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Ways To Sign Your Pieces?


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#1 TortoiseAvenger

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 07:10 PM

So you can take the needle tool and sign your name or initials... but to me, this often looks clunky. I'd like a more elegant solution.

 

What about having a rubber stamp made and dipping it in an oxide wash, then stamping the piece? This would be great for a logo...

 

Any other ideas?



#2 Patris

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 07:20 PM

This won't apply to most people, but I am lucky enough to have two round initials (p and o), so I use the corner of a trimming tool and make two concentric circles, then add a stem to the inner one so the p is inside the o. It's clean and stylized, and looks particularly nice when I glaze the inside of the foot ring.

#3 Benzine

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 07:21 PM

There are nearly unlimited ways to sign your wares.  You can inscribe your signature, as you mentioned.  If you don't like the look, try it when the clay is at a different dryness.  Alternately, Pres has many times stated that he uses a thin plastic bag over the clay, then signs, which prevents burs.  

 

Beyond that, many ceramicists make stamps they use to press into wet clay, sometimes along with a hand signature.  Also as you mentioned, you could stamp on a stain.  Others will sign with the stain and a brush, or even underglaze and a brush.


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#4 Min

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 09:20 PM

I had a stamp made at Jet stamps, they use acetal, a hard plastic, which makes a very crisp, burr free impression in the clay. They have a fast turnaround time and can help with design if necessary.

http://www.jetstamps.com/ 



#5 S. Dean

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 09:31 PM

I had a stamp made at Jet stamps, they use acetal, a hard plastic, which makes a very crisp, burr free impression in the clay. They have a fast turnaround time and can help with design if necessary.

http://www.jetstamps.com/ 

+1 for Brett at Jetstamps



#6 CLN studios

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 09:31 PM

If your trying to stamp on bisque with a stamp it comes out blotted and un-readable, because the oxide beads up on the rubber. But you can get a old ink pad, clean it. and saturate it with the oxide, this usualy works.



#7 Pugaboo

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 09:44 PM

I had a pewter stamp made for soft clay impressions but I also had a rubber stamp made at the same time and when I forget or can't because the piece is difficult to handle when soft enough for the pewter stamp I use the rubber one. I got an old ink stamping pad and brush underglaze on the pad and spritz with a bit of water dab my rubber stamp and stamp the piece. It works beautifully clean sharp image and fires perfectly as well.

Oh and I don't use my name to sign I use pugaboo which has been the name of my art studio for many Many years and happens to work well with Pugaboo Pottery as well. I use a little running pug as my simple rubber stamp signature design and if I can use the big pewter stamp it also has the words Pugaboo Pottery written around the running Pug.

Terry
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#8 Stellaria

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 05:11 AM

I carved a wooden stamp of a Celtic raven and use that most of the time. (Studio name is Bran Ti, which is Brythonic - precursor to Cornish and Welsh - for Raven House.) Sometimes there is no place to use it, so I sign my name with a dull pencil or iron oxide / rutile wash depending on the stage the piece is at. I'm a forgetful person :)
http://community.cer...-bran-ti-raven/

#9 Benzine

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 02:12 PM

Stell, great design for your stamp!


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#10 nicolesy

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 07:14 PM

I went fancy and use a custom stamp from http://4clay.com/.


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#11 grype

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 08:00 PM

Do you guys find that people prefer stamped signatures or carved. I am trying to decide how to sign my future pots as I get ready to start selling them. Right now I just carve my last name into the bottom. I don't particularly like it and I think I would rather stamp a symbol, however my father states that no one will know who made the pot later on if your kids pass it on or something. This has some merit but I am just not sure what I want to do. 

 

Any opinions?



#12 Babs

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 08:04 PM

If making a lot of pots tiem may become an issue, some only sign pots significant to them. Stamping may be quicker, or signing, can do it with a biro at trimming stage may sui t you. Pretty personal decision.



#13 grype

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 08:11 PM

Time is definitely an issue because my last name is Rosenblatt. Not the easiest to carve nicely. lol. Was thinking about getting a stamp made of a rose leaf or something, since that is what Rosenblatt stands for. It would be a nice little elegant stamp, maybe a rose leaf with my initials under it or something.



#14 Benzine

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 08:59 PM

Time is definitely an issue because my last name is Rosenblatt. Not the easiest to carve nicely. lol. Was thinking about getting a stamp made of a rose leaf or something, since that is what Rosenblatt stands for. It would be a nice little elegant stamp, maybe a rose leaf with my initials under it or something.

That would be interesting, though why not go with the "Piranha Plant"/ "Audrey 2" in your avatar?


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#15 grype

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 09:01 PM

 

Time is definitely an issue because my last name is Rosenblatt. Not the easiest to carve nicely. lol. Was thinking about getting a stamp made of a rose leaf or something, since that is what Rosenblatt stands for. It would be a nice little elegant stamp, maybe a rose leaf with my initials under it or something.

That would be interesting, though why not go with the "Piranha Plant"/ "Audrey 2" in your avatar?

 

LOL. I made that a while back for my niece she is big into plants vs zombies. She painted it for her birthday. That would be one interesting stamp.   :D Not even sure why its my avatar, I was just looking for a picture of something to put up and it was on my desktop.



#16 nicolesy

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 09:19 PM

LOL. I made that a while back for my niece she is big into plants vs zombies. She painted it for her birthday. That would be one interesting stamp.   :D Not even sure why its my avatar, I was just looking for a picture of something to put up and it was on my desktop.

Ha! I love it! I'm addicted to that game, too.


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#17 drmyrtle

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 08:58 AM

My glyph has a system to it that I don't expect anyone to understand. After being dissatisfied with name writing and scratching, I melded my two initials together (MW), and began making creatures out of the resultant squiggle. For each year of the rat, ox, tiger, etc. a modified creature becomes my glyph (applied with the smooth end of something handy). This way, I can tell what year it was made in, and the technique and glazes usually identify which community space I was working in at the time. It's super fast to apply.

Quirky, but fun inside story. I highly doubt art historians will care in the future ;).

#18 grype

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 08:10 PM

@ drmyrtle: That's interesting. I was thinking about making the R in my name have a leaf off it to the left. So Rosenblatt, with a leaf off the R as a stamp. But bleh, I dunno. A part of me wants to use my favorite poker hand as my stamp. 97 spades. 



#19 clayfeetpottery

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 07:08 AM

Do you all date your work?  I have been in the habit of putting the year on my pieces next to my signature.  Now, as I am gearing up to make a go at selling my pots, I wonder if dating presents a problem if you have work that doesn't sell immediately. 

Are people less likely to buy a pot made a few years ago?

 

thoughts?


-with dirty feet and happy hands,

 

   Mel

 


#20 grype

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 08:06 AM

I never thought about that. People might flip it over and see 2002 and be like WOW this has never sold and put it down. I don't have the experience to weigh in as I am just getting started but that is a super good question.






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