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Low Fire Clay


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#1 LeePottery

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 03:38 PM

I've been using a low fire clay that I buy from a local art supply store but I've read recently that low fire clay is not as durable as cone 6 clay or higher and that it is more porous. Can anyone tell me if low fire clay is safe to use as tableware and if there is any significant difference in durability between low fire and higher firing clays. Thanks.

#2 savant

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Posted 07 May 2010 - 09:44 PM

low fire clay is safe to use as tableware if it is glazed, other wise it is porous and could harbor bacteria. Low fire clays are less durable than high fire clays.

#3 hansen

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Posted 13 May 2010 - 04:30 PM

I've been using a low fire clay that I buy from a local art supply store but I've read recently that low fire clay is not as durable as cone 6 clay or higher and that it is more porous. Can anyone tell me if low fire clay is safe to use as tableware and if there is any significant difference in durability between low fire and higher firing clays. Thanks.


I have several items in the kitchen made from low fire white from Georgie's which I also had Georgie's glaze and fire, I think they used a commercial Duncan clear. You have to fully dip the pieces and set them up on stilts. Then 100% of the surface is covered with glaze; fired without crazing they are completely waterproof and go through the dishwasher just fine. With the proper glazing of these wares, they ring like stoneware.
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#4 hansen

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Posted 14 May 2010 - 03:44 PM

I googled "stilts for pottery" with good results. you can see an image at:
http://www.baileypot...ture/stilts.htm
Also there is a kind with a kanthol wire core that works just fine. They will leave small marks on the bottom of the pot (remember you want to glaze that too - 100% coverage - so you have to plan for those marks in you design. Lowfire white is usually made with 60% ball clay and 40% talc and will become a glaze at high temperature, melting in the kiln, destroying shelves and soft brick. Be careful firing the stuff.
Also you can use low-fire casting slip to achieve slip-trail decoration as an added feature, and if lowfire red casting slip is available you can slip trail with that too. Some greenware painters love the slip trail lines, it's like coloring in a coloring book. Does this help?
h a n s e n


I've been using a low fire clay that I buy from a local art supply store but I've read recently that low fire clay is not as durable as cone 6 clay or higher and that it is more porous. Can anyone tell me if low fire clay is safe to use as tableware and if there is any significant difference in durability between low fire and higher firing clays. Thanks.


I have several items in the kitchen made from low fire white from Georgie's which I also had Georgie's glaze and fire, I think they used a commercial Duncan clear. You have to fully dip the pieces and set them up on stilts. Then 100% of the surface is covered with glaze; fired without crazing they are completely waterproof and go through the dishwasher just fine. With the proper glazing of these wares, they ring like stoneware.
h a n s e n




h a n s e n
Stone House Studio, Alexandria, Virginia

americanpotter.blogspot.com
thesuddenschool.blogspot.com

#5 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 01:05 PM

low fire clay is safe to use as tableware if it is glazed, other wise it is porous and could harbor bacteria. Low fire clays are less durable than high fire clays.


If the earthenware is fired to vitrification it is fine. But you have to test it to see.
If using it for majolica or sculpture, firing it to ^02 before glazing may help.
Here is a good reference from Linda Arbuckle.
http://lindaarbuckle...earthenware.pdf




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