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Duncan Gold Luster Question

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I recently started using duncan premium gold luster on some of my pieces. I'm finding that there is confusing information about the fumes, both before and during firing, and whether or not it is toxic to breathe. 

 

According to dogwoodceramics.com 

 

"Health & Safety

 

1. Overglazes contain solvents and should be used in a well-ventilated area. Those susceptible to odors (such as pregnant women) should be especially careful to work only in areas with an adequate ventilation system. During firing, odors are not dangerous but can be offensive. These odors quickly leave the area; however, you should not work in the kiln area during firing.
2. Duncan Overglazes can be used on surfaces that come into contact with food and drink. Care must be taken to avoid hard scrubbing when washing overglazed ware, because of the possibility of scraping off the thin layer of metal or luster. Treat your overglazed pieces as you would fine china. Although overglazed ware will take repeated washings in a dishwasher, the overglaze will eventually wear away.
3. Caution. Do not place pieces with metallic overglazes into a microwave oven. As with any metallic surface, they could cause sparks."

=============================

 

I apply outside, and though the smell is apparent, it is not overbearing..keep in mind I'm only accenting with the gold. Should I be wearing a mask while applying? What about during firing? I only go outside to turn the kiln up so I'm in contact with the fumes 99.9% of the time. 

 

So what are your thoughts? I've now read that the fumes are VERY dangerous and that the fumes are not dangerous.

 

Will like to hear your thoughts on this. Thanks, Casi

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I personally has some BAD issues with breathing luster carriers (even with decent ventilation and protective gear).  But each manufacturer has their own blending of that stuff.

 

Suggest you read the MSDS for the materials you use.

 

http://www.duncanpaintstore.com/nmclay-bin/shop.pl/page=msds.html/SID=1405016168.10986

 

best,

 

.........................john

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It doesn't matter what brand of gold or lustre you are using you should not be present in the same space as the kiln when you are firing these.   The toxicity of gold fumes is present till at least 450.C.  You will notice that is when the smell also disappears.   

 

You should never work in the same space as a kiln  when it is being fired.   Fumes are being emitted all the time.   

Marcia Selsor likes this

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A different issue: I want to apply lustre to stoneware. Would it fire onto a glaze that was already high fired, or would it require a layer of glaze that would fuse at a lower temperature?

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A different issue: I want to apply lustre to stoneware. Would it fire onto a glaze that was already high fired, or would it require a layer of glaze that would fuse at a lower temperature?

 

You can apply it to most any glaze.  Different base layers of glaze can affect how it "binds" a bit....... but usually not a huge concern.

 

If you fire it over VERY low temp glazes (like overglaze enamels) sometimes the enamel "softens" and you can get some interesting effects.  (I do this deliberately sometimes.)

 

best,

 

...................john

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You may find that lustre on stoneware fires better at the higher end of the lustre firing 800-820.C.    If you come across any books on lustre you will find that different firing temperatures are given for different categories of glazes.  These categories are usually glass, earthenware, soft paste porcelain, hard paste porcelain.  Stoneware falls within the hard paste porcelain range of firing temperatures whereas cone 6 glazes would fall within top end of soft paste porcelain.  Lustre relies on bismuth oxide to flux or bind to the surface of the glaze.

 

Johanna

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