, myself, have eight house rabbits that I love as family. Please be nice. :(

florence w likes this

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Ohhhh, if you are using mason stains, you gotta use a flux to get it all nice and melty so it doesn't refract and get icky. The ratio depends on the stain you use. The easiest thing would be to get pre-made colors--more expensive, but a LOT less hassle! :) Duncan is the best all-round underglaze. ^_^

Oh, I use gerstley borate for my flux. ♥

mtnmud likes this

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You might consider using a different height work surface. Either use chocks to raise the table you have now or change your chair height. Perhaps sitting on a balance ball, even. If you have a variety of heights available, you can move around as you work. If you work standing already, get some good floor mats.

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As for physical therapy, bit of a catch 22 there. I gotta drive there, but I can't drive, haha! SO...nope. *sigh*

 

 

You only need to get there once and get the exercises, then you can practice them in your own home. Luckily my mum is a physio so I get free advice, and a slap if I slouch too much  :huh:

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I crown you "Underglaze Rock Star"...admiring the work AND the patience it takes to do this.  Be sure to post the final product, ok?

 

I am not a physical therapist, but have been doing PT for a back injury for more years than I want to mention.  There are stretching exercises that will help, but my best advice is a 15 minute kitchen timer...set it. work for 15 minutes. get off your bun-nies, walk/stretch/move for 5 minutes...wash/rinse/repeat.  Sitting for long stretches of time is simply one of the worst things that you can do for a back problem.

 

Really nice work!

-Paul

Chilly and florence w like this

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The depiction of a person, meticulously, feverishly working, usually conjures images of that person hunched over. For whatever reason, I think it's true. I know I have a tendency to do so, when I'm working in an area for a while, especially when I need to be stable. I imagine this is the case for such in depth, technical illustrations.

 

Do you work on them flat, or prop them up. If you could do the latter more, you could keep your spine straightened out, and help yourself, in the long run.

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