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Gluing Pieces Before Glazing


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#1 Riorose

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 04:43 AM

Good morning friends:
Does anyone have experience with gluing pieces that have broken or fallen off during bisque firing? Here people sometimes use UHU glue to glue pieces on before dipping in glazes and then glaze firing.

I have done this successfuly with a tiny piece but does any body know if this works for sprigs or heavier pieces? I have a vase where i sculpted leaves and pears then I attached them. The pear fell off during bisque firing and i want to glaze. I actually already used E6000 on the piece but now I wonder if it will melt and fall before the glaze can secure it?

The piece is German stoneware and I want to use a cone 6 glaze.
Thank you
Rosemary

#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 07:25 AM

Hi Riorose, &nbsp;**beware of weird edited notations that don't make sense!**<br>I have reattached pieces using a paperclay patch. I reattached a student's handle to a pitcher and after the last firing it was strong enough to use full of a liquid. The glue is not a good idea. You will need to re-bisque after patching with paperclay.<br><font color="#1C2837"><font face="arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif"><font size="2">repairing with paper clay:Try to make a a few tablespoons worth at a time. It molds so no need to make more until needed.Take some of your dried clay and pulverize it with a rolling pin or spoon. Try for a 1/4 cup.&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;In a container, soak toilet paper...maybe a couple of feet or a yard or so. Tear it up into small pieces and soak over night. Squeeze some of the water out of it. In a blender put the toilet paper mash, add some water so the toilet paper can be fluid, add a little vinegar (1/2-1 tsp or so) , some karo syrup (1/4-1/2 tsp or so) , a dash of sodium silicate (a drop or two) and then clay. Blend to a thick paste consistency. You want the clay to be the prime ingredient. The toilet paper can be 15-25% of the volume. By squeezing it, you can visualize this estimate.Before applying the paste, wet the bisque surface so it doesn't suck in the moisture from the paste too quickly.&nbsp;&nbsp;You can even re-attach broken parts using this system. Re-bisque fire the repaired piece.</font></font></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" color="#1C2837" face="arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: small;">You can cut back on water and increase both the vinegar and karo syrup.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" color="#1C2837" face="arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: small;"><br></span></font><font color="#1C2837"><font face="arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif"><font size="2">Marcia</font></font></font>

</div>

#3 bridgespottery

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 03:06 PM

Re: Glue
If a small piece needs to be re-attached before a final glaze - there are a few variable that make or break it for me.

I sometimes glue the piece on and then glaze it well around the attached part. If the attached part is going to fall off based on gravity - then it may do so in the kiln. If it's something like a knob on top of a lid, then gravity will keep it there regardless of the glue.
If the attached piece is on the side hanging off - it never works, if it's sitting on something it works.
Best of luck.

Patricia Bridges
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#4 Riorose

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 04:03 PM

Re: Glue
If a small piece needs to be re-attached before a final glaze - there are a few variable that make or break it for me.

I sometimes glue the piece on and then glaze it well around the attached part. If the attached part is going to fall off based on gravity - then it may do so in the kiln. If it's something like a knob on top of a lid, then gravity will keep it there regardless of the glue.
If the attached piece is on the side hanging off - it never works, if it's sitting on something it works.
Best of luck.

Patricia Bridges
Bridges Pottery
www.bridgespottery.com



#5 Riorose

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 04:06 PM

Yep, and yep. I thought that gravity was going to be my enemy here and this is confirmed. Now I have to pull it apart and use the paperclay remedy. Thanks to you both.



#6 Mossyrock

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Posted 14 December 2010 - 09:23 AM

I tried the glue.....and learned the hard way that was not a good idea. So now I use paperclay to repair cracks and reattach handles, etc. I mix up about a quart of paperclay and keep it in an airtight container. I haven't had a problem with mold and have used from the same container for over a year. I put slip I have made using Magic Water in a blender, add shredded insulation purchased at a hardware store, and blend well. It's nice to have it already mixed when I need to make a repair.
Brenda Moore
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#7 Les

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Posted 14 December 2010 - 09:18 PM

I have used Amaco's Bisque Fix and can verify it works very well. I have even used it to repair green ware by mixing it with a small amount of slip for a color match with darker clays. It dries rock hard and fires well. Just follow the instructions, and do not sand or inhale.

Use this link to view: http://www.amaco.com...bisque-fix.html

#8 Riorose

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 08:20 PM

Hi Riorose, &nbsp;**beware of weird edited notations that don't make sense!**<br>I have reattached pieces using a paperclay patch. I reattached a student's handle to a pitcher and after the last firing it was strong enough to use full of a liquid. The glue is not a good idea. You will need to re-bisque after patching with paperclay.<br><font color="#1C2837"><font face="arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif"><font size="2">repairing with paper clay:Try to make a a few tablespoons worth at a time. It molds so no need to make more until needed.Take some of your dried clay and pulverize it with a rolling pin or spoon. Try for a 1/4 cup.&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;In a container, soak toilet paper...maybe a couple of feet or a yard or so. Tear it up into small pieces and soak over night. Squeeze some of the water out of it. In a blender put the toilet paper mash, add some water so the toilet paper can be fluid, add a little vinegar (1/2-1 tsp or so) , some karo syrup (1/4-1/2 tsp or so) , a dash of sodium silicate (a drop or two) and then clay. Blend to a thick paste consistency. You want the clay to be the prime ingredient. The toilet paper can be 15-25% of the volume. By squeezing it, you can visualize this estimate.Before applying the paste, wet the bisque surface so it doesn't suck in the moisture from the paste too quickly.&nbsp;&nbsp;You can even re-attach broken parts using this system. Re-bisque fire the repaired piece.</font></font></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" color="#1C2837" face="arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: small;">You can cut back on water and increase both the vinegar and karo syrup.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" color="#1C2837" face="arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: small;"><br></span></font><font color="#1C2837"><font face="arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif"><font size="2">Marcia</font></font></font>

</div>

BTW, I used your method of reattchment, re bisqued and then did the glaze fire. It held during the glaze fire although because of surface differences I needed to switch to an opaque glaze. It looks pretty good and I will use the method again if needed.

#9 Riorose

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 11:50 AM

HYoly cow!!! I was just reviewing my posts and I noticed this thread had 89,000 views! I guess there are a lot of glue challenged potters out there.

#10 ~janie

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 01:58 PM

I use several types of clay, and I keep a container of paper clay from each type of clay in my studio. I love this stuff! It has simplified my life no end!

#11 flowerdry

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 09:57 PM

Hey, Mossyrock, what kind of insulation are you talking about?

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