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deHues

Making Cone Packs

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I thought I knew how to do this but now I'm confused about how to position the cones in the clay pack. In the image there is a cone box with an image of a cone pack. It has each cone turned so that it has a sharp edge toward the bend direction. That is how I did the front pack.

 

On the second pack to the left, I did it how I always thought it was to be with the flat face of the cone facing the drop or bend direction. Which way is correct?

 

Second question: I read on this forum that someone said the cone must be angled 8 degrees. I am using a protractor to measure that tip and I am assuming that is referring to the part of the cone facing the bend direction. Not the back of the cone which has more of an angle. Sorry if I am over thinking this.

 

Oh also, how far apart should they be? Thank you.

post-8088-0-69749900-1409956402_thumb.jpg

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The lowest cone value should be first in the direction they lean. I always put the flat side toward the direction they will sag. I think this is the way recommended...pretty much like the picture. I never have used a protractor to measure angle. I just make sure that they are slightly bent towards the direction I want them to sag. if you wish to be more precise, that's fine. I like to fire my pieces to the point the middle cone ( the range you are looking for) touches down. Of course there should be three cones, one above and one below the cone you are shooting for. I leave just enough room for my cones not to hit each other when they sag. The lower ones should be pretty much down before the next one sags, so they can be within a cones width of each other. You want to be able to see them all through the peep hole.

 

Remember, firing a kiln load of ware is not something that can be absolutely reproduced from one firing to the other. As an old time potter I feel more comfortable seeing the middle cone down and the next higher just bent at the end of a run, but as has been mentioned many times, total heat work is what determines the glaze results on any run.

I have half a cone difference between the top and bottom of the kiln and it makes little difference for the glazes I use.

 

WRITE EVERYTHING DOWN! When a kiln load turns out right, try and reproduce conditions as much as you can and don't get to caught up in the some rigid set of "must do".

LeeU likes this

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They look good to me. I put the flat side on the bend direction, too. When firing a high fire for reduction i use a small 09 and

04 near a thumb imprint to catch their melt. these are for body reduction.

Lots of pinholes is good too. Keeps them from blowing up.

 

Marcia

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I have a different take on cone packs. As I fire an L&L electric, manually, the small peep hole made me adjust my cone back so that the cones are place at angles perpendicular to the clay. This way, when cone 5 drops I see it going left in my peep, then 6 goes right, and if 7 went down, it would go left as 5 did. Yes, I make certain my cone packs are consistently the same with right being cone 6-little pun, but helps me remember. My pack is only about 2.5 inches long so it really does not take up a lot of space. You just have to be careful how close you get to left and right.

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As seen on side of cone box -make sure that each cone falls clear of the cone next to it. Your pack on right looks great.

The pack on left apperas that each cone may fall on cone in front.If they fall onto each other you cannot tell the end point exactly (the max bend of cone)

I never measure the angle but you will quickly get a feel for this angle.

I make up a bunch of packs and when needed they are always dry.

Your one on right looks fine.

Mark

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I don't make cone packs, I wrap single cones individually, I roll a sausage of clay, a bit like a very elongated egg, maybe 80mm long and 10mm at the thickest point tapering down to nothing.

 

The actual cone ends are not square to the sides, place the end on a flat surface, (and see how it leans over)  wrap the sausage around the cone, put the middle of the sausage where the cone makes an acute angle with the flat surface, bring the thin ends together around the cone and your cone is ready (when dry) and leaning at the right angle.

 

Sounds complicated but it takes seconds once you've got it.

 

cone_down_zps137155d7.jpgcone_bottom_zps2a638c4a.jpg

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