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Mark C.

I'm Looking For Old Talc-Do You Have Any?

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I'm finally getting low on my talc stash from the 70-80's. I use it only in one of my satin matt glazes at cone 10.This talc is from long ago and has been replaced with pioneer talc which is grey in color. It was widely sold in the 70s and 80's

Its called desert talc or ct-30-

most bags where not marked and if they where they are in orange writing like this-

Cercron CP-96-30     Pfzer minerals 50#s The talc is bright white

Keeping with the rules here I cannot buy this so I would trade you whatever you need in ceramic materials say like cobalt carb. or whatever-I hope this fits the rules.

You can PM me if you have any from long ago.

Mark

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I got nervous when my local supplier ran out of Nytal and started carrying the gray talc instead. But I've found that at cone 6 the gray color completely disappears, and the satin matte surfaces are exactly the same.

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Nytal was still available until the supplies ran out a couple years ago. It does not contain asbestos, it was the unfortunate loser of a lawsuit. Someone claimed Nytal caused them mesothelioma, and won the lawsuit even though it was not proven. Manufacturer had to close the mine.

 

But anyways the gray talc might work just fine in your glazes. They will look different in the bucket, but fire the same.

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I have some bright white talc that someone told me is from a new York state mine that closed. Is that Nytal? I don't use it. I use a gray talc from Texas... I can tell you where I got it if it is what you are looking for Marc.

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mark, i have a middle-size rubbermaid tub almost full of talc from the early 90s or before.  probably was a 50 lb bag originally, does not look like it has ever had a scoop in it.  it is bright white.  no documentation of any kind.

 

i do not believe i have used it in years, if ever.  tomorrow i will check my recipe book to see if i even have a glaze recipe with talc in it.

 

naturally, i live an entire country away from you.  

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The thing is without recalculating the glaze entirely this satin matt only works well with the old talcs-the new talc called pioneer which is grey ( makes it shiny) I tested 3 talcs a few years back and found that desert talc (also called CT-30) which is white and has not been on the market for decades works best.

 

I use sierralite talc in all my other glazes except one where I use pioneer.

Pioneer is the most used and cheapest at least on the west coast.

let me know oldlady on what you find out-maybe a sample I could test would work-you must not use talc if you have had it for 25 years unused?

Mark

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I have been looking for white talc as well for my casting wax. Finding the ct-30 may be even tougher in a few more years. White talc is almost always overpriced considering you can purchase a bottle of scented talc at the dollar store. The only thing I have found is lab grade, soap suppliers, scented drugstore talc, or Tire talc used to install inner tubes.

 

Tire talc from the auto parts store was the cheapest unscented white talc I had found at 4.29 a lb. You can only guess whether it would work or not. Ebay and lab suppliers were over priced.

 

I had not had any luck in past searches, but Looking today I found a couple of places.

I have never heard of the companys, but "Soap goods" or "newdirectionsaromatics" on the web has talc and some other soap maker suppliers carry it.

 

You might have to adjust you recipe a bit, but they may work for you.

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Magnesium isn't that different but silica and alumina really are, between Natal and Imerys, plus theres a difference in the calcium. Do you use glaze calc software?

 

edit: I wonder if you emailed Ron Roy if he would have an analysis for your old talc?

 

From Ron Roy:

 

typical-analysis-materials.gif

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mark, i looked up the recipes and found that there are 5 in the book.  i have not tried 3 of them, the other two will probably work with ordinary talc since the colors are licorice and Penland Orange, a gorgeous gold.  i will mail some to you to try in your glazes and we will then talk about talc.

 

 

two hours later................... mark, the pound of talc will leave the local PO tomorrow.

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Is nytal that special....?? Not that I know where a full bag is or anything like that. What's so good about its in demand?

Not special . . . it appears Nytal was a consistent source for years and potters like consistency in the source of their materials, especially for glazes that define your look or product line. There is variation in raw materials; switching to a new mine for that material opens the door for changes in the product that are often not mentioned in the chemical analysis -- and your glaze just doesn't look the same. Sort of like wood ash; we all know wood ash is wood ash, unless it oak ash, pine ash, apple ash, walnut ash, etc.

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Imagines Mark meeting a talc dealer on a street corner, exchanging cash baggies of sweet, sweet vintage talc...

So,....with what do you cut talc?

 

Jed

 

Nothing man, my stuff is pure!

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Is nytal that special....?? Not that I know where a full bag is or anything like that. What's so good about its in demand?

Not special . . . it appears Nytal was a consistent source for years and potters like consistency in the source of their materials, especially for glazes that define your look or product line. There is variation in raw materials; switching to a new mine for that material opens the door for changes in the product that are often not mentioned in the chemical analysis -- and your glaze just doesn't look the same. Sort of like wood ash; we all know wood ash is wood ash, unless it oak ash, pine ash, apple ash, walnut ash, etc.

 

Yes thats it except in my case its the talc used before Nytal on the west coast.

For my 1st 25 years in clay the talc used was desert talc (ct 30) and when the talc supply changed most glazes made the switch just fine except for a satin matt and in this glaze as will all satin matts (they are buttery not shiny or dry) they are on a very fine line.

The new talcs change the look and feel of this glaze. I have since restricted my old talc to only using for this one glaze. Its lasted about 15 years now and is I'm seeing the end in the next year. I have found a few small amounts from older potters and traded them for it as most do not care as the newer talcs work fine in 99% of all glazes.

This glaze is one I'm known for and since I buy my materials in large amounts I can keep the look for decades.

Materials change a lot over time as they are mined from the earth-hence the change.

For example since I started with clay the feldspars are almost all different as the talcs and I'm not even on colorants.

Heck I still use kingman feldspar for 95% of all my galzes and I bet many have never heard of that one as its been out of production since the 80'S.

I drove to the mine and bought 3,000#s back when it went under.

Ok I'm a materials nut I admit it but I'm known for unusual glazes that look pretty much the same today as in the 70's.

Mark

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Just a heads up the above post is a Lawyer looking for this talc for lawsuit reasons-I spoke to him today as he called me.

I have since edited all my posts on this subject.

I'm feeling bad about this but I am giving you fair warning.

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RIGHT, I thought you were just opening up a new market before reading your post!! Or stirring the talc bowl.

Thought neil's post an interesting read. Put a label on something, sticks for life.

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Mark or Frank:

All I have is some old Nytol Talc with 15% asbestos. For you only $1lb, for lawyers $35,000 a lb. In all seriousness though: post the specs of the desert talc: strongly suspect I might have a good replacement. They use a white body talc in the paint and plastic industry.

Nerd

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I wonder if the "window of opportunity" on the asbestos liability fund that was set aside is getting close to running out and that is why the sudden interest by so many lawyers contacting you, Mark.

 

best,

 

............john

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I wonder if the "window of opportunity" on the asbestos liability fund that was set aside is getting close to running out and that is why the sudden interest by so many lawyers contacting you, Mark.

 

best,

 

............john

 

Don't worry about the lawyers running out of law suites against talc, 

http://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016-baby-powder-cancer-lawsuits/

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Diesel:

It is intentional :)

Nerd

1. sorry, I just fired the last of it yesterday.

2. sorry, my roses looked like they needed some powder.

3. sorry, I ran out of baby powder.

4. sorry, your rival offered me more money for it.

5. sorry, it was a typo- I meant Nytol.

6. sorry, I like wasting your time.

7. sorry, I only check my email twice a year.

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