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Do You Mix Or Buy Ready Made? Poll

Mix or Buy Ready Made?  

50 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you mix your own clay?

    • Yes
      1
    • No I buy it already processed
      38
    • Mix some and buy some
      11
  2. 2. Do you mix your own glazes?

    • Yes
      25
    • No I buy ready made glazes
      12
    • Mix some of my own and buy some ready made
      13


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Clay: currently using premixed H570, but I have done both. I really liked to mix my own in college, when I had access to a Soldner mixer. It's a bit harder with a shovel. My supplier sells dry bags of premixed clay, for those who don't want to pay for freight on water. My favourite is a mix of H570 with 5-10% Redart for soda fire.

 

Glazes: Make my own. I dig chemistry!

 

(Bad pun. Down! Sit!)

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Perhaps we now have to differentiate with the clay makers who dig clay and ones who mix dry clay prepared by companies :) ..

 

CLAY:  Mix some, buy some, alter much of the bought stuff.

 

GLAZES: Mix some and buy some. (I buy overglaze enamels and resinous lusters....make the rest.)

 

best,

 

.......................john

 

Yes market research usually yields possible choices not known to the researcher.  That's why you would do something like this preliminary survey, with encouragement for expansion of the options, or a focus group to yield a more valid question form.

 

For sure, it would be insightful to know how many people actually dig clay.   Or alter a premade.  And I'm noticing a pattern in the glaze mixers .... they buy certain types, like overglaze, underglaze, and resinous lusters, etc.

 

Now I will be so bold as to ask "why" you mix your own glaze or clay?    I'm asking these questions for my own skill development knowledge ... I don't sell any of these products.

 

Thank you for your responses.

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Perhaps we now have to differentiate with the clay makers who dig clay and ones who mix dry clay prepared by companies :) ..

 

CLAY:  Mix some, buy some, alter much of the bought stuff.

 

GLAZES: Mix some and buy some. (I buy overglaze enamels and resinous lusters....make the rest.)

 

best,

 

.......................john

 

Yes market research usually yields possible choices not known to the researcher.  That's why you would do something like this preliminary survey, with encouragement for expansion of the options, or a focus group to yield a more valid question form.

 

For sure, it would be insightful to know how many people actually dig clay.   Or alter a premade.  And I'm noticing a pattern in the glaze mixers .... they buy certain types, like overglaze, underglaze, and resinous lusters, etc.

 

Now I will be so bold as to ask "why" you mix your own glaze or clay?    I'm asking these questions for my own skill development knowledge ... I don't sell any of these products.

 

Thank you for your responses.

 

We're control freaks!

Or of an age when premades were not available, but mostly because of hte curiousity and immense satisfaction which comes with the process. And you never know it all. ongoing learning, seeking.

And I suppose the dollars though I've never compared the two methods.

Chilly likes this

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We're control freaks!

Or of an age when premades were not available, but mostly because of hte curiousity and immense satisfaction which comes with the process. And you never know it all. ongoing learning, seeking.

And I suppose the dollars though I've never compared the two methods.

 

Or we buy the commercial glaze and it doesn't work with our clay/firing schedule/........ and want to improve it.  Also the cost does come into it,

 

Or, in my case, I was gifted a stack of buckets of raw materials and it seems daft not to use them.......

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I fit into the age group when premix clays were not available and was thrilled when they became available. I still find myself making clay because I'm not happy with the premixed clay.  I am also called a control freak or perfectionist now and then, I am glad to hear that's  just one of the personality traits of a potter.  TEST TEST TEST  Denice

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i guess i am just a leech.  i buy readymade clay, use other people's glaze recipes and buy special stuff like red glaze for christmas items.

 

i do try other colors in those glaze recipes, there are now 352 glaze tests hanging in the studio.  oops, 7 or 8 of them are still cooling in the kiln right now and won't be hung for a few days while i mull over the results.

 

who mentioned a test with crossing lines of glaze recently?  not having the benefit of a college education, i am not familiar with what is supposed to be a basic tool for potters.

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A guy, Greg Daly has a great book on this, took the fear out of it for me, I haven't a college ed. in Ceramics either, just an enqiring mind, or obsessive, as I have been told at least once :D

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I prefer to mix because the premade stuff doesn't do what I want it to.

 

I doctor a premade clay that has *most *of the characteristics I want, and add things like grog to improve its ability to "stand up" while throwing, and Red Art for flashing/colour. I'm currently away from a soda kiln, so it isn't as necessary, and I'm using premix.

 

I mix my own glazes because it's what I was taught, so it's what I know to do. Even if I used commercial stuff, I think it would be useful to know how the chemistry worked. It helps with troubleshooting. And if I have to correct a glaze for crazing, I might has well mix it myself.

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who mentioned a test with crossing lines of glaze recently?  not having the benefit of a college education, i am not familiar with what is supposed to be a basic tool for potters.

 

 

If you're taking two glazes , A and B, together on a test tile, you lay down 4 stripes so you get a #. It tells you:

-how the two glazes look with a single layer of each

- a double layer of each

-what glaze A looks like over glaze B

-what glaze B looks like over glaze A (not always the same)

-if either glaze or combination thereof flashes on the bare clay

-if the combinations form a eutectic (excessively runny glaze)

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One exercise Grag Daly offers is to take 2 of your known glazes and line blend them, then find a glaze from that exercise you would like to go on with and run similar tests with a variety of colourants. have done this and it is really interesting process. Knowong the chem is obviously the way to go. Am acquiring this thro reading and practising.

Another of Greg's exercises is to take a known glaze and rotate the quantities of the chemicals methodically, say start with a glaze

Pot Feld 40

Whiting  20

epk        35

Zinc ox 10

I made these up for this post!

He then would try

Pot Feld    20

Whiting     35

Epk           10

Zinc Oxide 40

And so on

This way he says leads to truly different glazes which you would never have formulated.... Warning may need kiln wash and biscuits.

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Mix my own clays for the sculptural work to get colour or effect 'just right' but buy commercial porcelaineous stoneware clay for the everyday domestic work as it will be covered by underglaze/glaze layer anyway.... saves me time

 

Mostly use standard commercial pre mixed clear on the domestic ware which I modify for colour or effect sometimes, don't use any glaze on sculptural pieces as the clay texture and colour are part of the piece's 'voice'.

 

Irene

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thank you diesel clay, maybe it is just very late after a long day but i do not see the result you suggest. :blink:   vertical line glaze A, vertical line glaze B, horizontal line glaze A, horizontal line glaze B.  got it right so far?   OH!! got it.

 

not quite. :wacko:   don't see how each crosses the other both ways.  

 

will think about this tomorrow, signed,  Scarlett

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