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Found A New Tool


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#1 Wyndham

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 07:41 PM

Well at least for me. I have always had problems glazing berry bowls(colanders). This version of my berry bowl has no foot to hold on to while glazing. If I hold the bowl with 2 fingers on the rim and thumbs on the bottom, finger marks on the glaze is annoying.

Several days ago I found a spatula in the kitchen was coming apart so I took the handle to the studio thinking to make a trimming tool.

What I did was to grind the bent end enough to fit into the center hole of the berry bowl. The bent end(about 45 deg) created a hook that held the bowl and balanced with my other hand made the best tool yet(for me) to glaze the difficult form.

Hope the attached photo shows this well enough to possibly help others.

Wyndham

 

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#2 Mark C.

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 09:06 PM

This forms seems like a natural for dipping tongs?

Mark


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#3 Wyndham

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 07:53 AM

Yes, when using 1 glaze but when 2 or more glazes are used, it keep the piece level for horizontal overlapping glazes.

The bottom glaze is Temoku, the top half will be a rutile blue, overlapping only part of the Temoku, then a rim dip of Nuka. All of this can be done without touching  any glaze. 

It might not be visible in the photo but the top half of this piece is unglazed, that's where the other 2 glazes go on.

Wyndham



#4 Pots by Char

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 09:02 AM

thanks Wyndham for a really great idea..I am tempted to go break a spatula just to try it out.

#5 Wyndham

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 11:52 AM

There are plenty at Goodwill :)

Wyndham



#6 TwinRocks

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 12:08 PM

Nicely done! I've been snitching so many of our kitchen tools for clay! I am going to have to buy a new rolling pin for the kitchen or it will be the Summer of no berry pies!

#7 Celia UK

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 03:31 AM

I also struggle with glazing pieces with holes (some of my favourite forms!) - can't pour, as the glaze dribbles through the holes, then runs and collects in thick drips! Similarly dipping. Brushing on has worked best so far, but commercial brush-on glaze is costly. Is there a simple way of making my dipping glaze ok for brushing? I've heard of CMC gum but not sure what it is (UK equivalent ?). Gum Arabic comes in small quantities, so I'm not sure it's the answer for anything other than small pieces and I don't know how much to add anyway? Any suggestions as to techniques to try or products would be most welcome.

I've tried to attach a photo of the aforesaid holey bowl, but my ipad photos are always too large and I have no idea if/how to compress them!

#8 ayjay

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 04:28 AM

. Is there a simple way of making my dipping glaze ok for brushing? I've heard of CMC gum but not sure what it is (UK equivalent ?). Gum Arabic comes in small quantities, so I'm not sure it's the answer for anything other than small pieces and I don't know how much to add anyway? Any suggestions as to techniques to try or products would be most welcome.

I've tried to attach a photo of the aforesaid holey bowl, but my ipad photos are always too large and I have no idea if/how to compress them!

Photos: save at a lower resolution, 90 or 95% will reduce the file size (compress) to way below what it is at 100%.

 

CMC is available in the UK as CMC, it's also sold as Tylose, it's most common use (afaik) is in cake icing and you will find it most easily in the *Home Baking* section of supermarkets.

 

I'll have to check (and come back later)  on how much I use, can't remember at the moment. What it does is prevent the water from being sucked out of the glaze by the bisque, this gives you more time to apply the glaze.



#9 Celia UK

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 05:16 AM

Thanks Ajay I'll take a look in the cooking departments, now. Re photos I don't know how to save differently on the ipad! I used to be au fait with all this on a windows PC and haven't made a full transition to the Apple technology!

#10 Babs

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 05:31 AM

Nicely done! I've been snitching so many of our kitchen tools for clay! I am going to have to buy a new rolling pin for the kitchen or it will be the Summer of no berry pies!

It's not snitching it's liberating! :D



#11 Babs

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 05:33 AM

I also struggle with glazing pieces with holes (some of my favourite forms!) - can't pour, as the glaze dribbles through the holes, then runs and collects in thick drips! Similarly dipping. Brushing on has worked best so far, but commercial brush-on glaze is costly. Is there a simple way of making my dipping glaze ok for brushing? I've heard of CMC gum but not sure what it is (UK equivalent ?). Gum Arabic comes in small quantities, so I'm not sure it's the answer for anything other than small pieces and I don't know how much to add anyway? Any suggestions as to techniques to try or products would be most welcome.

I've tried to attach a photo of the aforesaid holey bowl, but my ipad photos are always too large and I have no idea if/how to compress them!

Use photoshop or equivalent picture manager, go to edit photo and then resize. I resize to large email or something then save to desktop and attach from there.



#12 Celia UK

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 05:37 AM

Thanks Babs - I'll have to see if I have a photo editor App. You'll know if I'm successful, as a photo will appear sometime! MUST get on with doing stuff now and stop procrastinating!

#13 schmism

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 03:03 PM

I also struggle with glazing pieces with holes (some of my favourite forms!) - can't pour, as the glaze dribbles through the holes, then runs and collects in thick drips! Similarly dipping.

 

I would still dip and make a quick dip, virtually 0 count hold.  This should minimize the glaze thickness.  IF it needs to be thicker than dip a second time.   Any thick drips are easly scrapped to the same thickness once dry.  Even if you scrapped all the way to the surface to remove the thick drips,  you could quickly patch those small areas by brush and still wind up with a more uniform glaze that looks better when dipped than brushed.



#14 Celia UK

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 05:13 PM

I understand where you're coming from Schmism, but my dipping skills are far from refined and I'm very fussy about the finish. With a transparent glaze over v light copper oxide wash in areas on smooth White earthenware there's not much margin of error for uneven glaze. Think I may now be able to upload a photo so you can see the pieces I'm talking about. This one's about 8" diameter and I'm bisquing the oxide on so it stays put while I glaze.Attached File  image.jpg   33.6KB   2 downloads
How will I know if it needs to be thicker than one quick dip?

#15 Celia UK

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 05:41 PM

One more thought - if I manage the dipping, could the oxide go on top to save the additional bisque fire? What difference does it make - oxides under or over transparent glaze? I use an airbrush for the oxide.

#16 Karen B

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 06:32 PM

I understand where you're coming from Schmism, but my dipping skills are far from refined and I'm very fussy about the finish. With a transparent glaze over v light copper oxide wash in areas on smooth White earthenware there's not much margin of error for uneven glaze. Think I may now be able to upload a photo so you can see the pieces I'm talking about. This one's about 8" diameter and I'm bisquing the oxide on so it stays put while I glaze.attachicon.gifimage.jpg
How will I know if it needs to be thicker than one quick dip?

Love this piece!



#17 Babs

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 07:03 PM

YOu could put the copper wash onto grenware prior to bisquing for the first and only time. Depending on the glaze you may get the same effect as an onglaze wash.



#18 Wyndham

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 07:05 PM

Celia, it might be helpful for you to make some test tiles or small bowls to test these methods and see which works better.

Wyndham



#19 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 07:47 PM

I use an app called 'resize image' as it is simple and you can choose the file size you want to output while keeping the same aspect ratio

#20 Pres

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 11:26 PM

Gimp is an open source albeit free program you can also use to resize photos


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





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