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Pit Fire Poo

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I know that cow and buffalo poo is most favored for pit firing, but...I have A FREAKING TON of rabbit poo. I know it's tiny poo, but I have so much of it, and since cows and bunners eat the same things, if I layer them up thick, do you think it might work? Just a thought! :)

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Can't hurt to try.

 

They do eat the same thing, but digest that food differently, as cows, and other such animals, have multi-sectioned stomachs. So a cow pie is dense, and had much of the water and nutrients removed. That's why it burns well. But dry the bunny pellets, and it should give sime interesting effects.

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So the curator of the Art Spirit has offered to represent

your art and its driven you to fire pottery with Lepus

poo! ;-)

I d use the manure as à reduction agent on pottery. I found

out years ago that absolute dry manure resulted in very

black pottery. Manure you think is dry will result in

mottled finishes. (There seems to be enough moisture to

cool pottery making the surface gray.) Manure is better

than leaves because leaves will burst into flames if

they aren't covered with sand/loose dirt in 2 or 3 seconds.

Manure will turn the ceramics black then smolder.

 

Congratulations on the Art Spirit connection. Can't

wait for the day you send Beth Caventer Stichter an invite

to your exhibit!

 

Alabama

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Well, it wasn't the curator, but someone who works for him and wants to put in a good word for me. :) She is she mayor of Athol, Idaho! Heehee...I bet my landlord would kill me for pit-firing in my backyard... :D

Bunny poo is very, very dry. They eat the mush poo as a means of recycling for yummy nutrients, whereas cows barf it up, chew, and swallow. :D Bunny poo looks like Cocoa Puffs, and seeing how I have eight buns, there's a LOT of poo for me to mess with! :D I bet I could use their dirty pine litter box shavings as combustibles, too. :3 Never done it before, but what the heck? ^_^

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I can't speak to the burning quality of bunny scat, but there is a difference between horse and cow manure. Cow pies should be very dry..frisbee quality. Horse turds are more cubic and have a higher nitrogen content. The horse turds are good for adding to saggar or trash can burns for good blacks. When I fired class loads of work , our pit was about 8-10 ft. long, 3 feet wide and about 30 inches deep with a ledge about 10" up from the bottom to support grills or metal refrigerator shelfs.The fire and built up coals were on the bottom.

Bunny poo mixed with pine may work in a pit or also you could try it on a trash can or a brick above ground "pit". The pine shavings will help the burn.

 

Marcia

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I can't speak to the burning quality of bunny scat, but there is a difference between horse and cow manure. Cow pies should be very dry..frisbee quality. Horse turds are more cubic and have a higher nitrogen content. The horse turds are good for adding to saggar or trash can burns for good blacks. When I fired class loads of work , our pit was about 8-10 ft. long, 3 feet wide and about 30 inches deep with a ledge about 10" up from the bottom to support grills or metal refrigerator shelfs.The fire and built up coals were on the bottom.

Bunny poo mixed with pine may work in a pit or also you could try it on a trash can or a brick above ground "pit". The pine shavings will help the burn.

 

Marcia

And Marcia knows her scat.

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Living in Montana and being surrounded by ranches or wilderness does expose one to scat of all types. And when I was in Uzbekistan, shepherds take sheep scat, mild it into large 20" or so pie pans and dry it along fences in the sun. They use it as their main fuel for heating and cooking. It is a valuable resource. I have thought about using deer scat and thought about miniature pit firings. But never followed up. There was a great thread on Clayart years ago about horse during enhanced sawdust...but that is a whole other topic.

Marcia

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I will be the first rabbit poo pioneer!!! You just wait!

...err...I better ask the landlord, first...

 

But hey! Check THIS out--rabbit poop totally kills the competition! Ooooh, I'm excited now...

 

N = Nitrogen %          P = Phosphorus  %          K = Potassium%

 

Material                          N                P               K       

 

Rabbit Manure             2.4           1.4             0.6  

 

Chicken Manure          1.6            1.5             0.9

 

Cow Manure                 0.6            0.2             0.5

 

Horse Manure              0.7            0.2             0.6

 

Pig Manure                    0.5            0.3             0.5

 

Sheep Manure              0.7            0.3             0.9

 

Duck Manure                 0.6            1.4             0.5

 

Worm Castings             0.5            0.5             0.3

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Didja know that rabbit poo is "cold" fertilizer, so you don't have to compost it? You just toss it right in! It's the best for reviving nutrient-deficient soil. Makes it nice and yummy for veggies, and flowers just LOVE rabbit poo "tea." Sure as heck beats Miracle Grow--I get it for free! :D

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Hi from Japan. I am not sure where to post this question: I wonder if there is anyone at this site with experience using various types of manure for their firing. I am familiar with cow dung firing (recalling one memorable incident being chased by a bull while I was gathering fuel in his field... Just made it over the fence with a pile of "stuff" under my arm), but I wonder about the chemical aspects of using, say, chicken manure, etc.  I see in the list above that chicken manure has a high rating regarding chemical value, so I also wonder if it is mixed with sawdust during the firing, or whether it is used by itself.  

Thank you for your time, and I look forward to any enlightenment you can send my way (including advice on where else I might post this query).

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