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Top 20 Potters From Ceramics History

historical potters ceramic history teaching ceramic history 20 potters hs ceramics

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#1 clayfeetpottery

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 11:20 AM

Hello everyone! My name is Mel and I am a wheel-lover and teach Ceramics at a HS in FL.

 

I am seeking to create a weekly potters talk in my Ceramics 2 and 3 classes at the high school where I teach.(cer. 1 does basic art history each week)  I am looking to make a top 20 list of important potters/ceramic artists.

 

 

Can you all help me by answering this-WHO WOULD YOU WANT FUTURE CLAY ARTISTS AND POTTERS TO KNOW ABOUT?

 

 

No bounds except I am trying to avoid super contemporary potters (I don't ignore this in class just not part of this idea)

 

(Once I compile a list and make some image ppts. would be glad to share if interested:)

 

 

 

 

On your mark.....

get set......

Thanks!

 


-with dirty feet and happy hands,

 

   Mel

 


#2 JBaymore

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 11:35 AM

Probably the "BEST" potters......... none of us have ever heard about by name.  But their work was great, and was important in their time and some of that is likely sitting in museum cases all over the world.

 

Not a lot of time right now... and don't know how "contemporary" you really mean by "not contemporary"........but a few immediately come to mind:

 

Paulus Berenson

Lucy Rie

Hans Coper

Bernard Leach

Hamada Shoji

Peter Volkous

Rudy Autio

Paul Soldner

Robert Arneson

 

best,

 

....................john

 

PS:  I could list a lot more Japanese names......but likely not your focus.


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#3 clayfeetpottery

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 11:48 AM

Thanks for the list John!  That is a great start. 

 

This is a big deficit for me and I am determined to round out my art history for my students.  Most of them have not had art since having it every 7 days in elementary school, so Ceramics one does a basic art history talk.  I could cry at how small the exposure has been for most of them until high school. 

This is my next step. 

 

As for how contemp. is contemp. and  westerns vs. eastern... I was thinking contemporary as currently creating and showing or selling (I have a research project for this). As for location of artist...all names welcome! I may organize the talks by culture depending on who I choose.

 

So excited to get started on this!

:D


-with dirty feet and happy hands,

 

   Mel

 


#4 Chris Campbell

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 11:55 AM

There probably is no one potter by name here ...

But I think the story of the European quest for a porcelain clay body would be very interesting for this age group. It has everything from weird alchemists, kidnapping and holding prisoner of them by kings, hostage takings, recipe stealing and accidental burning down of wood and stone buildings where they were trying to fire hot kilns.

Most kids would never suspect that a pottery tale could be so adventure filled.

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#5 clayfeetpottery

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 11:59 AM

That sounds fabulous Chris!  I will add that to the list.  Thank you  sounds like a Tolkein book :)


-with dirty feet and happy hands,

 

   Mel

 


#6 JBaymore

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 12:39 PM

There probably is no one potter by name here ...

But I think the story of the European quest for a porcelain clay body would be very interesting for this age group. It has everything from weird alchemists, kidnapping and holding prisoner of them by kings, hostage takings, recipe stealing and accidental burning down of wood and stone buildings where they were trying to fire hot kilns.

Most kids would never suspect that a pottery tale could be so adventure filled.

 

The historical fiction book about this is called "The Arcanum" and is availabe at Steven Branfman's "The Potters Shop Bookstore".  http://thepottersshop.com/  Go to the bookstore section.  I think it is high school level reading.

 

The secret of porcelain got to Japan by the samurai under Warlord Hideoshi invading Korea (on his way to try to conquer China) and capturing entire villages of Korean potters and bringing them back to Japan to make pots for the various Daimyo (Feudal Lords).  When good kaolin and ptunse was dicovered in Japan...... the Koreans knew what to do with it.

 

best,

 

.......................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#7 Tyler Miller

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 12:52 PM

The Little Masters of Athens.



#8 Stephen

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 12:54 PM

John Mason might make some peoples list of top 20.



#9 JBaymore

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 01:29 PM

Oh crap... missed Michael Cardew above in that first list.  (corrected spelling 8/3 thanks babs :) )

 

best,

 

.................john


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#10 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 02:15 PM

Chris, that book about the search for porcelain in Europe is calle The Arcanum. Great read. 

 

If you look at the first ceramics show at the Whitney Museum in NYC Six Sculptors

you have

Peter Voulkos, John Mason, Kenneth Price, Robert Arneson, David Gilhooly and Richard Shaw, 

In Ceramics History in the US 

Mary Chase Perry Stratton  Founder of Pewabic Pottery

Mary Louise maclaughlin's work at Rookwood Pottery

Adelaide Robineau (the Thousand Hour Vase) and Taxile Doat at the Women's University in St. Louis. She initiated the Syracuse Ceramics National in 1929 and founded Keramos magazine

  She invited Taxile Doat to come to the US from the Sevres Porcelain factory in Paris.

Margarite Wildenhein

Maija Grotell , teacher at Cranbrook and former Bauhaus artist

Patty Warashina 

Robert Sperry

Stephen DeStabler

Charles Binns (Father of Alfred University Ceramics)

Ted Randall

Tashiko Takeaezu

Byron Temple

Maria and Julio Martinez

Potter Dave , the slave potter who captured souls in the face jugs

George Ohr, the Mad Potter of Biloxi

Bernard Palissy, French

Josiah Wedgewood

A good reference book might be 100 years of American Ceramics by Garth Clark or the collection at the ASU research center in Tempe, Az.



#11 clayfeetpottery

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 02:32 PM

Thank you Marcia! 

List is getting fabulously big


-with dirty feet and happy hands,

 

   Mel

 


#12 Diesel Clay

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 05:34 PM

I think the early days of the Bauhaus school deserves a looking at. It influenced how a lot of art programs are instructed on a college level today and it was part of the whole "is clay art, craft or design" discourse.
Also interesting for artists such as Eva Zeisel escaping the Nazis to America, and becoming a design icon.
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#13 Colby Charpentier

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 09:00 PM

John Mason might make some peoples list of top 20.

And his contemporaries... Good suggestion!



#14 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 08:32 AM

oops!

Ruth Duckworth

Franz Wildenhein- Bauhaus and School of the American Craftsmen , Rochester, NY

Otto and Vivika Heino

Beatrice Wood, and the Natzlers



#15 clayfeetpottery

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 10:18 AM

oh boy...so despite my attempt at checking for typos in the initial post a biggie slipped by. -_-  The post title was supposed to read FROM history not "form history".  Thanks for the catch- oldlady It has been fixed.

 

So, as I have been researching the names given so far I realize I have to choose between ancient ceramic history and perhaps the past 100 years or so.   I can see most of the names given focus on the latter and so shall I.

 

Thank you to all who have sent a name...now to narrow the 40 to 20!


-with dirty feet and happy hands,

 

   Mel

 


#16 JBaymore

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 11:34 AM

The "recent history" aspect was a bit what I was aluding to in my initial comment.  The older you go in the history... the less the names of potters are recorded .................except particularly in Japan (highly valued art form) , and a bit in Korea, and China.

 

If you go back in time... you might refer to types/locations of ware production... not specific artists.

 

Your BIG issuse is going to be narrowing it down to the "Top 20". ;)

 

best,

 

....................john


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Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#17 clayfeetpottery

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 11:45 AM

John...I now get what you were talking about earlier. I am trying to consider impact and the type of lifestory and artwork to most interest my teenage audience.  

 

I am really excited to see women will be a significant part of this list.

 

I may have to go to 25....


-with dirty feet and happy hands,

 

   Mel

 


#18 Bob Coyle

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 03:38 PM

Val Cushing, John Hesselberth and Ron Roy Have made a big impact on ceramics in that a good portion of the glazes used out there are derived directly from formulas derived and tested by these people. There is a lot more to ceramics than just making pots. I think the kids need to know about these people also.



#19 clayfeetpottery

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 04:56 PM

Thank you Geezer (these names hehe)! I had thought of Val Cushing but the other 2 have been added to the list. 


-with dirty feet and happy hands,

 

   Mel

 


#20 Babs

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 07:36 PM

HOpe you don't enter the Art v Craft side of life!! :D  :D  :D

Good luck with your weeding!

Maybe you could give them a big list to select one  from individually to research, and then bring together the  results fot everyone to share.

Correcting a typo John, in case this potter is not known by the original poster, Michael Cardew.






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