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Babs

Galley On Pot Or Flange On Lid..

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Not naive. It depends on the function of the pot. For casseroles, the gallery should be on the pot to prevent the baked goods from boiling over. 

The lid of a teapot should be elongated to put the center of gravity on the lid deeper inside the pot to prevent accidents when pouring hot tea.

There are all types of needs for the

design of the lid and the gallery . Do some research. It can be very interesting. Check Robin Hopper's Functional Pottery of Pioneer Pottery by Cardew. 

 

oops! gallery not galley....another craft moment!

 

 

Marcia

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There's probably more room for a galley in the body of the pot, rather than just on the lid:)

 

Seriously though, I make a lot of covered jars, and I prefer putting the gallery in the pot. I find the way it squishes into being very satisfying. Although if I'm making teapots, the lid gets a flange.

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I used to struggle with both flanged lids as well as gallery rims.  Anymore, if it is a teapot or a lidded mug it gets a flanged lid.  Otherwise it starts with a gallery.  And, by the way, moving away from simple calipers to a lid master calipers took away much of the struggle either way.

 

-Paul

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I used to struggle with both flanged lids as well as gallery rims.  Anymore, if it is a teapot or a lidded mug it gets a flanged lid.  Otherwise it starts with a gallery.  And, by the way, moving away from simple calipers to a lid master calipers took away much of the struggle either way.

 

-Paul

 

I love the concept of the Lid Master calipers, but I'm not a fan of the execution. I wish they were made of aluminum or stainless, and that the ends were a lot less bulky. And the price, like all things Giffin, is crazy high.

 

Most of the lids I make are flange type. On a lidded jar it makes for easier access into the jar, and i like the drama of the lip. But for large lids like on a casserole, the inset gallery lid is much easier to make and isn't so heavy.

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All my lidded pots have a lid flange not a gallery. Just don't like the look of a ring of unglazed clay at the top of the pot. Should say I mostly use dark glazes on a white clay, might make differently with a dark clay / dark glaze or light clay / light glaze combo.

 

edit: for small pots I use freebie calipers made from cutting the corners off a metal coat hanger. About 4 or 5" on each side. The thickness of the wire is wide enough so that I measure with the outside edge for outside of the pot and the inside edge for the inside of the flange. (sounds way more confusing than it is)

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I also believe that flanged lid or galley depends on the pot. Casseroles, a galley, but alid with a short flange ensuring that the lid is on. Large jars the flanged lid to hold on the jar with decorative top. Teapots I have done both ways, but always remember the vent hole. Thing is, look at the functio. Does it need awide lip edge and galley to keep food from slopping on to the table, then design it with one. After all even functional ware can be designed by an artist to function better and be aesthetic.

When using calipers I mark the distance on astraight line and then reverse the calipers uing the marked measurement. I usually throw multiples thus using the same marks over and over even months later.

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A friend of mine works as a production potter at a local pottery studio, and also teaches children's classes at the Arts Center where I get all my stuff glazed and fired. I was having trouble with stuck lids because I didn't leave enough unglazed on the gallery....and he told me that they don't fire lidded vessels together, and they don't leave parts of the pot or lid unglazed, either. Galleries are fully glazed, as are lid flanges, and they're fired on stilts if necessary. Anyway, I thought that was interesting because all the books I've seen say to fire the pieces together.

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Yes  function dictates for me, but I thought I may be missing stuff.

Teapoots I put a flange on the lid but it is also seated in a gallery, thanks Stellaria.

i bought a casserole with a lid which fitted neatly over the top of the casserole, it was sold as a bean pot. But yes Marcia the contents would be bubbled over onto the oven floor. A nice round pot but not functional.

Hole in or not in a tagine?

Flanged lids for jams etc  messy as the flange hits the contents.

Stellaria i always fire the lids in the pots, less warping poss. in the pot. Put some colour in your wax or resist as you can see more easily the line of the resist

Edit : on the lid see bold.

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I use food coloring in my wax resist, add a touch of water, and apply it with a make up sponge. I make a lot of boxes and all of this makes it super easy to apply the wax, see where it is, control application and keep it thin enough that it burns cleanly away.

 

I always fire my bottoms and tops together with the wax on the seam. It would be an interesting test to see if I would have more mismatches if I glazed everything and stilted the top and bottom and fired them separately. There are times when no bare edges would be nice.

 

Terry

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Naive question I know, but do you have any pics that show the difference? I've heard both terms, but not absolutely clear. Thank you!

Here are some sketches from Daniel Rhodes "Pottery Form"

Hope it is clear enough, Celia

Above book is great.

post-21244-0-08626900-1405834693_thumb.jpg

High Bridge Pottery likes this

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Thanks Babs - I know that the gallery is the little rim inside the top edge of e.g. a teapot, but which part is the flange?

The flange is the 'ridge" of clay protruding from the lid which fits into the top of the pot seen distinctly in 4 above. I call the dropped down section of hte lid seen in 2 a sort of flange but that type of lid also sits on a gallery.so as I've been known to call a gallery a galley in the past, don't be influenced by me! Awful English sorry.

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Plain speak is the best unless you're trying to pull the wool over eyes :)

I also really have to fight the urge to spell flange as phlange.. where does that come from? Better go check the roots.

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The form dictates which type of lid to use

for example a honey pot or casserole I use the outer pot for the lip

whereas the pot in my avatar uses the inner gallery as part of the lid

Form for me always tells me what type to use.

Mark

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Like others have wisely mentioned already in the thread, function should dictate the form of the lid.

 

The Val Cushing Handbook has a great section on lids. There are drawings of all sorts of different shapes, do's and don'ts, critical mistakes, tips, etc. When teaching lids to my students I'll share these pages and frame the discussion around function, then over the course of a couple weeks cover (no pun intended) 5 lids:

- Basic Flange "The Hat" thrown upside down

- Basic Gallery "The Bowl" thrown upside down

- Flange + Gallery w/Inset Knob thrown rightside up

- Flange + Gallery w/Attached Knob thrown upside down

- The Russian Doll thrown as a closed form then trimmed gallery and flange

So many lids, so little time.

 

Someone also brought up firing lids atop their corresponding jar/teapot versus firing them separately. I'm all for firing lids along with their corresonding piece. Where the clay is going to experience change and movement as it shrinks, I want the set to experience all this change together as one piece.

 

My two cents.

 

C

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