Jump to content
TwinRocks

Signing Your Work, What Is Your Method?

Recommended Posts

TwinRocks    17

I've noticed a trend in marking pottery with an extremely small stamp with no other form of signature. Do people generally do this on dishware only or on more extensive sculptural work as well?

 

I am curious how others prefer to mark their work. Do you sign with a needle tool? Use a chop or seal! Have a stamp made? What information do you try to convey?

 

Some of the stamps I've seen used are so small and simple it wouldn't lend a clue for someone who bought it to remember the maker. Do you prefer a simple mark or something more identifiable? Do you use your name, a symbol or both? I know there are as many options as answers to these questions, but I am curious and I would love to see some examples.

 

Clearly this is also somewhat pointed. I am not fully satisfied with my marking method and I am considering a custom stamp, or more immediately re-carving a soap stone signature chop I had fashioned myself for other purposes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TJR    359

I sign my name with a brush and oxide on the bottom of all my pots.

TJR.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
synj00    17

I have a TERRIBLE scribble scrabble signature which is barely consistent. I prefer a small stamp. I'm still learning but I think I'll probably always prefer a stamp if anything. Some of the greats never signed their work and compromised only by signing on the decorative boxes that they sold in. It interferes with the mingei folk-art concept as I am familiar with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joy pots    20

I've used several methods throughout the years from signing with an older long tip pen to a stamp. I also had a ring with my coat of arms which I had made into a rubber stamp. I have reverted back to the long nibbled pen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ayjay    119

With a Porcupine quill, it's better than a needle tool, doesn't cut so much and leaves less burrs.

 

DSCF1787-sig2_zpsde16802b.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Celia UK    142

I made a small stamp of my 3 initials, carved into the end of a coil of clay - about 6mm diameter. It took several attempts to get it right - first time I got it in reverse! Then there was one piece that kept falling out and spoiling the letters! I carved back the space around the letters, leaving them standing proud, which are then an impression, when I stamp my pots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hershey8    13

Ball point pen works for me.

           

                                                       john autry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
alabama    144

Hey,

    When I sign my work,

    I use a needle tool made from a blow gun dart that Michael Hanson made me in April of 1990.

I sign my name and date backwards but put the lbs. and cone temperature on frontwards as well

as any other information.  I'm not sure what a stamped signature will mean in 20, 30, or 40 years

from now, if its only initials.  I also stain the bottom with black iron oxide to make the information visible.

Its useless if you can't make out the name and/or date. 

see you later.

Alabama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pres    896

Most times I place a small piece of thin plastic bag on top of the pot, then use a dull pencil to sign the pot, and a lead "R" to finish. No burrs with the thing plastic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hershey8    13

I sign my name with a brush and oxide on the bottom of all my pots.

TJR.

So, you mix an oxide with water, and paint it on. Or is their something else you add for so it will paint on easily? I have to sign some dark, already bisqued clay body. I'm thinking titantium ox and water. What think?  ja

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joseph F    867

Bumping an old thread. I am having a hard time marking some of my work. I can't stamp it because the walls are too thin and it leaves the stamp mark on the inside of the pot. I can't sign anything for crap because my handwriting looks amateur hour. I thought about just not signing my work at all. I sort of sign all my work anyways with my decoration. I leave 3 dots on all my work. It has a special meaning to me, but I don't know if my customers would ever know it. Do customers find it odd if you don't sign it? Does it devalue the piece in their eyes? I am not sure what to do about this.  

I thought about using iron oxide and a brush and just signing an F to the bottom of everything in a unique way. But I am not sure if that is any better than my signature. Meh.

Thoughts? This hasn't been a problem until now, I usually dont take the time to stamp my work because it eventually all gets hammered, but its going into the world now and I figure customers want it marked. Bleh. 

I thought about wax resist signage on the inside of my foot. Lightly sprayed it would turn into a reddish color with dots of glazes sticking over the wax. Again not sure if this is good or bad. Guess I will just have to try different techniques.

Edited by Joseph F

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dhPotter    148

The other day I gave a mug to my bone doc. The first thing he did was turn it over and look at he bottom. 

Many years ago, a sculptor professor looked at one of my mugs. Turned it over to look at the bottom. I had my pottery mark on it but did not sign the pot. He said always sign your pots because the average user will think it is machine made without your signature.

I sold a platter to a customer that I work with. The platter was signed and had the pottery mark. Not good enough. They were mad because I had not dated the piece.

I use the china pencils to make my signature on greenware. I do single fire glazing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joseph F    867
19 minutes ago, dhPotter said:

The other day I gave a mug to my bone doc. The first thing he did was turn it over and look at he bottom. 

Many years ago, a sculptor professor looked at one of my mugs. Turned it over to look at the bottom. I had my pottery mark on it but did not sign the pot. He said always sign your pots because the average user will think it is machine made without your signature.

I sold a platter to a customer that I work with. The platter was signed and had the pottery mark. Not good enough. They were mad because I had not dated the piece.

I use the china pencils to make my signature on greenware. I do single fire glazing.

My dad is like this too. He thinks every piece should be signed, dated and kissed. I just don't understand it. I don't think people will think my work is machine made, but I guess I need to figure out this signature thing. Maybe take some slip/mortar and just slap it on there then stamp that. Could work pretty well and its visual.

Edited by Joseph F

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Judith B    52

@Joseph F,

can you sign using a pencil? I mean one with oxides, or something that will resist the firing? That way you don't have to leave a mark on the clay, it's only on the surface

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joseph F    867
4 minutes ago, Judith B said:

@Joseph F,

can you sign using a pencil? I mean one with oxides, or something that will resist the firing? That way you don't have to leave a mark on the clay, it's only on the surface

I don't bisque, so the pencil just cuts into the side of the clay. This is my stamp, which I had made from an ink brushing I did. I could repeat this sort of each time on the pot. Of course it would look different each time, but I am not sure if that is super important or not. I still think the slip mortar might be the best thing to do.

 

logo.jpg.98c3aa73c05744e7190d84955119824d.jpg

Edited by Joseph F

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris Campbell    1,088

I just bought some work from a potter who uses decorative decals on the work but also has decals for her name ... in several sizes. So her name is very easy to read on the bottom of all the work. Such a simple solution.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sputty    73

This is an interesting topic. When I potted in the UK, I made me a little bisque stamp with my initials, to impress into my work. It's what everybody does there. When I came across a cute little wooden fabric stamp from India, I added that next to my stamp, intending it to be a year mark. As I've used it every year since, it's more of an aeon mark, but hey...

Anyway, when I moved to France I carried on doing this, but kept getting asked what the impressions were. Turns out it's more normal here to brush or otherwise do a signature on the bottom of your pot - many do a fluid scratch into the greenware. I've kept on with my stamps, but at some point I'll have to switch to scribbled signatures. I might get a rubber stamp and use it with an oxide, or something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mark C.    1,807

I sign with the back end of a metal needle tool.-been doing that for 40 plus years-I tried the chop but it was to much extra work to get the clay just right. When your volume of work is large ,extra steps need to make more sense and that one did not.

Edited by Mark C.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×