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Marcia Selsor

How Would You Describe Your Current Studio Location. Suburban Garage, Urban Basement, Community Setup, Rural Spread?

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Urban basement. It used to be a cramped and unappealing space, but last year I had it renovated. Now it is everything I ever wanted, and allows me to run a business at full-speed. I have two 7 cubic foot electric kilns, and glaze fire to cone 6.

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Basement workshop with kilns (2) in covered and enclosed deck in the back. 1 kiln is a 10 cubic' front loader, the other a small top loader that i use mostly for tests, I fire to ^6/7 Only problem with having a home workshop is my "mess" seems to take over the house. Have taken over 3 bedrooms now, 2 for storage and 1 for packing.

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Urban one car garage, not attached to the house. Electric heat, brick uninsulated walls. Garage is built over underground river. Previous owners put drain in floor-dumps to river. I don't use it. Space is cramped, and I have two kilns, one CXC Brent wheel, a wedging table, long rolling cabinet form Sams club with a butcher block top, and 3 shelving units. One of the shelving units is industrial and keeps powders up off of the floor in bags or bins. I also have a workbench for house tools in the area, so there is just too much.

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I guess it is ok to add mine...urban car port that I enclosed with walls and a wall AC unit. I don't need heat down here.

I have a cinder block kiln shed for raku kilns and small, medium and large electric kilns. The small kiln is my 20+ year old Crucible kiln. My yard is private enough I don't bother the neighbors.We don't have a basement.

Marcia

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Converted 200 +/- year old barn attached to a center chimney colonial in a formerly rural... now less rural....... section of southern NH. 1000 sq. ft main studio, 1000 sq. ft. materials storage, and 1000 sq. ft. not used yet. Two shed-roofed outbuildings that house kilns. One gas kiln in one, and one noborigama in the other. One small electric kiln, one propane gas kiln, one wood kiln.

 

All sit along the banks of a set of rapids on the Souhegan River. Great sounds and views.

 

best,

 

....................john

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Rural 20'x25' section of two storey garage built especially for me! I moved from damp, low ceilinged cellar of 1850's house to this lovely studio 23 years ago. The blank space has been altered as I've grown; my carpentry tools are in the other part of the garage.

Lots of wall shelves, two rolling selves (former bakery shelves), 4'x8 work table, slab roller, extruder, wheel, electric kiln, a bunch of self made tools, wood stove for heat.

I'm a lucky bird!

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suburban rural since the closest town is 6 miles away.  was a ranch house with 2 car attatched garage which the former owner added on to with another single car garage with a concrete floor and later another one car garage with a dirt floor.  it also has the septic tank under the dirt.  that last garage has a garage door and it houses my kilns.  only one is in use, the L&L.  that space also has an 8 foot high by 8 foot wide set of steel shelves holding all the normal household junk and a large group of cast iron radiators left over from installation when i moved here.   the other garage has the woodworking and other tools.  it also stores stuff to glaze and fire, the pugmill, the extruder and several bakery racks with drywall shelving.  i removed the garage door and replaced it with 3 windows and a people door with a window.

 

the main studio is the original 2 car garage.  i removed the double door and put a bay window out an additional 8 feet. a set of french doors fills the rest of the wall.  that  gives me a 16x8 area with  view of the potomac river and my wheel and work table are there.  the slab roller is along the wall  of the new bathroom i built so i could sell the house more easily.  parallel to the slab roller is a 10 foot long stainless steel table from a Pizza Hut that was remodeling and throwing it away (!!!)  at  the end of the table is a shorter bakers rack with drywall shelving.   a third parallel storage area for glaze materials fills out that garage.

 

getting too comfortable and lazy here, i know how fortunate i am.  the space is heated by radiators and cooled by ac.  may never sell after all.  

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Southern New Hampshire rural to suburban setting. 12x36 foot space...built 7-years ago...walk out addition to a 50 year old Colonial (suburban part) on a 38 acre private pond (rural part). Plenty of sunlight. Enough room with imaginative storage solutions. One old small Duncan elec, one larger newer L&L electric. 17 cubic foot, Olympia gas kiln. Electrics are used mostly for bisque. Fire mostly cone 10 shino glazed teapots, teabowls and urns in the gas kiln. The studio fits my needs and work flow perfectly.

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Suburban double garage , purpose built for studio with hydronic[coils] heat in the floor. The coils contain anti-freeze, so they heat all winter.

Used electric kiln in the corner for bisquing. Kiln has under floor venting to the outside. I fire a gas kiln with another potter, at his studio. I don't have room for a gas kiln where I am.

Tom.

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Our house is in the city limits, we have a view of a creek, fields, and wild life  across the street. My studio was built with the house, it's actually a section of the garage that is enclosed by walls and door.  I have a kiln room with 3 electric kilns, it has ceiling power vent, a window and a Skutt downdraft system.  Put in a nice corner counter sink area with a settling system for the clay, lot of shelves and three work tables.  I have a Bailey 30"x72" slab roller and a old kick wheel and extruder, when it comes to luxury features is has heat and AC and a TV in the corner.  It's only 24'x13' but it's large enough for me, I spray my glazes in the garage.  Last house I was in the basement without  windows for 14 years,  I put 4 large windows in this one.  Denice

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Suburban basement/garage layout.  My basement formerly had one third dedicated to a woodshop, and now the rest of the basement has been overtaken by pottery needs.  I have just about added all the shelving it will hold, and every time I added one it filled up immediately with glaze making materials from studio shut down acquisitions. One corner holds plastic tubs with finished ware ready to go to shows, alongs with packing materials.  What room is left has been filled with a pottery wheel, a large slab roller, a wedging station, and I screwed my extruder to a board so i can clamp it to my woodworking bench.  My garage holds one small and one large oval electric kiln, and I store a fiber raku kiln there as well.  The kilns have their own subpanel power, and are fired using a Skutt KM-1 wall mounted controller and share an Orton Vent.  The garage also houses my air compressor which gets moved out into the drive when spraying glazes.

 

I am moving to another house next year that has an unfinished, but studded, basement, that my bride says is all mine to configure.  Mea Rhee's re-do will be solidly in my mind as I proceed with building it out.

 

John

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After spending three years working from a basement, I decided to have my studio upstairs when we built our new home. I took over a bedroom ... deleted the closet, added two more windows, water, industrial carpet and cabinets. I have hauled tons of clay up and down those stairs for many years ... it is totally worth it to work up in the trees.

 

Another bedroom is my office and still another is the packing/storage room.

 

The garage holds three electric kilns ... two large Skutts and a small test kiln ... that is also where I throw, make molds, spray glazes ... any dirty work can be easily cleaned up with a garden hose hooked up in my work area. The shelves near the kiln are the same size as the ones in my studio and since they are not attached I can easily move work back and forth on them.

 

http://www.ccpottery.com/villas/studio.html

 

My husband claims I am slowly taking over the whole house, but loves it at tax time!

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Basement used to be bedroom, wood shelving around the walls, 2 wheels beside the shelves, wedging table & pug mill all with just enough room. Sink is out side the studio across from the furnace, on the long wall is washer/dryer then glazing shelves with glazes in pails along the floor & under the shelves & on rollers just room enough to squeeze by another person while glazing. The kiln is in the garage. Fire to cone 6/7.

I have a window.

Joy

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We use about 1100' spread out on our property.

 

Had been just the double garage 500', dubbed the garagio (I know real original). Just added and bringing online a 300' free standing studio with a cedar deck along the front for spring/summer drying. The business has also absorbed two bedrooms for another 300' for office and staging/photo/packing and shipping.

 

I will be adding a brick patio 'kiln' area housing a pit, raku and gas kiln and will be adding and additional 200' building, finished out and used initially for stock and inventory.

 

It does take over the place but wow it saves a fortune when compared to renting 1200-1500 feet of studio space and paying monthly rent, triple net and utilities.  

 

We live in a neighborhood of 1 acre homes sites so we are not much bother to our neighbors. The new kiln area will be about a football field from anyone's house (except ours :-) so I am hoping it will continue to not bother anyone. Most of our firing will remain cone 6 electric so this should work.

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the kiln is in the top photo in the rear on the right. Not sure, but I think that is a wheel with a splash pan next to it in the center.I see pots drying on the left in the lower photo. It is raining on the windows.looks like quite a few projects happening as well.

Marcia

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Where/how do you dry your pots? How far away is your kiln?

 

There's quite a lot of shelf space dotted around but I'd need to take a pic from the side to show them.

 

the kiln is in the top photo in the rear on the right. Not sure, but I think that is a wheel with a splash pan next to it in the center.I see pots drying on the left in the lower photo. It is raining on the windows.looks like quite a few projects happening as well.
Marcia

 

Yes, my kiln is there, close to the wheel , and there's another one, (my old one) under the table with the pots on.

 

I've usually got something going on.

 

I'll be working on making some improved versions (plenty of room for it) of these next.

 

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Suburban  garden, 8' x 10' cedar greenhouse, shared 50/50 with over-wintered-plants/potting/garden stuff. And sometimes a bike. Although it's getting more like 60/40 now as pottery is taking over..  No wheel, but kiln lives in there too, some glazes live in under-bed boxes, and (inherited) raw materials are in buckets round the back of the other greenhouse (which is purely plants, and heated to frost-free in the winter).  No heat apart from the sun, and no power sockets, so any mixing/dremelling needs an extension lead running.

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wow, john!  don't forget windows.  

 

tom, heated floors are the very best!

 

14 years without windows sounds like a sentence!  what did you do! :)

Oh yes, so many years in the basement without windows, I didn't even think of that. Working without windows keeps you focused on the work at hand.  My new space has windows looking out into a forest, but the windows are under a deck.  I am hoping having the furnace in the basement will keep the place above freezing, if not in the 50-60s in the winter like my basement now.

 

John

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