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Kiln Shelves Size

shelves Corelite posts

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#1 deHues

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 07:12 PM

The kiln I am getting is 28" diameter inside. The kit comes with (6)  25.5" shelves. I may buy shelves separate so I can get Corelite shelves. There is also a 26" size which I would prefer, but, Is there usually a space left between the shelves if they are on the same level such as the bottom shelf? I most likely will be staggering the other shelf levels of. So if I have to have a space between the bottom, I could buy 2 shelves at 25.5" and 4 shelves at 26". What do you think?

 

Second question: What are your preferences for posts, square or triangle?

 

Thanks



#2 Biglou13

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 07:22 PM

Triangle. All day!!! Less room in kiln less storage space on shelf.
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#3 Biglou13

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 07:23 PM

Try before you buy. Tight shelves may damage kiln. And all full shelves limits your loading and ware size.
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#4 Mark C.

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 07:28 PM

As far a space all you need is finger space to load them between the walls-so do not get them to big.

full shelve on bottom is fine-1/2 shelves for the load up will give you better stacking options.

Now as to posts you will get more work on a shelve with triangle posts.

I have no use for square posts as they suck up wasted space.

I'm all triangle

Mark


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#5 deHues

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 10:35 PM

OK thanks, the triangle posts are made by Laguna and I have an order submitted for all my glaze materials and also the triangle posts. 

 

But I am still not clear if the firing is better if there is a space in the middle of the bottom shelf, using two halves. Wouldn't a space allow for more movement of the heat up through the center of the kiln?

 

My version of "try before you buy" will have to be relying on the knowledge of people here who have gone before me and are so gracious with advice.



#6 Mark C.

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 10:53 PM

The bottom shelve as a full shelve will fire the same (colder) as two halfs unless your kiln has a heated (element in bottom)

I personally like a full on bottom. I raised mine 1/2 of bottom with some broken shelve pieces.

If you have 1/2s it really does not matter its more about stacking space.

also there are several sizes in triangle posts are yours 2 inch or 1 1/2 inches?

Mark


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#7 bciskepottery

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 05:38 AM

A full shelf on the bottom makes sense for items that are larger than the width of halves. During firing the kiln shelves also absorb heat and expand/contract; two half shelves will expand/contract at different rates. If you have an item that sits across the two halves, it could be affected by the different rates of expansion/contraction. So, at least for the bottom, I'd go with a full shelf. I'd also go for at least one other full shelf in the event you have larger items that you do not want to hang over the edge of a half. And, as Mark C. suggested, raise the bottom shelf so that you get air circulation under the shelf to avoid cracking, allow for better heating and cooling.

#8 neilestrick

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 07:17 AM

No need for a gap between half shelves. A pot can span the joint between two shelves as long as the shelves are even, but that doesn't happen very often unless you have very clean posts and very flat shelves. Full shelves of that size can be difficult to load for some people. A 26" shelf only leaves 1 inch around for you fingers. I'd go with the 25.5" if you have a choice.


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#9 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 07:40 AM

I'd go with the 25.5" shelf halves. As all say above , the halves give you more stacking options. 

I dip both ends of my posts to avoid shelf chunks from sticking. It helps keep them clean and even with other shelves.

 

Marcia



#10 Tristan TDH

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 07:59 AM

Triangle posts are the way to go, when you are squeezing in the last little pot the extra space from the triangle may be all you need. Regarding your shelves.... In my 28" kiln I have both 26" and 25.5" shelves... Not too much difference, but the 25.5" shelves are a little easier to get in without tapping the sides or the thermocouples. That said, I'd go with corelite over solid shelves every time, much lighter, much easier to handle, and less mass for the kiln to have to hear up to temperature. Whatever you do.... Don't get a solid round shelf, I ordered a few for some reason I can't remember, and they are unusable, completely too large to handle and maneuver. Unfortunately I had kiln washed them before I discovered this, so now I'm stuck with two very large round shelves that do nothing more than lean against a wall, unused.

#11 Benzine

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 08:12 AM

Man, I guess I missed the boat on the triangle posts.  I've always used square posts.  My first two classrooms, already had them, and when I ordered posts for my current room, I just naturally went with those.  The posts the previous instructor had, were a mix of EVERYTHING.  Nearly every conceivable height, some square some triangle, but only one inch width.  The one inch width stilts, are all types of wobbly.  


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#12 neilestrick

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 09:25 AM

Triangle posts are the way to go, when you are squeezing in the last little pot the extra space from the triangle may be all you need. Regarding your shelves.... In my 28" kiln I have both 26" and 25.5" shelves... Not too much difference, but the 25.5" shelves are a little easier to get in without tapping the sides or the thermocouples. That said, I'd go with corelite over solid shelves every time, much lighter, much easier to handle, and less mass for the kiln to have to hear up to temperature. Whatever you do.... Don't get a solid round shelf, I ordered a few for some reason I can't remember, and they are unusable, completely too large to handle and maneuver. Unfortunately I had kiln washed them before I discovered this, so now I'm stuck with two very large round shelves that do nothing more than lean against a wall, unused.

 

You can cut your big shelves in half with a masonry blade on a circular saw. Wear safety goggles and a respirator.


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#13 deHues

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 02:38 PM

there are several sizes in triangle posts are yours 2 inch or 1 1/2 inches?

Mark

Yes Mark that was a question I had when I looked at the catalog. According to Benzine above, the 1" can be very wobbly. Are 1 1/2" wobbly also? So perhaps the 2" would be the best choice.



#14 Benzine

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 02:47 PM

The 1" squares were wobbly, I can't speak for the triangles.  


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#15 Mark C.

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 08:47 PM

Posts- there is much to learn as in all things ceramic.

I use 2 inch triangles -I would never use any other size but thats me and my situation .

They are from Laguna clay but not what laguna ships normally-you have to ASK for them

Posts come in all different size and I do not mean lengths .

1 inch 1 1/2 inch and 2's are just some of them-that size also is triangle or square

I need stability a car kiln.Tri posts are just such an animal

Bowls fit around them better than square posts for example

I do have some smaller 1 1/2 triangles I use in my electric bisque kiln only as its only 7 cubic feet

1 inch posts are very tippy as Benzine said-I think of them for real small hobby kilns

There are other factors in posts like what temp  are you firing to?-what is the fuel?-what is the atmosphere ?

In my salt I use soaps made from kiln bricks as salt is very hard on posts

In my car kiln I use soaps to post over 9 inches or above as they are more stable in a rolling car.

I have some 2 inch square posts when I started out 40 years ago that are still new if anyone wants to trade them for 2 inch triangles as I never use them.

One last note when you fire posts over time at cone 10-11 post will over time compress with the loads-meaning many of my say 5 inch posts are now less than 5 inches .

When I had a slip business many years ago we had a kiln full of 5 1/4 inch pots made to fire a 5 inch tall slip product to cone 10. These posts now are about 5 inches.

You will not see this in 08 temps-I have no experience with cone 6 but would guess firing 5 foot tall loads over time like I do at cone 11 would also compress them. 

Mark


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#16 Tristan TDH

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 03:47 PM

Hey Thanks for the Info Neil! I hadn't thought of that, great idea, I know someone with the equipment to do that too.

Triangle posts are the way to go, when you are squeezing in the last little pot the extra space from the triangle may be all you need. Regarding your shelves.... In my 28" kiln I have both 26" and 25.5" shelves... Not too much difference, but the 25.5" shelves are a little easier to get in without tapping the sides or the thermocouples. That said, I'd go with corelite over solid shelves every time, much lighter, much easier to handle, and less mass for the kiln to have to hear up to temperature. Whatever you do.... Don't get a solid round shelf, I ordered a few for some reason I can't remember, and they are unusable, completely too large to handle and maneuver. Unfortunately I had kiln washed them before I discovered this, so now I'm stuck with two very large round shelves that do nothing more than lean against a wall, unused.

 
You can cut your big shelves in half with a masonry blade on a circular saw. Wear safety goggles and a respirator.





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