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marcello

Shinsha Glaze

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Hello

I am attaching here a picture of a japanese tea cup. I was told by the potter this is Shinsha glaze, made with copper and gold"

I guess this colour is obtained by reduction. Do you agree?

Can anybody tell me a possible glaze recipe to imitate this work?

Many thanks,

Marcello

post-64537-0-21988200-1409501561_thumb.jpg

post-64537-0-21988200-1409501561_thumb.jpg

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I found a link to a blog that has a recipe for Shinsha glaze.  It is a reduction glaze, does include copper carbonate in the ingredients, but no gold (that seemed unlikely to be BTW.)  It reads like a tough glaze to fire properly.

 

The picture looked like a copper red with some thinning at the rim making the white, and possibly another copper containing glaze producing the green down low and inside.  I am no glaze expert, but these are my observations. 

 

Some Google research shows a number of pots for sale with Shinsha glaze.  Most have the red/cinnabar color and blushes of green, but much less pronounced than your example, but those may be on a darker clay body.

 

John 

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A copper red in reduction will give you that look; the clear on the rim happens because the glaze thins on edges. You also get green/clear from a copper red if it oxidizes or is too thin. For Cone 10, I use Pete Pinnell's copper red.

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Thank you

 

>I found a link to a blog that has a recipe for Shinsha glaze.  It is a reduction glaze, does include copper carbonate in the ingredients, but no gold (that seemed unlikely to be BTW.)  It reads like a tough glaze to fire properly.

 

is it possible to post the link?

 

> For Cone 10, I use Pete Pinnell's copper red. 

 

Where can I find the recipe?

 

Many thanks!!!!

Marcello

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Thank you very much

I have another question: since I cannot find anybody to teach me, can you suggest me a good book about reduction kilns, and how to properly manage the reduction process?

Many thanks

Marcello

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