Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
kelleyisfj

Water Filtration

Recommended Posts

Hi, I am setting up a small studio in my condo and know that something has to be done with the water I use. I really can't just dump it out off my balcony. I used to work in a large studio and they had a contraption set up under the sink but I really can't do that. So far I've been putting the water in a bucket, letting the water settle and pouring the top water into the kitchen sink. That still leaves water with clay particles and slurry at the bottom. Would appreciate suggestions.

Thanks,

Kathleen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, I am setting up a small studio in my condo and know that something has to be done with the water I use. I really can't just dump it out off my balcony. I used to work in a large studio and they had a contraption set up under the sink but I really can't do that. So far I've been putting the water in a bucket, letting the water settle and pouring the top water into the kitchen sink. That still leaves water with clay particles and slurry at the bottom. Would appreciate suggestions.

Thanks,

Kathleen

 

 

Not sure if this works because I've only been working at home for 7 or 8 months or so but I clear as much clay out of my buckets and splash pan as I can then use one of the glaze sieves with a fine mesh and pour the clay water into that while it's in the sink. Any lumps left stay in the sieve and I can scrap them out, the water runs through and some of the really small stuff turns to a very fine sand which I think is okay to flush down the drain and won't clog the pipes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been doing this for many years ...

 

I have a large bucket that sits in my sink that I use throughout the day to clean up, the clay settles really quickly so the water that overflows is usually clear.

I keep the drain opening covered with an old t shirt or towel so any water that overflows has to go through it as a filter.

 

At night, I let the clay water settle.

In the morning, I cover my drain with an old towel or t shirt and pour the clearest water through it.

It drains slowly and catches a lot of the smaller particles.

 

I put the thick bottom stuff in an old pail to dry out, then just put it out in the yard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been doing this for many years ...

 

I have a large bucket that sits in my sink that I use throughout the day to clean up, the clay settles really quickly so the water that overflows is usually clear.

I keep the drain opening covered with an old t shirt or towel so any water that overflows has to go through it as a filter.

 

At night, I let the clay water settle.

In the morning, I cover my drain with an old towel or t shirt and pour the clearest water through it.

It drains slowly and catches a lot of the smaller particles.

 

I put the thick bottom stuff in an old pail to dry out, then just put it out in the yard.

 

 

Oh I like the idea of fabric. Never really thought of that and I should of because I also bake and have used cloth often to add spices to mixtures when you want the flavor but not the actual spice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since I don't have easy access to a sink I'm really careful about how much clay goes into the water bowl at my wheel. I keep any trimming, cut off, so on to the side of the bowl and that goes into a recycling bucket. I use a two bucket system for the water. I have a 5 gallon bucket with a few bricks stacked inside. On top of the bricks is a smaller bucket with holes punched all around it starting about 4 inches from the bottom. I used an awl. I pour my waste water into the small bucket which catches the heavier/larger clay waste. Once the 5 gallon bucket fills to the base of the smaller bucket I pour that water through a glaze seive lined with cheese cloth. At that point it can go down the drain but during the summer I use it in my garden and flower pots. Every so often I scrape out the slurry from both buckets, let it dry and toss out under the trees. Since you're in a condo I supose once dry you could dispose it in the trash. It is biodegradable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use my studio basically only as a pottery studio and I have 55 gal drum sunk into the ground just outside the studio that the sink drains into and then I have a pipe at the top of the drum so that when the water gets higer than the pipe it flows out. Every once in a while I get ambitious and muck the clay out of the bottom of the drum. Since the system drains outdoors I don't really pay too much attention to it but it does seem to be effective (there is always. My system works kind of like a huge "p" trap. I've also seen a deice that replaces the "p" trap in your sink that is suitable for an apartment. In the ad the system attaches to the tailpiece on the sink and then the drain into the wall but it has an enlarged "p" and it can be unscrewed and drained. To me the commercila system looks like it would be convenient but Chris' system seems like the simplest and most cost-effective and really hard to beat.

 

Regards,

Charles

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, I am setting up a small studio in my condo and know that something has to be done with the water I use. I really can't just dump it out off my balcony. I used to work in a large studio and they had a contraption set up under the sink but I really can't do that. So far I've been putting the water in a bucket, letting the water settle and pouring the top water into the kitchen sink. That still leaves water with clay particles and slurry at the bottom. Would appreciate suggestions.

Thanks,

Kathleen

 

 

I have a fairly complicated 3- 5 gallon settling system that works well but I still consider the bucket in my sink the heart of the system. I let the bucket fill up during the day while I'm working and let it settle over night. In the morning I pour the settle water down the drain into my settling buckets and start over again. You do have to clean slurry out of the bucket but it's a small price to pay to keep you plumbing clean. I don't have to be as carefull as I am with my settling system but I worked with a bucket alone for twenty years and old habits are hard to break. Denice (Wichita, KS)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This was an excellent post and so timely. On the same line I would like to know about laundering. Do any of you have problems w/washing your clay clothes, aprons, towels, rags, etc. in your personal washer/dryers. When I wash my regular dark clothes a whitish residue ends up on them. Don't know if it is from the washer or dryer. Would like to hear some input on this. Thanks for all the wise counsel on this forum. Cyndi.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This was an excellent post and so timely. On the same line I would like to know about laundering. Do any of you have problems w/washing your clay clothes, aprons, towels, rags, etc. in your personal washer/dryers. When I wash my regular dark clothes a whitish residue ends up on them. Don't know if it is from the washer or dryer. Would like to hear some input on this. Thanks for all the wise counsel on this forum. Cyndi.

 

 

My studio towels get so chunky with clay, I'm scared to put them in my own laundry machines! Once a year, I take my pile of clay-covered towels to a local laundromat. This is a really big laundromat with dozens of laundry machines running 24 hours a day, so their drains are always moving. I know other pottery studios who use the same laundromat. So far, they haven't told us that the clay is causing any problems.

 

Mea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×