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anagama NHIA kiln building kiln wood firing woodfire

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#41 JBaymore

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 09:09 PM

Is the first arch layer hard brick that is then followed by k26 IFB? If so, is this going to be a salt or soda kiln that requires the hard brick liner? I'm guessing a layer of refractory castable will finish off the outer layer. Do you have to insulate the fire box thrash way?

Learning a lot from this.

Thanks,

Jed

 

The inner layer is either dry pressed high duty hard firebrick or super duty dry pressed hard firebrick. The outer layer is 2300 IFB. This is a long duration firing wood fired kiln.... hence the hard liner. Target firing is Orton cone 14. Yes, it will then get a stucco coating over the IFB.

 

best,

 

.....................john

 

PS: As a Mod I get more storage. But I am about to hit the end of that.


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#42 Babs

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 09:21 PM

Hope storage, not moderation..

I cannot imagine the foreplanning and prep you have done to get this moving sooo smoothly.

Amazing stuff.

How long will it take to get to cone 14?

how many stokers?/

Hope these students don't graduate soon so they get to use this beauty for a while.

Is there a builder's rights clause for perpetual use of the kiln?



#43 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 09:33 PM

Sorry, I meant per individual post not in total. Each one only lets me upload a max of 500kb per post and I noticed you were over this. Maybe I should upload to the gallery and then link somehow, have to look into it. Don't mean to go too off topic.

 

Cone 14 does sound like an amazing amount of work, I am sure you can make it there though.



#44 JBaymore

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 09:34 PM

Babs,

 

Storage, not moderation. :)

 

Yes, the planning has taken an astronomical amount of time... no question about that.  There have been many revisions of the kiln itself, let alone dealing with the many revised plans for the foundation and building and the detail drawings for stuff like the roof penetration point and the flashing, and such. CAD is handy.... but it is not all as fast as people think.

 

The planned cycle is a four day firing for at least the first firing.  About 1 1 /2 to 2 days to 14, and then hold for about 2 days. So that is 3 eight hour shifts per day, for 4 days, or 12 eight hour shifts....... needing 4 people on each shift "team". 

 

I am the current "kama moto" (Kiln Master) for this kiln....... so I will not only be there for a lot of the total hours of the firing....... but for the periods I am not there trying to get some sleep.... I will be "on call" like a doctor.  I live only a 20 minute drive from the Sharon campus....... so that is easy to be there fast if needed. 

 

I will be in the "kiln master" role for the forseeable future.  I will be keeping track of the use of the kiln, and of course I'll sneak in a few pieces in every firing B) .

 

But you have to remember that I have a large wood kiln myself (slightly longer than this one) sitting in my back yard.  So wood firing is not such a "novelty" option for me.... it is what I always do.  But I think this kiln will be a "doozy" for results.  We'll see.

 

best,

 

......................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#45 Benzine

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 09:37 PM

Four days of continuous, monitored firing John?  Just hit the "Quick Fire" button on the controller, enter Cone 14, and hit start...


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#46 JBaymore

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 09:47 PM

Wood firing....... the absolute MOST expensive way to fire. :rolleyes:  :)  B)

 

best,

 

...................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#47 Mark C.

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 11:27 PM

The progress is super-the kiln shed to the foundation the stainless flashing and the kiln itself. I have no idea what these kids pay for this class but its a steal no matter the cost.This baby is really looking clean

How often will this kiln get used?

Great job.Thanks for keeping us in the loop.

Mark


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#48 JBaymore

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 06:26 AM

Mark,

 

Thanks for the kind words.

 

The exact kiln useage is not yet fully determined.  We are working on that stuff.  Priority #1 is the degree programs needs, second is community education.  For the degree folks, there will be a minimum of one firing per semester.  There will eventually be access to the greater community via our Community Education program........ how that will work is not yet determined. Classes, workshops, visiting artist sessions..... not sure. 

 

The one thing that will not happen is any sort of "private kiln rental"; every kiln has a finite number of firing in it before it gets rebuilt (that # is assuming it is taken care of).  Every firing is REALLY expensive in terms of depreciation.

 

best,

 

......................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#49 Babs

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 07:26 PM

Amazing commitment, how is the quantity of wood required calculated, I ask this as I have used a woodstove for the last 40 odd years and know that wood has quite different calorific value depending on the type.

Hate to think of you getting a mid night call from site, Joh we need another truck load of wood to reach C14! :D



#50 JBaymore

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 09:44 PM

Day 12 of the NHIA anagama construction with my kiln class came and went today....... with most of us working from 9 AM until about 8:30 PM (along with torrential rain for cleaning up at the end of the day). Today was the "magic moment" wh...en the three sections of main arch forms came out and we officially had an "inside". Front firebox step arches started, more steelwork done, smoke chamber interior wall started, rear wall started, a bit more chimney added above the roof line before the rain, and horizontal flue connection to chimney worked on. Busy and LONG day.
 
That Magic Moment...............
 
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The NHIA Anagama Construction Team 2014
 
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From the firebox end:
 
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From the chimney end:
 
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best,
 
......................john

John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#51 Benzine

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 10:19 PM

Awesome!

 

I've heard stories about long ago, when they built old houses, they'd seal a cat up in the wall for good luck.  

So, my question is, which one of the workers is getting sealed up, as an offering?


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#52 Mark C.

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 12:43 AM

Out west we put a corn husker in every large kiln.

We like our cats.

Mark


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#53 Benzine

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 06:51 AM

That's a good practice Mark. It's honestly the best use for them Nebraskans...
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#54 JBaymore

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 10:21 AM

Catching up on the last two days of the NHIA anagama building project. Two LONG day to end it all off. This is from FRIDAY's work. Getting to the end of the build. Welding, finishing interior checker wall and rear wall, some castable work, and so on. And everyone is living on Ibuprofen by now.

 

 

Crap./..... ran out of mage room........ more later after I delete something somewhere.

 

best,

 

....................john

 

 


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com





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