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Babs

Taste And Feeling Hamada

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Does any one know where I can source this discourse of Hamada's . The article I was reading said it was written in the 1930's but did not give a title to the discourse.It referred to taste being only partial viewing and feeling as seeing the article as the whole

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http://www.art-newzealand.com/Issues1to40/books0403.htm

 

Of himself, Hamada has said that it was after reaching the age of seventy that he began to feel mature. In talking about his approach to pot-making he has commented that techniques are difficult enough to learn: '... it took me ten years to learn them but twenty years to forget them... it is the experience - how the experience is accepted - that is important... knowing things sometimes impedes the power of the observation. .. "Good taste" is a formula, but it is not so with "feeling" . . . I often wish that people would take a step further and apply non-established, non-accepted standards and select work that has the true directness of feeling, even if it is lacking in the expected taste. .. If we reflect on our motive for making pottery we can make a start without mistakes.'

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http://www.art-newzealand.com/Issues1to40/books0403.htm

 

Of himself, Hamada has said that it was after reaching the age of seventy that he began to feel mature. In talking about his approach to pot-making he has commented that techniques are difficult enough to learn: '... it took me ten years to learn them but twenty years to forget them... it is the experience - how the experience is accepted - that is important... knowing things sometimes impedes the power of the observation. .. "Good taste" is a formula, but it is not so with "feeling" . . . I often wish that people would take a step further and apply non-established, non-accepted standards and select work that has the true directness of feeling, even if it is lacking in the expected taste. .. If we reflect on our motive for making pottery we can make a start without mistakes.'

Mature at seventy Bciske my friend you may have to wait a little longer than that! :D

So it is the viewer who brings taste, and the pot which gives feeling?

Feel i could sit forever in the presence of some pots.

Zombie in the pottery

Thanks people I'll keep reading a while, too cold to pot here at mo.

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http://www.art-newzealand.com/Issues1to40/books0403.htm

 

Of himself, Hamada has said that it was after reaching the age of seventy that he began to feel mature. In talking about his approach to pot-making he has commented that techniques are difficult enough to learn: '... it took me ten years to learn them but twenty years to forget them... it is the experience - how the experience is accepted - that is important... knowing things sometimes impedes the power of the observation. .. "Good taste" is a formula, but it is not so with "feeling" . . . I often wish that people would take a step further and apply non-established, non-accepted standards and select work that has the true directness of feeling, even if it is lacking in the expected taste. .. If we reflect on our motive for making pottery we can make a start without mistakes.'

Mature at seventy Bciske my friend you may have to wait a little longer than that! :D

So it is the viewer who brings taste, and the pot which gives feeling?

Feel i could sit forever in the presence of some pots.

Zombie in the pottery

Thanks people I'll keep reading a while, too cold to pot here at mo.

 

I'm told that the potter makes vessels, not tea bowls, and that it is the tea master who chooses which vessels become tea bowls. So, yes, the pot gives feeling and the user determines function.

 

I may be a smart-ass, but I'm an old smart-ass on the downward trajectory toward maturity.

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I'm told that the potter makes vessels, not tea bowls, and that it is the tea master who chooses which vessels become tea bowls.

 

Very true. Just becasue something cursorally looks sort of like a chawan.... does not make it suitable to be a Chawan. Much goes into it both functionally and aesthetically for an actual Chakai.

 

best,

 

.........................john

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http://www.art-newzealand.com/Issues1to40/books0403.htm

 

Of himself, Hamada has said that it was after reaching the age of seventy that he began to feel mature. In talking about his approach to pot-making he has commented that techniques are difficult enough to learn: '... it took me ten years to learn them but twenty years to forget them... it is the experience - how the experience is accepted - that is important... knowing things sometimes impedes the power of the observation. .. "Good taste" is a formula, but it is not so with "feeling" . . . I often wish that people would take a step further and apply non-established, non-accepted standards and select work that has the true directness of feeling, even if it is lacking in the expected taste. .. If we reflect on our motive for making pottery we can make a start without mistakes.'

Mature at seventy Bciske my friend you may have to wait a little longer than that! :D

So it is the viewer who brings taste, and the pot which gives feeling?

Feel i could sit forever in the presence of some pots.

Zombie in the pottery

Thanks people I'll keep reading a while, too cold to pot here at mo.

 

I'm told that the potter makes vessels, not tea bowls, and that it is the tea master who chooses which vessels become tea bowls. So, yes, the pot gives feeling and the user determines function.

 

I may be a smart-ass, but I'm an old smart-ass on the downward trajectory toward maturity.

 

So  maturity is "taste" or  a feeling of the whole?  The unaccepted standard.. can it be a standard if it is unaccepted, so maybe only exists for the individual?

Trajectory? A Speeding up of the process?

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