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anagama NHIA kiln building kiln wood firing woodfire

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#21 JBaymore

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 08:46 PM

Also, was thatbsomeone "planking" on one of the forms?

 

We were checking the arch form for being level. ;) Yes.... a student planking. Our ceramics department chair has a thing for planking. We have shots of planking all over the place. It has become a department "inside joke".

 

best,

 

...................john


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#22 Babs

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 08:59 PM

wow green with envy, such feats accomplished!

Are you a bit  thingie about your level??

Only person without safety harness the man in charge??

Can't wait to see this kiln in action.

Hope the students know how fortunate they are to have this experience.

Thanks for sharing.

Love how the other students deem the planking as an every day occurence, just getting on with it around the planker! Normal behaviours for these students..



#23 JBaymore

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 11:15 PM

Only person without safety harness the man in charge??

 

Yup.... went up the ladder for a moment to make a point.... and check that they were belayed .......... then right back down. :ph34r:  

 

best,

 

...................john


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#24 JBaymore

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 06:48 AM

Yesterday was Day 8 of the NHIA anagama construction with my kiln class. A slow detail oriented day as we got ready to start on the arch. Test fitting of bricks, leveling the skews with castable, checking positions of features like steelwork, and then starting to lay arch bricks. The chimney also rises.

 

Attached File  LayingArchBricks-8-17.jpg   326.59KB   0 downloads

 

 

Attached File  PlanningSteelworkWithKurtHeinzman.jpg   335.4KB   0 downloads

 

 

Attached File  KilnAsOf-8-17.jpg   308.1KB   0 downloads

 

 

Attached File  ChimneyRises-8-17.jpg   435.01KB   0 downloads

 

 

 

best,

 

................john


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#25 Benzine

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 07:31 AM

I'm no expert John, but I don't think that thin rope, wrapped around the chimney will keep it together. I'd use mortar, or at very least, Elmer's glue.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#26 Pres

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 08:13 AM

Fell off of a metal barn roof like that when I was 17. My granddad was building a Case tractor barn for a customer. They had left tools up at the peek the day before and told me to go up and get them the next morning as they would not be working-cold, and had rained overnight. Got nearly to the peak, and hit ice, went down the slope on my belly, flipped in mid air and landed flat on my back with a big kia. Wind knocked out me, laid out in a faint, could not get up for several minutes. Finally did, no damage, not even sore, but sure could have used a safety harness that day. Ever since then, I don't trust ladders or anything, rather have something solid to hold onto. Nowadays I won't go up on anything higher than two stories.

 

I am enjoying all of the details of the kiln building, John. Your catenary arch supports-masonite over frame?. The step down area is the front of the kiln? Small loading opening, It is great to see the college crew having a good but serious time building this. I'll bet the firing parties will be awesome.


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#27 Benzine

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 08:34 AM

Pres, they say the best way to land, is on your back. It spreads out the force, from the impact. That's why we spent a while, learning how to fall (breakfalls), in my college Judo class. You land on your back, with your chin tucked to you chest, and smack the ground with both arms.

I'm not a big fan of heights either. Our first home was a single story ranch. I could jump off the top of that, without any problem. Our current house is a two story Craftsman style. I was on the roof yesterday sealing some spots. It's pretty high up. I don't use a harness, as the slope, where I'm working is slight. I do need to paint some of the exterior woodwork, and for the amount of time, I'll be up there, along with the places I'll have to be, I will be using a harness.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#28 Pres

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 10:04 AM

Yeah, took some judo/karate when I was living at Hikam AFB in the late 50's. Best I came out with was how to fall.

 

Sorry about the high jack here, John. Point being it is great to see the harnesses in use there.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#29 JBaymore

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 09:19 PM

I'm no expert John, but I don't think that thin rope, wrapped around the chimney will keep it together. I'd use mortar, or at very least, Elmer's glue.

 

That is the latest ceramic fiber rope reinforced with carbon fibers and titanium needles.  It is like ceramic duct-tape!  ;)

 

best,

 

...............john


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#30 Benzine

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 09:37 PM

 

 

best,

 

...............john

 

 

Dang, you college boys get all the fancy materials!


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#31 JBaymore

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 10:06 PM

Today we hit day 9 of the NHIA anagama construction with my kiln class. It was a short working day today because we had a major all-college meeting about the potential SNHU/NHIA merger back at the Manchester campus at 5 PM that most wanted to attend. More arch work done and I also picked up the stainless steel chimney top flashing unit.

 

 

Attached File  CheckingForLevelArch-8-18.jpg   362.93KB   0 downloads

 

 

Attached File  FlashingUnit-8-18.jpg   303.09KB   0 downloads

 

 

Attached File  KilnStatus2-8-18.jpg   326.62KB   0 downloads

 

 

Attached File  KilnStatus-8-18.jpg   357.49KB   0 downloads

 

 

best,

 

.................john


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#32 drmyrtle

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 09:11 PM

John, are most kilns built this way with the Masonite arch prop? I've never seen anything like that. Is the finale to burn out the arch prop before you fire for real? Thanks for posting the pics...it's almost like being there without doing the work ;).

#33 neilestrick

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 09:15 PM

John, are most kilns built this way with the Masonite arch prop? I've never seen anything like that. Is the finale to burn out the arch prop before you fire for real? Thanks for posting the pics...it's almost like being there without doing the work ;).

 

Every gas kiln I've built has used a form made of 2x4's and masonite for the arch. You shim the arch up an inch off the supports, then when you're done you pull the shims, the form drops down and you slide it out. I've also done where where the arch was made in 3 sections, so the middle could drop out.


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#34 JBaymore

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 06:30 AM

Yesterday was day 10 of the NHIA anagama construction with my kiln class.   Got the top flashing unit in place, continued the chimney upward, and started on the second layer of insulation over the rear arch section.  Looking at the first steps on the steelwork too.

 

Attached File  FlashingUnit1.jpg   337.38KB   0 downloads

 

 

Attached File  FlashingUnit2.jpg   224.47KB   0 downloads

 

 

Attached File  KilnAsOf-8-19.jpg   329.15KB   0 downloads

 

best,

 

....................john


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Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#35 Mug

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 07:22 AM

Almost like an Amish barn raising....

The Artsy Hippie hippster potter version



#36 Pres

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 08:07 AM

Great still shots for a kiln building lecture, not that you haven't thought of that John. :D


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#37 JBaymore

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 08:24 PM

Pres,

 

That is one reason that I document every kiln build that I do. Teaching images. I am shooting about 50 images a day.

 

best,

 

......................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#38 jrgpots

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 08:57 PM

Is the first arch layer hard brick that is then followed by k26 IFB? If so, is this going to be a salt or soda kiln that requires the hard brick liner? I'm guessing a layer of refractory castable will finish off the outer layer. Do you have to insulate the fire box thrash way?

Learning a lot from this.

Thanks,

Jed

#39 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 08:58 PM

Really nice to see it being built.

 

Can you post over 500kb per post from being a moderator or is there another trick to that?



#40 JBaymore

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 09:05 PM

Today we hit day 11 of the NHIA anagama construction with my kiln class. Into the "home stretch" for the 14 day class. Today we finished the cut key brick for the main inner hard firebrick arch, the backup insulating firebrick on the main back section of the kiln, took the chimney up to within about 1 1/2 feet of the total height, really started on the steelwork.

 

 

 

Attached File  FinishingBackupInsulationCourse.jpg   383.99KB   0 downloads

 

 

Attached File  MainFireboxSteppedRingArches.jpg   389.93KB   0 downloads

 

 

Attached File  CuttingSteelwork.jpg   322.39KB   0 downloads

 

 

Attached File  GrindingSteelwork.jpg   273.23KB   0 downloads

 

 

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Attached File  KilnAtEndOfDay-8-20.jpg   397.06KB   0 downloads

 

 

best,

 

..................................john

 

 

 


John Baymore
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Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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