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Cowgirl1959

Best Stool,chair For Throwing And Glazing

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Hi all,

 I am new to the forum and hope you don't mind my jumping in with a question. I am fairly new to pottery and have tried a couple of different kinds of chairs and stools for throwing and glazing (I sit for hours because I hand paint or have to hand layer Potter Choice glazes with a brush)  but each has left me with back pain. I have used a low potters stool with the very slight back on it, a totally backless stationary stool and recently bought a kind of hairdressers stool which is adjustable height and has a back on it but I am still suffering with a lot of pain. What do you use?

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for throwing, I use a five wheeled secretary chair that has a small springy back. I have a stiff wire coming forward from the frame that has a loop on it.  I made a stiff wire hook on the front of my wheel frame.

 

When I'm centering and need to have my rear planted solidly, I hook the wire on my chair to the hook on the front of my wheel. At all other times, I unhook my chair from the wheel.
This allows me to to roll around short distances to grab tools etc. The flexible back of the secretary chair gives me support in a number of positions without restricting my movement. 

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Hi all,

I sit for hours because I hand paint or have to hand layer Potter Choice glazes with a brush)  but each has left me with back pain. I have used a low potters stool with the very slight back on it, a totally backless stationary stool and recently bought a kind of hairdressers stool which is adjustable height and has a back on it but I am still suffering with a lot of pain. What do you use?

There are a few solutions to this sort of problem. 1) use the stool at different heights throughout your work period. This will help to change pressure points along the spine. 2)force yourself to get up every 30 minutes or so and walk around, do a little wedging or some other physical activity. 3) get into yoga, or some other exercise that helps to align the back and strengthen muscles. I do a simple thing-hang from an overhead bar by the hands, and wiggle the hips-this will help to align the vertebrae, strengthen the arms and the back/shoulders. A few minutes a day can to wonders when done a few seconds several times a day.

 

All of us deal with pain, and soreness. There are two types of soreness, one is from inactivity or poor activity, the other is the burn from having a good workout that lasts for a day or two.

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Hey there;

Welcome to the forum. We dealt with this ish in a previous post, but you would not have seen it. I used Harriet's hardwood dining room chair for 26 years. When I left that studio, she asked for it back. Apparently, it was part of a set of four.

Two things about your post jump out for me;

1. low body position.

2."I sit for hours"

When I built my new studio, I raised my wheel up by one brick. My chair is a lower hard wood chair with a back. I have about 5 wooden bats on it and then a piece of foam. What I like about it is that it does not have wheels, and stays put unless I want to move it.

2. Do not sit for hours. Go look out the window. Stretch. Do something else for 15 minutes. Move around.

I am celebrating my 40th year making pots. Unfortunately, I wore out my right hip. It is now made out of titanium. It is a pain going through customs. Shoulda raised my wheel sooner.

TJR.

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Thanks all for the tips. I guess the moving around part is the most important. I have started setting the timer on my phone for 30 minutes so I will remember to get up. I do have an adjustable chair but I think I may try the raising my wheel thingy as well. Happy potting!

 

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One aspect of my day job is advising clients on proper ergonomics. The advice to get up and move around every 30 minutes is good. Try some stretching exercises, too. I know some potters find relief in doing their work standing up.  You can buy boots, leg extensions, or use cement blocks to raise the height of your wheel. You may find you need to readjust your technique slightly but that's not a bad thing.

 

If you need to sit at times then get a tall stool with a foot rung.  One with pneumatic height adjustment and a foot ring is ideal. Google "ergonomic lab stools" to find a decent one. Sometimes you can find them with glides in place of casters (or follow Docweathers' creative lead on using a wire hook).  Make sure the seat height adjustment range coordinates with the height you choose for your wheel. For general work a seat 10-12" lower than the top of your work surface is recommended though you'll probably want it a little higher if you intend to throw while seated.

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I use a simple stool that I made. I added about a one inch bar to the back legs that is attached by hinges. When the bar is down the effect is to tip me forward into the wheel. This reduces back strain. If this description is not clear pull up the stool marketed by shimpo and you will see the concept. John

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When I first got a wheel at home I used a beat up igloo cooler temporarily before I bought a stool.  Well that was in 1997.  I am still using it.  When I am attaching handles or carving detail into the leather hard clay I put an upside down 5 gallon bucket on the wheel so the work is close to eye level.  The cooler also makes a great step stool.  I think the big issue with the right chair is the need to stretch/ exercise your back.   I enjoy going to the gym several times a week and I know that helps.

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post-16841-0-82641500-1428157637_thumb.jpg

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