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Frits: Too Many Numbers And Too Little Info

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#1 jrgpots

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 09:52 PM

Does anyone have a brief list of the most commonly used frits and their uses, properties, and effects?

Jed

#2 Tyler Miller

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 11:42 PM

Digitalfire's a pretty good resource of information on the most common frits available as well as some of the less common.



#3 jrgpots

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 12:26 AM

I went there first. It helps for common frits like Ferro 3134, 3124, 3110, but not many others.... I'm still confused!!!

What I would love is a chart that breaks down firing range, type frit and matching COE.
(kind of like the following.)
I' m not asking for much..... ;)....Right?


A. Low fire frits............................COE
.,............................. Lo........Med......Hi
1. Boron.
2. Lo aluminum
3. Hi aluminum
4. Lo calcium

B. Med fire frits
1.
2.
3.
4.

C. Hi fire frits
1.
2.
3.
4.

D Specialty frits.

It would be great to have 3 examples of each category giving a range of COE from lo, med, and hi.


So if there is an OCD potter out there that has anything like this alreday made up, please share.

Otherwise, my OCD tendencies will force me to expend much energy, try to create order, and go against the second law of thermodynamics.....yuk.

Jed



#4 Tyler Miller

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 12:53 AM

Does this pdf from Laguna help organize things?

 

http://www.lagunacla...cc_fritdata.pdf



#5 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 07:06 AM

Frank Gaydos listed 116 Frits and equivalents here with breakdowns:

 

http://home.comcast....ydos/frits.html

 

Marcia



#6 Matt Oz

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 07:24 AM

Here is another Ferro chart from their web site.

http://www.ferro.com pottery frits 2008.pdf



#7 JBaymore

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 07:34 AM

You are thinking about frits from a marerials based approach,. And if ANY raw material is all about the chemistry... it is frits. That is why they were developed. To understand frits.... think of them as oxide suppliers. And then spend t ime understanding the glaze chemsitry behind what those frits were designed for.

 

Frit X is not a "low fire frit"..... it is a source of a large number of Z oxide relative to Y oxide with a trace of Q oxide, so that allows you to get the oxide balance in a glaze to the point you need to melt in this range or develop this color. And so on.

 

best,

 

........................john


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Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#8 jrgpots

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 05:51 PM

Frank Gaydos listed 116 Frits and equivalents here with breakdowns:

 

http://home.comcast....ydos/frits.html

 

Marcia

Thank you. That really helped.  I have saved a copy to my hard drive and paper collection.

 

Jed



#9 jrgpots

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 05:54 PM

You are thinking about frits from a marerials based approach,. And if ANY raw material is all about the chemistry... it is frits. That is why they were developed. To understand frits.... think of them as oxide suppliers. And then spend t ime understanding the glaze chemsitry behind what those frits were designed for.

 

Frit X is not a "low fire frit"..... it is a source of a large number of Z oxide relative to Y oxide with a trace of Q oxide, so that allows you to get the oxide balance in a glaze to the point you need to melt in this range or develop this color. And so on.

 

best,

 

........................john

Thank you John..........I'm still on the steep end of the learning curve.  By-the-way, how long is the learnig curve steep. On second thought....don't tell me.

 

Jed






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