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Rare Earth Colorants


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#1 Mushi

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 05:42 PM

My class has come into possession of some new rare-earth metal colorants: neodymium, erbium, and praseodymium (sp?)
I have found some testing information here: My link

Does anyone have any recipes that contain these new colorants?
We will be doing some of our own testing in the near future, and I will try to post any interesting results, if we find any. Posted Image
According to that link, the resulting colors seem fairly constant.

Edit: I forgot to mention that we fire redux at cone 10 :)

Edited by Mushi, 09 January 2011 - 05:45 PM.


#2 AmeriSwede

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 02:14 PM

Mushi...

I've not personally used these particular rare earth metals with ceramics, but have used them (in addition to uranium pentoxide) in batch mixing of borosilicate glass. The results are breathtaking.... beautiful pastel colors with the addition of a wonderful color fluorescence under ultraviolet light.

Can't help you with any recipe as such, but would certainly be interested in seeing photos/descriptions of any future testing/results that you achieve.
Perchance starting with a translucent or opaque white base and adding in 2% increments up to about 8% could yield some nice pastels. If I recall I was utilizing about 2%-4% for most of my work in the borosilicate glass. Sorry I can't be of more help but it has been about 25 years since I was doing that work/experimentation and my memory has since faded in the particulars.


------Rick



Above all, it is a matter of loving art, not understanding it. (Fernand Leger
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#3 JBaymore

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 09:19 PM

Neodymium and and praseodymium have been around for ceramic use for a long time. I've used both. Blues and yellows, respectively. There is some literature on their use out there... unfortunately can't remember where. CM had an article on many newer rare earth colorants in the past couple of years if I am remembering correctly.

Check MSDSs on them.

best,

..................john
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#4 Jessica Knapp

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 09:49 AM

The Ceramics Monthly article on rare earth elements used as colorants was written by David Pier and appeared in the September 2002 issue of the magazine, pp. 65-67.
I'd suggest doing test batches with transparent, translucent and opaque glaze bases that you like using already, doing a line blend to figure out the percentage needed to get the color you want.
Best,
Jessica

Neodymium and and praseodymium have been around for ceramic use for a long time. I've used both. Blues and yellows, respectively. There is some literature on their use out there... unfortunately can't remember where. CM had an article on many newer rare earth colorants in the past couple of years if I am remembering correctly.

Check MSDSs on them.

best,

..................john



#5 JBaymore

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 10:07 AM

Oh god, Jessica! That was 2002!!!!!

I'm really getting old.....that article seemed like yesterday.

best,

...................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#6 terraforma

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 08:07 PM

Ameriswede,

Where on earth did you get uranium pentoxide??? That really must have been a long time ago! Earlier this year, I searched for it extensively over a period of several weeks, and the only source I could find wouldn't sell it to me as an individual, and only sold in huge amounts like hundreds of pounds. I read in an old text about what a great yellow color it could give at high fire temps (cone 10...).

What cone(s) did you fire it at?
Mickey Fielding
Terraforma Studio
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#7 JBaymore

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 08:57 PM

Ameriswede,

Where on earth did you get uranium pentoxide???


It used to be available. I used black uranium oxide for a time in salt glazing (not soda). Early to mid 70s. Gorgeous yellows and oranges.

But it turned out the stuff we were geting was actually "hot"...even though the supplier said it was not. Had it tested. Stopped using it once we found out it was not FULLY depleted. Posted Image

best,

................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#8 AmeriSwede

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 04:28 AM

Ameriswede,

Where on earth did you get uranium pentoxide??? That really must have been a long time ago! Earlier this year, I searched for it extensively over a period of several weeks, and the only source I could find wouldn't sell it to me as an individual, and only sold in huge amounts like hundreds of pounds. I read in an old text about what a great yellow color it could give at high fire temps (cone 10...).

What cone(s) did you fire it at?





Sorry...terraforma.... I wasn't using the uranium pentoxide in ceramics or glazing. I (as a grad student -1986) was given two pounds of the oxide by my instructor while at NYSCC (Alfred). He had used quite a bit on a large lead crystal sculpture in previous years, and this was his leftover. I used it to batch up 200 pounds of borosilicate glass for some sculpture work I was doing at the time.


Posted Image

This is one of the pieces I was working on at the time.

It traveled to Japan and then found its way to the Glasmuseum at Ebeltoft, Denmark, where it resides today.

The bright yellow is the uranium pentoxide batched into a lead crystal glass and the darker green is the oxide batched into a borosilicate glass.
Though it does register a little activity on a geiger counter, according to Corning Museum of Glass, it is a very low amount (less than one X-ray/year or something like that).


------Rick



Above all, it is a matter of loving art, not understanding it. (Fernand Leger
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