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Wyndham

Found A New Tool

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Well at least for me. I have always had problems glazing berry bowls(colanders). This version of my berry bowl has no foot to hold on to while glazing. If I hold the bowl with 2 fingers on the rim and thumbs on the bottom, finger marks on the glaze is annoying.

Several days ago I found a spatula in the kitchen was coming apart so I took the handle to the studio thinking to make a trimming tool.

What I did was to grind the bent end enough to fit into the center hole of the berry bowl. The bent end(about 45 deg) created a hook that held the bowl and balanced with my other hand made the best tool yet(for me) to glaze the difficult form.

Hope the attached photo shows this well enough to possibly help others.

Wyndham

 

post-31016-0-62306500-1406162465_thumb.jpg

post-31016-0-62306500-1406162465_thumb.jpg

Babs and TwinRocks like this

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Yes, when using 1 glaze but when 2 or more glazes are used, it keep the piece level for horizontal overlapping glazes.

The bottom glaze is Temoku, the top half will be a rutile blue, overlapping only part of the Temoku, then a rim dip of Nuka. All of this can be done without touching  any glaze. 

It might not be visible in the photo but the top half of this piece is unglazed, that's where the other 2 glazes go on.

Wyndham

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I also struggle with glazing pieces with holes (some of my favourite forms!) - can't pour, as the glaze dribbles through the holes, then runs and collects in thick drips! Similarly dipping. Brushing on has worked best so far, but commercial brush-on glaze is costly. Is there a simple way of making my dipping glaze ok for brushing? I've heard of CMC gum but not sure what it is (UK equivalent ?). Gum Arabic comes in small quantities, so I'm not sure it's the answer for anything other than small pieces and I don't know how much to add anyway? Any suggestions as to techniques to try or products would be most welcome.

 

I've tried to attach a photo of the aforesaid holey bowl, but my ipad photos are always too large and I have no idea if/how to compress them!

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. Is there a simple way of making my dipping glaze ok for brushing? I've heard of CMC gum but not sure what it is (UK equivalent ?). Gum Arabic comes in small quantities, so I'm not sure it's the answer for anything other than small pieces and I don't know how much to add anyway? Any suggestions as to techniques to try or products would be most welcome.

 

I've tried to attach a photo of the aforesaid holey bowl, but my ipad photos are always too large and I have no idea if/how to compress them!

Photos: save at a lower resolution, 90 or 95% will reduce the file size (compress) to way below what it is at 100%.

 

CMC is available in the UK as CMC, it's also sold as Tylose, it's most common use (afaik) is in cake icing and you will find it most easily in the *Home Baking* section of supermarkets.

 

I'll have to check (and come back later)  on how much I use, can't remember at the moment. What it does is prevent the water from being sucked out of the glaze by the bisque, this gives you more time to apply the glaze.

ELAINE BRADLEY likes this

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Thanks Ajay I'll take a look in the cooking departments, now. Re photos I don't know how to save differently on the ipad! I used to be au fait with all this on a windows PC and haven't made a full transition to the Apple technology!

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Nicely done! I've been snitching so many of our kitchen tools for clay! I am going to have to buy a new rolling pin for the kitchen or it will be the Summer of no berry pies!

It's not snitching it's liberating! :D

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I also struggle with glazing pieces with holes (some of my favourite forms!) - can't pour, as the glaze dribbles through the holes, then runs and collects in thick drips! Similarly dipping. Brushing on has worked best so far, but commercial brush-on glaze is costly. Is there a simple way of making my dipping glaze ok for brushing? I've heard of CMC gum but not sure what it is (UK equivalent ?). Gum Arabic comes in small quantities, so I'm not sure it's the answer for anything other than small pieces and I don't know how much to add anyway? Any suggestions as to techniques to try or products would be most welcome.

 

I've tried to attach a photo of the aforesaid holey bowl, but my ipad photos are always too large and I have no idea if/how to compress them!

Use photoshop or equivalent picture manager, go to edit photo and then resize. I resize to large email or something then save to desktop and attach from there.

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Thanks Babs - I'll have to see if I have a photo editor App. You'll know if I'm successful, as a photo will appear sometime! MUST get on with doing stuff now and stop procrastinating!

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I also struggle with glazing pieces with holes (some of my favourite forms!) - can't pour, as the glaze dribbles through the holes, then runs and collects in thick drips! Similarly dipping.

 

I would still dip and make a quick dip, virtually 0 count hold.  This should minimize the glaze thickness.  IF it needs to be thicker than dip a second time.   Any thick drips are easly scrapped to the same thickness once dry.  Even if you scrapped all the way to the surface to remove the thick drips,  you could quickly patch those small areas by brush and still wind up with a more uniform glaze that looks better when dipped than brushed.

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I understand where you're coming from Schmism, but my dipping skills are far from refined and I'm very fussy about the finish. With a transparent glaze over v light copper oxide wash in areas on smooth White earthenware there's not much margin of error for uneven glaze. Think I may now be able to upload a photo so you can see the pieces I'm talking about. This one's about 8" diameter and I'm bisquing the oxide on so it stays put while I glaze.post-13648-0-60246500-1406412449_thumb.jpg

How will I know if it needs to be thicker than one quick dip?

post-13648-0-60246500-1406412449_thumb.jpg

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One more thought - if I manage the dipping, could the oxide go on top to save the additional bisque fire? What difference does it make - oxides under or over transparent glaze? I use an airbrush for the oxide.

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I understand where you're coming from Schmism, but my dipping skills are far from refined and I'm very fussy about the finish. With a transparent glaze over v light copper oxide wash in areas on smooth White earthenware there's not much margin of error for uneven glaze. Think I may now be able to upload a photo so you can see the pieces I'm talking about. This one's about 8" diameter and I'm bisquing the oxide on so it stays put while I glaze.attachicon.gifimage.jpg

How will I know if it needs to be thicker than one quick dip?

Love this piece!

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Thanks all - clearly I managed to find a photo resizing app! And stuck my profile photo on while I was at it! Babs - thanks for tip re oxide on greenware - will try that.

Wyndham I've actually got a selection of v small test bowls and some tiles waiting to go in the kiln today - as soon as it's cool enough to unload the bisque. Oxide on greenware isn't one of them, but it will be for the next bisque fire!

Thanks Karen - these started out when I tried 'copying' the idea of someone's work I saw at a potters' fair - she makes beautiful pieces in porcelain, far more sophisticated than this. I have told her I'm playing with her ideas and she was fine about it. Am sure she knows it would take anyone a lifetime to reach the position she's at with her work. For my part, I have 3 of these to go into my Golf Club Prize box if they are all successful, so I hope they go down well at the Golf Club!

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I'll have to check (and come back later)  on how much I use, can't remember at the moment.

 

 

I made up a mixture of 5 grams of Tylose to 1 pint of water - I think you could easily use more Tylose, up to10 grams without any problems.

 

I used hot water and a balloon whisk, it will want to clump up if you don't work fast.

 

This will make a gloopy sort of syrup, just add some to your glaze and stir it in.

 

100ml of glaze should only need about 10ml of the mixture - it's difficult to be precise without knowing how thick/thin your glaze is already

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Thanks Ajay - in the meantime, I also found this:-

 

However if gum powder is mixed with other dry ingredients before adding them to the water it can be done (often 0.5-1.5%). A much more effective method is to boil water, add about 25-30 grams of powdered gum per litre and mix vigorously with a mechanical mixer. Normally this mixture is added during mixing to replace part of the water however I have found that for brushing it should be used to makeup the entire water complement. There is room to use 40 grams per liter if needed.

 

It sounds as if there's a wide margin for error here, so I can't go far wrong. Will definitely try some for pieces I just can't manage to dip / pour, but will test first to see how the different quantities affect the 'brushability'.

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Wydham,

 

Not to be a downer, but, if your bowl doesn't have feet how does the water continue to drain from the berries once you set it down?  Do you have a plate with an elevated ring in the center?  It seem that once sat the bowl down the water would puddle in the bottom.

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I use an app called 'resize image' as it is simple and you can choose the file size you want to output while keeping the same aspect ratio

Thanks for this one - dead easy, free and did the job!

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