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Protecting Kiln Shelves From Runny Glazes


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#1 Isculpt

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 11:18 PM

I read here on the forum that when different glazes are layered, they can become runnier than they would be if used alone.  I recently attended a little Amaco workshop where Potters Choice glazes were applied one atop another.  I have no experience with these glazes, other than on flat test tiles where only a few spilled over.  I've just gotten new shelves for my kiln and I wonder if simply applying the kiln wash that came with the kiln will protect the shelves, or should I make a flat clay "plate" to put my work on so that drips don't affect the shelves?

 

Jayne



#2 schmism

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 11:52 PM

kill wash will give you some protection, but small plates are a sure fire way to protect the shelves.



#3 Babs

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 12:40 AM

 I put 3 layers of kiln wash on shelves, don't know if this is an overkill.

If ware is small and going to low temp, I'd stilt it and put a tile under because your ware may adhere to the tile and then it may be the case that in the seperating of these two, your work will be chipped.

larger stuff, I put a layer of fine grog which can be, if necessary, sanded/ground off if there is a run.

The foot may be trimmed in a way that catches the drips, there may be references to this in the posts on how people trim stuff.



#4 Biglou13

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 09:11 AM

i wedge in a bunch of grog to whatever cone 10 clay i have abnd make tiles

i run a fork through on one side.  i have a few that are kiln washed for cones or other problem chlidren.

i keep a few larger tiles 6 inch but most are 4 inch or scrap pieces


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#5 Isculpt

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 09:44 AM

Okay, thanks, I'll try 3 coats of kiln wash and make some plates.  My concern about the plates is getting them flat enough that they don't cause problems for the sculptures that will be sitting on top of them.  But stilts on the plates will probably solve that issue? As for Big Lou's forked backside (well, that sounds weird) -- I've read that grooves in the backside make the tile less likely to warp, but I'm darned if I can understand how making the two sides unequal results in equal drying and thus less warping!

 

Jayne



#6 Mark C.

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 11:58 AM

Scoring the backs of tile allow more drying surface area-If you want flat tiles dry them between weighted sheet rock.

Mark


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#7 TJR

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 12:48 PM

If I know a glaze may run,like an ash glaze, or if it is a test I am not sure of, I put the pot on a piece of broken kiln shelf. Sometimes it's not enough, so make sure you have kiln wash on the big shelf.

TJR.



#8 Biglou13

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 01:32 PM

+ 1 on weighted dry wall

i dont score all tiles


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#9 Pugaboo

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 10:36 PM

I make discs to sit just about everything on and use stilts a lot. I also use kiln wash. If it is a new glaze or glaze combination don't make a flat disc make the disc bigger than your base and curve the edges up like a shallow dish. Set this on the shelf then add a smaller flat disc inside to sit the test piece on. It will look kind of like a moat. The discs I use I make sure they are the same size or slightly smaller than the foot of my piece which helps in the accidental sticking together of the disc and piece if the glaze runs a lot.

I've seen the disaster that shelves can become at the community studio here if steps aren't taken to protect the shelves. I go above and beyond to try and protect mine as much as I can.

Terry
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#10 Isculpt

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 01:47 AM

Thanks, Mark, for explaining the logic of grooving the backs of the tiles.  With high humidity, anything that encourages drying is helpful. 

 

Mark & Big Lou, do you score the tiles even if you're going to place them between sheet rock? Do you weight it with 25 lb bags of clay or will something less heavy do?  I have gallon bags of sand that I use for weighting some things....

 

Pugaboo, that's a good idea about the curved dish.....



#11 Biglou13

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 05:33 AM

I have differennt sizes of Sheetrock. I place a 25#weight on it I usually us the 2x2 sheets sometimes 2levels deep, three pieces of sheet rock. Weight is a bumper plate so it's approximately 20 inch in diameter. Sometimes at studio I place a square board on top of stack and place partially filled glaze bucket on top. I also wrap sack with garbage bag to slow the edges from drying faster. I may just buy 4 10 # plates for the community studio.

I think it's about even distribution of weight. Hence the board on top. Sheet rock Tiles sheet rock (wrapped in platic) wood board/ weight. bag of clay is fine
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#12 bciskepottery

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 07:07 AM

For my slab work, I place a sheet of newsprint on the sheetrock, then add slabs/tiles.  On top, another piece of newsprint, then a second piece of sheetrock.  The newsprint prevents the slabs/tiles from sticking to the underside of the top sheetrock.  No weight on top; the weight of the sheetrock is enough, plus it allows the clay to have its normal shrinkage as it sets.  If setting up slabs/tiles overnight, I'll wrap in plastic to slow drying. 

 

In addition to sheetrock, I also use 1/2 inch plywood -- 24"x24".  That is thick enough to stay flat, which is the key. 






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