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Biglou13

Tumbler/ Ball Mill

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I have some feldspar chips and granite, that is a bit large for inclusions in clay. I need smaller bits. I'm thinking a ball mill/tumbler to make easy work of this. What media in tumbler/mill should I use?

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Take your feldspar and granite and put them in separate bisqued bowls. fire them to bisque temperatures in your electric kiln. The granite will now be brittle enough to pound with a hammer. Sieve to taste.

TJR.

JBaymore likes this

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I was trying to get away from pounding with hammer.

 

I have pounded with hammer, to 10 pound sledge both worked without bisque.

 

But if it makes it easier then I'll try.

 

I'll add that to list of things I have bisqued/calcined.

 

Still interested if anyone use ball mill/tumbler.......

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Ironically, I am an expert on ball milling ,having used a 30 gallon ball mill to blunge clay, and a 10 gallon ball mill to mix glazes.

In order to grind granite, or flint, you still have to calcine.

There is quite a good section on ball mills in Michael Cardew's book "Pioneer Pottery.' I'd give you the page #, but I am too lazy to go upstairs.

Ball mills are traditionally made out of porcelain, but I have seen 5 gallon plastic buckets used.

The speed is critical. you want the clay balls set at a speed to pound. Too slow, and they slide along the interior and grind your mill. Then your balls go flat.[had to say it. Sorry]

Harry Davis used to build them as well.

Try you tubing it.

TJR.

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Ball mills are traditionally made out of porcelain, but I have seen 5 gallon plastic buckets used.

The speed is critical. you want the clay balls set at a speed to pound. Too slow, and they slide along the interior and grind your mill. Then your balls go flat.[had to say it. Sorry]

TJR.
There is quite a good section on ball mills in Michael Cardew's book "Pioneer Pottery.' I'd give you the page #, but I am too lazy to go upstairs.

So learn me on the differences between that ^^

 

And a harbor freight rock polisher, some steel ball bearings, and a handful of granite chips?  http://www.harborfreight.com/garage-shop/tumblers-vibrators/3-lb-rotary-rock-tumbler-67631.html

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I also ball mill my granite and feldspar without calcining. My mill grinds to 200 mesh in 6-8 hours. I ama bit of a rebel and have a steel drum and stainless steel grinding balls.

 

Jed

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Ball mills are traditionally made out of porcelain, but I have seen 5 gallon plastic buckets used.

The speed is critical. you want the clay balls set at a speed to pound. Too slow, and they slide along the interior and grind your mill. Then your balls go flat.[had to say it. Sorry]

TJR.
There is quite a good section on ball mills in Michael Cardew's book "Pioneer Pottery.' I'd give you the page #, but I am too lazy to go upstairs.

So learn me on the differences between that ^^

 

And a harbor freight rock polisher, some steel ball bearings, and a handful of granite chips?  http://www.harborfreight.com/garage-shop/tumblers-vibrators/3-lb-rotary-rock-tumbler-67631.html

 

That rock polisher is a hobby item. I have used them to polish rocks. I think if you look at a geological supply, you might pick up a used one. they are bigger. The balls are porcelain.

TJR.

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Well i didn't get flat balls.

I didn't nor will need a mill.

After calcining I put in 5 gal bucket and mashed, not hammered with top of sledge, now I need some larger mesh screen, to get the size I want.

Thanks for the tips!

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