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Defective Amaco Wax Resist?


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#1 MichaelP

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 04:08 PM

I just opened a new jar of Amaco wax resist. I bought it a few months ago and kept indoors.

 

I mixed it well, and its appearance is normal. However, when I brush it on, it creates large particles of (I assume) wax on top of the film. After application, it looks like an old paint that has a lot of dry fragments inside.

 

Again, there are no fragments inside the liquid. They're created under the brush while I'm applying wax resist.

 

Did anybody have the same problem? Is there any way to fix the liquid, or I'll need to buy a new one? Microwaving followed by mixing maybe? Or perhaps adding water?



#2 Mark C.

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 10:44 PM

Call them up (Amaco) and see what they say?

Never used that wax so have no imput.

Mark


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#3 MichaelP

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 02:05 PM

OK, after five calls to Amaco and leaving messages and reminders, I finally got their "technical support". They don't know how their suppliers store their products, therefore, I'd need to order from Amaco directly to make sure the product is fresh and works as advertized. And no, they're not going to replace the defective product.

 

Well, next time I order anything, I'll try to avoid Amaco whenever possible.



#4 Min

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 03:00 PM

I think it would still work. If you ran a heat gun over the bits they should melt out. (heat gun on low setting so you don't blow it onto the unwaxed parts)  Running the heat gun over then quickly wiping with a scrap of saran wrap leaves a really slick surface like using hot wax.

 

Not a perfect solution but it would save throwing it out.



#5 bciskepottery

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 08:51 PM

Well, next time I order anything, I'll try to avoid Amaco whenever possible.


I use Forbes wax; only place I found to order it from is from Highwater Clay. Smooth and fast drying . . . really fast. Have not had any clumping.

#6 Christophorio

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 11:33 PM

I've had to think back to my emulsions experience.

To make an emulsion like wax and water combine you need to add a third ingredient; an emulsifier.

Beeswax, water and Borax is a good example.

The percentages are important.

If you have too much wax you get a glutenous glob that seperates out from the water.

If you have too much emulsifier it turns gritty. That sounds like what you have.

As an experiment, maybe you could try adding some shredded beeswax back into the mix and carefully heating it up to see if it might smooth out the emulsion.

I really don't know if it will go back the other way.

 

Chris



#7 MichaelP

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 09:51 PM

Thank you guys. Good suggestions.

 

Chris, I'm definitely going to try playing with it. My gut feeling was that the wax settles in globules due to oversaturation. In this case more solvent would help. But since this is an emulsion rather than a simple solution, as you rightfully noted, I may need to approach it differently. Thank you.



#8 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 11:53 PM

I bought some wax resit and I have no idea how to use it. It smells funny and is quite thick. Tried watering it down, tried painting it onto a pot with mega failure. Might practice again sometime.

 

Gave up and went back to a sponge and water.



#9 Mark C.

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 12:59 AM

High bridge

Wax is easy to work with-use a  cut sponge or brush to apply -let dry-then glaze pots.I set the pots on paper after waxing as it leaves a ring on a table. With detail work like cover a glaze say on a fish eye I use a brush but for po bottoms with feet I use a water dampened  cut sponge which

I leave in a low palstic cover tub with the wax in it.

have used many waxes but now only use Laguna clay's Mobilcer A

I thin it with a dab of water to sponge the bowl feet.

Mark

 

 
Mobilcer-A is the industry standard for was resist. Water based petroleum wax emulsion for decorating. Glaze is resisted where wax is applied. This wax resist is an excellent ready-to-use product. It has the result of paraffin wax without the mess or danger of heating. Mobilcer-A is thicker than Axner Premium Wax Resist and comes with instructions on how to thin it to your desired consistency.if ordering for shipment to cold regions during the Winter seasons.

Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com




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