Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

What Do You Cover Your Work Tables With?


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 SmartsyArtsy

SmartsyArtsy

    Chris Seminara

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 179 posts
  • LocationPNW

Posted 02 September 2014 - 03:43 PM

I am moving away from canvas an choosing textured plastic or vinyl

#2 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,065 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 02 September 2014 - 04:01 PM

Work tables I do not cover. Just keep a good coat of polyurethane on the surfaces.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#3 Biglou13

Biglou13

    Advanced beginner pottery, Advanced in other art

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,011 posts
  • LocationNorth Florida

Posted 02 September 2014 - 04:02 PM

One place I used to go to had Formica slabs on top of stainless kitchen work tables. I'm thinking plywood pices, higher grade, an maybe an Danish oil finish. Functional work surface, wipes clean.
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
-Albert Einstein

#4 SmartsyArtsy

SmartsyArtsy

    Chris Seminara

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 179 posts
  • LocationPNW

Posted 02 September 2014 - 04:02 PM

Just found this very good discussion

http://community.cer...ering#entry2407


I am off to look at several options at HD and a local industrial fabric shop. Lots of good possibilities in the above linked to thread. I have several doors as table tops and am not sure how I feel about working on wood because of the dark color. I have also worked on Formica and liked that. Just need to keep the dust down as well as I can

#5 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,915 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 02 September 2014 - 04:03 PM

All work surfaces are formica or steel or hard plastic

Less dust.

Mark


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#6 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,706 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 02 September 2014 - 05:08 PM

The work tables in my studio are 3/4" MDF coated with linseed oil. They are absorbent, so great for rolling coils and handbuilding, and the oil keeps the MDF from delaminating. I re-coat every 3 or 4 years. Which reminds me, I need to do that.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#7 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,975 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 02 September 2014 - 05:15 PM

I have polyurethane on the cart by my wheel. Formice is on the work tables and I use a vinyl table cloth when I am working with chemicals for foil sag gars.

Marcia

#8 SmartsyArtsy

SmartsyArtsy

    Chris Seminara

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 179 posts
  • LocationPNW

Posted 02 September 2014 - 07:15 PM

Well, I must say that HD and the fabric store had the most unhelpful and unimaginable employees!!! UGH!

In HD I looked at Formica (possible at some other time), coated MDF, which I think you use with the linseed oil, Neil ($9 a sheet; color is the issue with me), sheet vinyl (a very possible for me @ $12.50 for a 3x7 sheet). The coated MDF is only available in their larger store so I will be up that way in a week.

I was disappointed at the vinyl options in the fabric store. It appeared all the marine vinyl was coated with poly, and the rest seemed too thin. I am not, though, satisfied that I saw every possible option. Those fabrics were costly anyhow.

#9 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,206 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 02 September 2014 - 09:03 PM

Pres ... Can you describe the process for coating with polyurethane? I would love to switch to that.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#10 JBaymore

JBaymore

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 2,977 posts
  • LocationWilton, NH USA

Posted 02 September 2014 - 09:12 PM

Main 4 x 8 work tables are 3/4 CDX plywood covered with 1/8 masonite (not the tempered stuff). I replace the masonite about once a year. Great working surface. Tables are 35 years old now.

 

Glaze lab counter is formica.

 

Deck surrounding wheels natural wood (pine) polished by years of cleaning.

 

At the college we use MDF like Neil.

 

best,

 

................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#11 Denice

Denice

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 679 posts
  • LocationWichita, Kansas

Posted 03 September 2014 - 08:22 AM

John the masonite is a great idea,  I have been wanting to replace my canvas on my work tables and I have a bunch of masonite in my basement.  What type of screw did you use to hold it in place?   Denice



#12 JBaymore

JBaymore

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 2,977 posts
  • LocationWilton, NH USA

Posted 03 September 2014 - 10:35 PM

What type of screw did you use to hold it in place? Denice

 

Sheetrock NAILS. (Hard to find these days.... sheetrock is now mostly put up with screws.) I used short ones... easy to remove when changing it. You don't need all that many. They have large flat heads, don;t impact the surface much at all.

 

best,

 

......................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#13 earthfan

earthfan

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts

Posted 04 September 2014 - 06:54 AM

In Australia we have a sheet building material that is made of cellulose held together by cement. We call it fibre cement and it replaces asbestos cement that is no longer made. It makes terrific bats and it's the perfect surface for work tables. It is cheap, porous, smooth and doesn't' warp, chip or rot. I have an old pine table that I have covered with builders' plastic with a whole sheet of fibre cement on top. To protect the plastic sheeting I have put some offcuts of my kitchen floor covering between the two layers. You can wet down the fibre cement when you want to get into hand building. When it is dry, it really sucks the water out of sloppy clay, so I use it to stiffen clay that is softer than I like.



#14 TJR

TJR

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,233 posts
  • LocationCanada

Posted 04 September 2014 - 07:50 AM

I have one canvas covered table that I use for hand building-rolling coils and slabs. The rest of my tables are 4x8 plywood painted grey. I do not use the surface other than to place ware boards when decorating.

TJR.



#15 joshur

joshur

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts

Posted 04 September 2014 - 10:55 AM

Pres ... Can you describe the process for coating with polyurethane? I would love to switch to that.

Chris,

Did you get your question answered about how to apply polyurethane to a table?



#16 perkolator

perkolator

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 313 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 10 September 2014 - 01:37 PM

to put polyurethane on a table:  sand table, wipe with tack cloth, apply urethane with brush or foam roller.  done.

 

we are a sculpture studio, so on all our studio tables we prefer to keep it either raw plywood (AC grade) so that it can still absorb some water from the clay when hand-building; or the entire table gets a coating of urethane.  lately i've been using Helmsman Spar Urethane water-based, because they stopped carrying the oil-based version at most stores (the water-based actually looks better IMO since it's a clear vs amber, and cleanup is MUCH improved with water/soap vs mineral spirits).  urethane coating is nice and helps preserve the wood, but the downside is it seals up the grains and no longer absorbs water - as a result the clay ends up sticking to it.  almost always, students end up using a 24"x36"x3/4" raw plywood board to work on regardless of table surface, so it isn't an issue.  we also have a concrete floor to use for absorbing moisture.  if we were a pottery studio where more water is around the studio, i'd be putting out more sealed up tables since it's the clay water getting up under plywood layers that degrades it.

 

glaze room has nice aluminum topped work table and the countertops are some sort of masonite/plywood hybrid that i keep a nice urethane coating on for easy wipe-down.



#17 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,915 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 10 September 2014 - 03:09 PM

After much thought on this I realized I cover my tables with work-they rarely are empty.

Mark


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#18 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,053 posts

Posted 10 September 2014 - 05:20 PM

After much thought on this I realized I cover my tables with work-they rarely are empty.

Mark

:D  :D



#19 Min

Min

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 525 posts
  • LocationCanada

Posted 10 September 2014 - 05:35 PM

After much thought on this I realized I cover my tables with work-they rarely are empty.

Mark

 

Very true! And the work area gets smaller and smaller as I pile up slip pails, paint brushes, tools and all sorts of crap.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users