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What Is The Most Unconventional Item You Have Ever Used To Decorate Or Create A Piece Of Clay Art?

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#1 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 06:16 AM

What is the most unconventional item you have ever used to decorate or create a piece of clay art?We talk a lot about decorating. Now there are all types of commercial stamps and roulettes available. Do you have any unique tools you've have been using to decorate your work like seed pods, buttons, bric-a-brac? If you can show us a sample 50k pic. but not necessary.

Marcia

 

 

 

 



#2 Pres

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 06:37 AM

I use a lot of found objects. Once I in college I decorated a piece with a metal door stop. The back of the stop where it mounted on the wall had 3 holes and a lot of metal curves on the inside of the casting.

I also love a small adding machine wheel that I got 30 years ago. It is just a wheel on a metal arm. The wheel has numbers on it in order. It will put a line about a 1/16 inch wide on a pot with a series of numbers in order. It works well for organic looking lines with curves. Combined with circular impressions from dowel rods it looks like plants etc. However, when you get close your see the numbers. A nice surprise.


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#3 Chris Campbell

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 09:34 AM

I use my hot glue gun to make patterns on PVC pipes ... Instant roulette. Have rolled it into other loose materials like moss or sand while the glue was still soft to get even more texture.

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#4 Benzine

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 09:57 AM

Pres, do you have a picture of the machine arm, or a piece you used it on?

 

Chris, the hot glue on PVC is an awesome idea!


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#5 Joy pots

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 10:56 AM

I make & draw fish on pots & use the end of an inner plastic spool from an adding machine tape for the eyes.

#6 Denice

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 09:36 AM

I use to keep deeply textured wallpaper around for textured patterns on slabs.  I recently found a wood sausage stuffer at a estate sale and some odd wood spoons they work great for paddling.    Denice



#7 Marc McMillan

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 12:44 PM

Air compressor? I covered a piece with slip and then "blew" some unique texture on the piece. Combine with a glaze that likes to break in cool ways...



#8 Pres

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 09:24 AM

Pres, do you have a picture of the machine arm, or a piece you used it on?

 

Chris, the hot glue on PVC is an awesome idea!

In answer to your questions. No I do not have any pieces laying around that used the adding machine piece. However, I did take a few minutes yesterday to show you what I am talking about. Hopefully I have the space for these. These should be pretty self explanatory. Because they are metal, best used in leather hard or stiffer cheese hard clay. Wet clay they drag. You really want them to roll. At the same time angling them will get you thick to thin calligraphic lines. The flowers are simple, just a dowel end with triangular file cuts. taper the edges a bit.

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#9 oldlady

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 09:38 AM

nice stems!

 

my studio is stuffed with things that other people look at and say "Huh??"  the one that is unique is a bracket fungus from a tree where i used to live.  it has an underside that looks like the bottom of a mushroom cap but is stiff enough to press into clay.  the effect is wonderfully like an undersea water plant or coral and i use it as one of many shapes on ocean themed pieces.


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#10 Pres

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 10:01 AM

Yeah, too much stuff, and for me, not enough organization, or even space to do it in a one car garage.


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#11 Benzine

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 10:47 AM

Awesome Pres, thanks for the pics.

 

Do you use those often?


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#12 Pres

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 11:29 AM

I go through stages with things, return after a break, use in new ways, change things around. I have been thinking of these as borders on thrown pots lately.


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#13 Tyler Miller

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 02:43 PM

Something I've been tempted to do, but I've not tried yet, is to press leaves into the body of a pot, vein side down, and then use the mishima technique to bring out the veinous pattern of the leaves in a contrasting colour.  Obviously a coarse veined leaf like a maple would be necessary, but i think the effect could be really interesting if executed properly.



#14 PSC

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 04:05 PM

Everything is a potential clay tool. Before i throw anything away i look at it and say will this make a good impression in clay? A trip to the dollar store, hardware store, kitchen gadget store and of course the thrift store can net you a bevy of new tools.

A tool story: i teach handbuilding to adults. I had a student wanted to make faux driftwood from clay. I told her i had the perfect tool to make bark and headed out the classroom door. She thought i was headed to my truck to get a tool but instead i came back in with mulch chunks from the plant bed outside the classroom. They made the perfect bark texture and the perfect broken wood texture, the best tool for making faux driftwood you could find.

Now the most unconventional tool...i'm stumped...i don't know what a conventional tool is. I use a lot of random objects...pen caps, toy car tires, a tangle of jute, the bracelets i'm wearing, screws, springs, twine wrapped dowels, shells, pasta, ferns, strings of beads, keys, rope... hold it i know....my most unconventional....gutter guard...its a diamond patterned wire mesh that comes in small rolls to lay on top of your gutters to keep leaves out...makes great scale patterns when making fish or a background lattice pattern when using a floral theme.
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#15 Benzine

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 06:50 PM

Something I've been tempted to do, but I've not tried yet, is to press leaves into the body of a pot, vein side down, and then use the mishima technique to bring out the veinous pattern of the leaves in a contrasting colour.  Obviously a coarse veined leaf like a maple would be necessary, but i think the effect could be really interesting if executed properly.

 

It's probably pretty hard, to get your hand on maple leaves up there...


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#16 oldlady

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 07:28 PM

tyler, there is a potter who comes to the St. Petersburg Mainsail show in april.  he does this to big and small pots.  he washes them with dark oxide and other things similar to mishima  but the pot is basically unglazed.  fabulously beautiful.  this year i gave him a tiny pinecone (i think) from some trees at the beach.  they make a star pattern when the end is pressed just deeply enough.  i can't wait to see what he will do with them by next april.


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#17 Babs

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 08:13 PM

Everything is a potential clay tool. Before i throw anything away i look at it and say will this make a good impression in clay? A trip to the dollar store, hardware store, kitchen gadget store and of course the thrift store can net you a bevy of new tools.

A tool story: i teach handbuilding to adults. I had a student wanted to make faux driftwood from clay. I told her i had the perfect tool to make bark and headed out the classroom door. She thought i was headed to my truck to get a tool but instead i came back in with mulch chunks from the plant bed outside the classroom. They made the perfect bark texture and the perfect broken wood texture, the best tool for making faux driftwood you could find.

Now the most unconventional tool...i'm stumped...i don't know what a conventional tool is. I use a lot of random objects...pen caps, toy car tires, a tangle of jute, the bracelets i'm wearing, screws, springs, twine wrapped dowels, shells, pasta, ferns, strings of beads, keys, rope... hold it i know....my most unconventional....gutter guard...its a diamond patterned wire mesh that comes in small rolls to lay on top of your gutters to keep leaves out...makes great scale patterns when making fish or a background lattice pattern when using a floral theme.
attachicon.gifimage.jpg

With you here,everything that is not welded down, says my partner, but to the innocent drifter into my space, a couple of fresh and not so fresh whole fish for a time of nature printing! And for the long haul, the knuckle bones of kangaroos and wallaby teeth for  patterns.



#18 Tyler Miller

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 12:19 AM

 

Something I've been tempted to do, but I've not tried yet, is to press leaves into the body of a pot, vein side down, and then use the mishima technique to bring out the veinous pattern of the leaves in a contrasting colour.  Obviously a coarse veined leaf like a maple would be necessary, but i think the effect could be really interesting if executed properly.

 

It's probably pretty hard, to get your hand on maple leaves up there...

 

Real tough, Benzine. ;)



#19 TJR

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 08:50 AM

 

 

Something I've been tempted to do, but I've not tried yet, is to press leaves into the body of a pot, vein side down, and then use the mishima technique to bring out the veinous pattern of the leaves in a contrasting colour.  Obviously a coarse veined leaf like a maple would be necessary, but i think the effect could be really interesting if executed properly.

 

It's probably pretty hard, to get your hand on maple leaves up there...

 

Real tough, Benzine. ;)

 

Tyler;

That was humour he was using there. As though we don't have maple leaves in Canada.

TJR.



#20 Benzine

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:10 AM

TJR.

 

 

No, of course you don't have maple leaves/ trees.  Each household just has a tap that dispenses syrup...


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