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hershey8

Are Crimp Butt Connectors Ok To Use In Wiring Kiln

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Paragon kilns, at least the one I have, use rather pricey bronze wire connectors to secure elements to hook up wire and switches.  Skutt uses a crimp-on barrel butt connectors . They appear to be cheaper. Are they're other alternatives? I'm wiring up an old controller to an old snf-24 Paragon, bypassing all original switches and  relays. I hate to spend $70 on bronze connectors.    thanks    john

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Paragon kilns, at least the one I have, use rather pricey bronze wire connectors to secure elements to hook up wire and switches.  Skutt uses a crimp-on barrel butt connectors . They appear to be cheaper. Are they're other alternatives? I'm wiring up an old controller to an old snf-24 Paragon, bypassing all original switches and  relays. I hate to spend $70 on bronze connectors.    thanks    john

OOOPS.....sorry meant to post on "In the studio."    frit happens

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I hate crimp connectors. If you make a mistake in the wiring, you're in trouble. Screw connectors are the best because you can reuse them, your feeder wires don't get shortened every time you change elements, you can unhook them to test individual elements, and they really do last a very long time if you scrub them down now and then with a wire brush. If you use crimp connectors, ideally you should use high temp connectors, not just any old connector from the hardware store. Another cheap option is to do like some old kilns and make a loop at the end of the element pigtail and use a nut and bolt to secure the feeder wire to the pigtail. Put a ring connector on the end of the feeder wire, or just wrap it around the bolt. Use washers on either side of the element and wire, and a lock washer.

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I hate crimp connectors. If you make a mistake in the wiring, you're in trouble. Screw connectors are the best because you can reuse them, your feeder wires don't get shortened every time you change elements, you can unhook them to test individual elements, and they really do last a very long time if you scrub them down now and then with a wire brush. If you use crimp connectors, ideally you should use high temp connectors, not just any old connector from the hardware store. Another cheap option is to do like some old kilns and make a loop at the end of the element pigtail and use a nut and bolt to secure the feeder wire to the pigtail. Put a ring connector on the end of the feeder wire, or just wrap it around the bolt. Use washers on either side of the element and wire, and a lock washer.

I didn't know you could reuse the  screw connectors, as some manufacturers include new ones with their elements. Good to know; I'll get out the Brasso and wire brush. But if you chose the nut and bolt solution, would  they have to be bronze, stainless or just steel?  Thanks, ja

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It occurs to me, after reading something regarding the conductivity of some materials used in connectors, that conductivity may not always be an issue. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong. As long as the connector is being used to compress and hold two or more wires together tightly, then the connector shouldn't need to possess conductivity. However, if the function of the connector is also to bridge the wires, as might occur with a butt connection, where there might be small space between the wires, or no overlap of the wires, then the connector should have the best conductivity possible. Certainly, materials that are heat and chemical resistant would be the best choice. So it seems that stainless steel, though it is not the best conductor, would be acceptable, provided it not used to bridge the circuit in any way.  Not proven facts, just thoughts.    john a.

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Thats one of the reasons brass is used as well as it does not fuse as one.

In lesser connections say with marine -tinned wire and connectors are used as well as brass.

Stainless is not the best conductor.The best connectors also are good conductors.

Mark

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