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Why Don't Elements Glow Outside The Kiln.


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#1 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 07:46 AM

Ok, so elements come out the kiln to attach to wires. Why don't they glow? This has always confused me.

#2 Chris Campbell

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 10:34 AM

Are you talking about wires? They are usually insulated. If you touch the cord on something like an electric kettle or even your hair dryer you will notice it gets warm.

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#3 neilestrick

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 10:51 AM

The section of the element that goes through the wall and attaches to the feeder wires is called the 'pigtail'. Take a close look at them and you'll notice that they are twisted double thick. That keeps that section from heating up.


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#4 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 12:26 PM

Thanks neil, I always wondered why you needed pigtails and now I know why

#5 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 05:24 PM

One more question, why does everybody attach all the electrics to the outside of the kiln where it gets hot and moist? Is there a reason not to run wires to the elements from a seperate box or is it easier to manufacture them that way + less wire.

#6 neilestrick

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 05:49 PM

One more question, why does everybody attach all the electrics to the outside of the kiln where it gets hot and moist? Is there a reason not to run wires to the elements from a seperate box or is it easier to manufacture them that way + less wire.

 

It's easier and faster and therefore cheaper to attach it all to the side of the kiln. Easier to ship, too. There are some kilns, such as the L&L Davinci models, that have all the electronics housed in a free-standing box, however that's because there's just too many parts and big relays to fit into a kiln mounted box. That's a good question, though, because relays, and electronics in general, last longer if they are kept cool. I see more relay failure in certain brands of kilns due to their design.


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#7 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 04:44 AM

Yea that is what I thought, easier and faster.

 

I might try moving my relays off the kiln as I think I have enough wire left over to do that. Now it is fixed I would like to keep improving on its life span and remove as much of the electronics away from the water vapour and heat generated in the kiln.



#8 neilestrick

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 10:25 AM

I don't think the water vapor is such an issue inside the control box. Heat is the big culprit. Humidity from environment will corrode the electrical way more than vapor from the kiln, as the vast majority of the kiln vapor goes out the lid, peeps or vent.


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#9 Arnold Howard

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 10:04 AM

Twisting the ends of the element with an extra piece of wire reduces the electrical resistance at the pigtails. If an element connector is loose, however, the connector will glow pink. The connectors and terminals must be tight. A loose connector on a relay will produce enough heat to destroy the relay.

 

Sincerely,

 

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