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Soda Ash Wash And Electric Firing


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#1 Babs

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 11:10 PM

Thinking of applying a soda wash to the bottom third of pots. I know somewhere there was much discussion about this but cannot find the posts.

I like the effects I've seen but realise these were done in reduction firing.

I'm looking for a sheen effect.

a. what effects have been realised by this in oxidation?

b. Does any colouring come from the wash or will the bisque ware which has had iron applied and wiped off get enhanced by this process in oxidation?

c. What detrimental effects on elements?

I am using a fairly bland white body.



#2 bciskepottery

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 07:41 AM

You can vary the effect by the ratio of soda ash to water (hot). I think Chris C. used 1/4c soda ash to a cup of water; I've been going with less -- more like 1/8c soda ash to a cup of water. Basically, you get a sheen on the bare clay surface. Works for me as I do a lot of oxide washes on bare clay for exteriors and the slight sheen gives it a bit of finished look, vs. just fired clay.

Application will make a difference. You need to be fairly consistent in applying the soda ash wash. Too much/too heavy will make a spot shinier than others. I usually just dip a small sponge in the solution, wring it out, then wipe. I'd rather do a couple of light solution passes than one heavy one.

I apply oxides/stains/underglazes to greenware at leatherhard so it gets bisqued; that reduces bleeding, etc. from the soda ash was applied for the glaze firing. But, you may get some bleeding. Just have to practice and experiment with application process).

I only do a small number of pieces per load; that is not enough soda to really impact elements. Just run a bisque between glaze loads and your burn off any residual stuff from the elements.

#3 JBaymore

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 08:11 AM

If you start doing whole loads of this on the pieces... expect decreased element life.  But that is the "cost of doing business" to get the effect if you like it.  Will the result let you charge a bunch more for your work?  If so... just do it and replace elements more often.

 

A single piece here and there ... if kept from being right up against the area of the element... is not going to be detrimental.

 

Any soda bearing glazes that tyou are firing in the kiln are already outgassing soda into the atmosphere.  SO a whole load of soad feldspar glazed wares is doing as much as a single piece or two with this treatment.

 

best,

 

..................john


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#4 Pres

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 09:29 AM

Should I assume that ash type glazes would also cause faster element degradation, John?


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#5 JBaymore

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 01:33 PM

Should I assume that ash type glazes would also cause faster element degradation, John?

 

Yeah......  potassium and sodium both tend to be a bit fugitive.  But we are talking a small percentage change in life here.

 

best,

 

..................john


John Baymore
Adjunct Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

Former Guest Professor, Wuxi Institute of Arts and Science, Yixing, China

Former President and Past President; Potters Council
 

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http://www.nhia.edu/...ty/john-baymore


#6 Babs

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 08:20 PM

thank you for this info. Much appreciated.
Babs

#7 Diesel Clay

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 10:26 AM

I was speaking with a local potter who does some soda ash wash things in her cone 6 electric . She does small quantities on a semi regular basis, and she said she still got her 150 firings out of her elements.

#8 flowerdry

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 09:17 AM

Can anyone tell me if using the wash on cone 10 ware works ok?


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#9 bciskepottery

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 09:41 AM

Can anyone tell me if using the wash on cone 10 ware works ok?


Yep.

#10 Patat

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 09:48 AM

If you're worried about element life, you can put these pots inside a saggar. you can also then place small cups of solid soda ash around in the saggar for a fuming effect.



#11 oldlady

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 11:01 AM

any photos of what you are trying to achieve?  i just discovered a bag of soda ash on the shelf and cannot remember why i bought it.  maybe to make more magic water.


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#12 Babs

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 05:10 PM

I've used the soda wash, pots made have sold.

Gave a subtle sheen to the bare clay areas. Nice.



#13 flowerdry

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 11:12 AM

Thanks Bruce.  I'm going to try it on a brown cone 10 clay.  I'll let you all know how it comes out.  Interesting thought about the saggar.


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#14 Babs

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 05:20 PM

any photos of what you are trying to achieve?  i just discovered a bag of soda ash on the shelf and cannot remember why i bought it.  maybe to make more magic water.

Old Lady my original post was in 2014..

The soda wash, which I applied to bisque ware gave a satin subtle surface to t he unglazed clay area. I made a few yunomi for an exhibiton and wanted the unglazed area, about the bottom 1/3 to have this effect. It worked.



#15 Roberta12

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 05:32 PM

That is funny this thread popped up again.  I saw the soda ash wash picture in John Britt's book and thought it would be fun to try.  I got some soda ash from a tie dying friend. I had a heck of a time getting the soda ash to dissolve.  The chemist that lives at my house said I should have used warm water.  So I will try again.  I did not get the subtle sheen I was hoping for.....could be lack of dissolving properly. 

I am now prepped to try once again!~

Roberta



#16 bciskepottery

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 05:43 PM

That is funny this thread popped up again.  I saw the soda ash wash picture in John Britt's book and thought it would be fun to try.  I got some soda ash from a tie dying friend. I had a heck of a time getting the soda ash to dissolve.  The chemist that lives at my house said I should have used warm water.  So I will try again.  I did not get the subtle sheen I was hoping for.....could be lack of dissolving properly. 
I am now prepped to try once again!~
Roberta


You need hot water to dissolve the soda ash. Only make enough at a time for what you need.

#17 Magnolia Mud Researdh

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 12:46 PM

I keep a half gallon jug of soda ash solution on the shelf in the glaze studio to be used for spraying on raw clay bisque ware or over any cone 10 glaze to give it a shine or some orange to deep red coloration.  I make it up with tap water, powdered SA and shake.  It keeps for ever.  Don't leave it in the spray bottle as it will often plug the spray nozzle and take more time to clean than it does to empty the spray bottle back into the storage jug.  If you use hot water the solution will precipitate crystals when the solution cools and you will get crystals that plug the sprayer. 

 

I also keep TSP and 20-MuleTeam borax solutions available for spray washes.  The shelf life of the solutions are equal to the life of the container , not the contents.

 

LT



#18 Joseph F

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 09:13 PM

I know this is an old thread I am bumping, but I am wondering if anyone has tried sponging or using soda wash on top/underneath a glazed surface and what happens to the glaze itself? 

 

For example taking a sprayer and spraying soda wash on the bisque surface then spraying glazes like normal, would this have any effect on the glaze? I assume it would, but I haven't tried it yet. I am planning on trying it very soon though. If anyone has done this, any tips/tricks?

 

I am not too concerned with element life. If I can get the look I am after I will just replace the elements more.



#19 Diesel Clay

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 09:29 PM

It'll flux things out some, and might cause some localized crazing where it's heaviest. Try it and see.

#20 neilestrick

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 10:20 PM

The salts will come to the surface to some degree as the piece dries, and it will flux out the glaze. I suppose there's also the danger of the clay body being fluxed out, which would be a bad thing.


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