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Best Clay For Pizza Stone?

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#1 David F.

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 02:16 PM

I have a customer that wants me to work on a prototype pizza stone about 16" diamiter. Anyone have any experience with these? What clay is best. Can cone 6 clay and glazes I already have work? If he likes it he may need about a hundred by the end of the year, so it could be worth investigating.

 


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#2 neilestrick

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 03:18 PM

Pizza stone = kiln shelf


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#3 Mark C.

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 03:34 PM

Heres a thread TJR started and we are still waiting for what he used??

http://community.cer...l=+pizza +stone

 

I agree with Neil-kiln shelve

Mark


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#4 Biglou13

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 05:44 PM

I own commercial,pizza stone and have cooked professionally with a wood burning pizza oven.
I've made a clay for raku initially, is often used for kiln "coasters". And are faring well after multiple,firings.

I'm going hypothesize that yes you can a. Successful pizza stone' as opposed to
A pizza stone would have to tolerate at most 600 F.

The cllay Imade was a a stone ware with porcelain that was groged up quite a bit.

I think the secret is in the grog.next you'll want your clay to be near vitrification if you want it resistant however an under fired piece will sustain more thermal shock
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#5 Bob Coyle

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 07:16 PM

I would use micacious clay: low fired to cone 05. No glaze. Burnish it when it is almost dry and it will look beautiful. Withstands heat shock and looks good even after oils have seeped in and made cloud patterns. 1/2 inch to 5/8 inch is probably a good thickness. You can get it from Laguna Clay and other sources rather than dig it like they do around here.



#6 TJR

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 09:51 AM

I have a customer that wants me to work on a prototype pizza stone about 16" diamiter. Anyone have any experience with these? What clay is best. Can cone 6 clay and glazes I already have work? If he likes it he may need about a hundred by the end of the year, so it could be worth investigating.

David;

I used stoneware clay that was really soft. I beat them into a frame with a 16 inch square inside opening. Do not glaze them as they need to be semi porous. I made four of them. They are still on my studio shelf. i will let you know how they turn out.

TJR.



#7 Wyndham

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 10:16 AM

Just a thought, Ferro corp makes(coriderite sp) kiln shelves and other refractory material. They may bag it dry in 50 lb bags??? If they do, that might be a possible direction for materials.

Wyndham



#8 David F.

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 02:01 PM

Mark , thanks for the link to TJR thread. TJR thanks for your input, let me know how they turn out. While the shelf idea may be the most expedient and work well; This guy has a pizzaria and wants to sell them to his customers with his and my logos on them. Like a rewards program...buy a stone with your first pizza and bring it in to get pizzas at a discount for life of pizza stone. I like the micacious clay idea as I could make them on wheel and have a very slight lip.

What do you think would be best to put my name(logo) and his on with? Any experience with numbred series items?


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#9 Babs

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 08:12 PM

 Like a rewards program...buy a stone with your first pizza and bring it in to get pizzas at a discount for life of pizza stone.

Maybe he'll not want them to have too long a shelf life!!



#10 Mark C.

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 08:32 PM

I would make them flat and stack them to bisque-the commercial ones are flat

Make it easy for yourself.

Mark


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#11 MMB

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 05:32 PM

Silk screen slip the logo onto the clay. Should be thin enough not to disrupt the dough shrinkage.






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