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Mouten Keramik

How To Make Size Apparent In Photos

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My wife has been telling me for the past couple of photo shoots that she thinks it would be difficult to gauge the size of the pieces being a stranger having only the photos as a reference. While I also provide basic measurements (height and width), I feel she has a good point, and want to find a clever way to make size more apparent in the photos of my pieces.

 

So far I haven't got much experience selling my pieces, but the couple of markets I did attended, made it apparent that people like the things I make, and are willing to spend the price I'm asking. I'm trying to beef up my digital presence, and sell my pieces online. This is why the point above is important. Ceramics is something that you really need to hold in your hands in order to decide whether or not you like it. This cannot be done in the digital space, but I want to make an effort and offer my customers something that comes as close to it as possible. 

 

Do you guys have any tips on how to make size apparent in photos?

 

(Oh, and I attached a picture, just to show you how I usually do things)

post-65534-0-27572800-1421788010_thumb.jpg

post-65534-0-27572800-1421788010_thumb.jpg

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Depending on what it is, functional or non, you could put a related object with it. A coffee mug, could have a spoon sticking out of it, or a teabag tag, hanging over the edge. A pitcher could have some lemons, or other such fruit sitting near it. A vase could have flowers in it.

 

Just my thoughts.

 

Also, great piece in the photo!

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If these photos are for your web site put a known size coin in them - or as a stated above a ruler in larger pieces.

If on the other hand they are for juried shows or the like do not put anything for scale as this distracts from content

Mark

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I would say, take pictures of your pots in real life. Kind of still-life style (not Pinterest style though, if you see what I mean). I know that personally, I like photos of things in a context rather than just on a blank screen. It doesn't need to be complicated, even seeing a piece of textile that one can identify as a tea towel or a curtain or whatever can give an idea of the size of your piece.

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In the description you could also add the volume in liters or whatever measurents you use.

I really do not like a ruler or coin in photo.

My guess is your cup holds 8-10 ounces .

Ceramics is a hold in your hand deal-that said between the measurements and volume you describe I think thats enough.

I have my volumes stated on my web site for mugs.

All other items in a photo detract for me and the public will never really get it anyway until they have their hands on it.

No need to overthink this.

Mark

ChenowethArts likes this

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https://blog.etsy.com/en/2013/the-seller-handbook-archive/

 

I remember all the rules they told me in art school about taking beautiful shots for applications to galleries, shows and grants. They make for a really lovely image that showcases your work, and your work only. You have a handle on how to do this well

 

The advice out there for taking a good set of product shots for online sales breaks almost every last one of those rules. But you can still get some nice, if less formal shots following this advice.

 

Say what you will about Etsy, they do know a thing or two about online marketing, and they give you lots of free information about taking good product shots. Their Seller's Handbook (link above) recommends 4-5 shots, all from different angles, and one of which that should be a "lifestyle shot." So about 3-4 like you're used to, but with different angles, and one of your mug in action, half full of tea with a sudoku and a pencil.

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I used to sell a lot on eBay, years ago. I found that a great description to go along with the pictures did wonders towards selling the item. Granted, I was selling antiques and collectibles, but the principle is the same. People like to know a bit about the item, as well as the person selling it. This is why people like to buy ceramics at shows. They make a stronger connection with the piece when they have the opportunity to meet its creator.

 

In the digital realm, you can help your potential buyer to make that connection through your description. Tell them a bit about yourself, as well as your processes in transforming that lump of nondescript mud into a work of art. Give them some glimpse into your world. The potential buyers who are well versed in pottery will find common ground with you, while the completely clueless will gain a greater appreciation for your work.  ;)  Best of luck........

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Thanks for all the excellent suggestions.

 

Like you Mark C., I'm not crazy about obfuscating the photos with other objects - but maybe one of the photos could show measurements.

 

I was actually thinking that maybe perspective and blank space could be used to make size more apparent. The picture in the original post is actually og a 22 cm tall vase.

 

And thanks for the suggestion about description, Amy. I find it a bit difficult to write something about each piece. I'll probably try to focus a bit more on story-telling and describing the process behind each piece.

 

I'll ask the wife and see if she is willing, Clayhouse :)

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I usually do three things...

 

If it is an item that is normally held in a hand... like a bowl or cup, I often shoot one photo holding it.

 

Secondly, I provide in product description a volume in ounces, if appropriate (like cup or bowl... not colander)

 

Thirdly, I provide measurements of height and width in the product description too.

 

I agree with many people above, I find rulers distracting! :-)  Karan

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If I want to show size, I take the image into  Photoshop  or Gimp and  enlarge the canvas with a little at the bottom, then add the size and if needed the volume. Then whenever the picture is posted the size shows up. In my blog, description properties are built in so I don't have to do this for it.

sddonlon likes this

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I like it when the piece in question is put into perspective with the objects they would be used for. For example : your vase would have flowers in it, a colander might have fruit( spaghetti wouldn't be fun) and veggies, a mug shot in the hand. The other photos I like are group shots done in the shop, showing the hand madeness of it all.the gallery shots are great, but I feel that the person who buys pottery to use it needs different visuals than the person who buys pottery to display it. Jolie

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I have used a coin, a lemon near a large bowl ( i thought maybe it's good fen shui to use the lemon)

I like the idea of a lemon!

 

FWIW, I initially thought the watermark in the photo was a marble and my first thought was that this was a great idea. Very simple, nice shape and makes it fairly easy to estimate size.

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