Jump to content


Photo

Looking For A ^6 Brown Formula


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Pam S

Pam S

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 148 posts
  • LocationDurham, NC

Posted 11 January 2011 - 01:31 PM

I'm looking for something rich that will break over texture. We're firing ^6 oxidation. Does anyone have a formula they are willing to share? Thanks!


"Saving just one dog won't change the world, but it surely will change the world for that one dog."


#2 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,033 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 11 January 2011 - 06:09 PM

I'm looking for something rich that will break over texture. We're firing ^6 oxidation. Does anyone have a formula they are willing to share? Thanks!



Cream Rust Compound Empirical 50 75 Custer Feldspar 26.6 1330 1995 Strontium 3.3 165 247.5 Talc 2.3 115 172.5 EPK 8.4 420 630 Silica-Flint 18.2 910 1365 3134 30.6 1530 2295 Wallostonite 10.6 530 795 Total in grams 100 5000 7500 red iron oxide 6 300 450 Tin oxide 13 650 975 Van Gilder As shown this is from Van Gilder's pottery book, I like all of his glazes. The above glaze is brown when thinner, cream when thicker. breaks over texture. Works well with other glazes.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#3 Pam S

Pam S

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 148 posts
  • LocationDurham, NC

Posted 11 January 2011 - 06:43 PM

It sounds lovely but I'm a bit confused by the formula. Is Cream Rust Compound Emperical 50 75 the name? Also, the amount of Silica shows 5 different gram amounts. Thanks for the formula!

"Saving just one dog won't change the world, but it surely will change the world for that one dog."


#4 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,033 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 11 January 2011 - 10:27 PM

It sounds lovely but I'm a bit confused by the formula. Is Cream Rust Compound Emperical 50 75 the name? Also, the amount of Silica shows 5 different gram amounts. Thanks for the formula!


Sorry it is confusing. I copied it from an excel web sheet that I have set up of all of my glazes. I use the empirical, use 50 for a multiplier that gives a 5000g batch, then use 75 for a multiplier for a 7500g batch. I do it this way since if I need more or less I just change the multiplier. In most cases it is just to mix a smaller container, and a larger one. So for each compound you should get the first number that when all are added=100(excluding the oxides). The second number is for the 5000 g. batch, and the third for a 7500 g batch.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#5 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,033 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 11 January 2011 - 10:29 PM


It sounds lovely but I'm a bit confused by the formula. Is Cream Rust Compound Emperical 50 75 the name? Also, the amount of Silica shows 5 different gram amounts. Thanks for the formula!


Sorry it is confusing. I copied it from an excel web sheet that I have set up of all of my glazes. I use the empirical, use 50 for a multiplier that gives a 5000g batch, then use 75 for a multiplier for a 7500g batch. I do it this way since if I need more or less I just change the multiplier. In most cases it is just to mix a smaller container, and a larger one. So for each compound you should get the first number that when all are added=100(excluding the oxides). The second number is for the 5000 g. batch, and the third for a 7500 g batch.


3134 is the start of another component 3134 Frit. I guess I need to clean up my shorthand when sharing with others. Sorry.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users