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Does Your Dominant Hand Dictate Form Or Are You Ambidextrous.

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#21 Joy pots

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 11:15 AM

I throw right handed but do many things left handed. Funny how you don't notice you are ambidextrous until somebody points it out. When I was small my bro always checked me if I used my left hand.
I do my first pull with the left hand out & right inside count clockwise. More strength in the left.
Joy

#22 Colby Charpentier

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 11:23 AM

A couple years of glassblowing changes everything in terms of dexterity. I can't see much dominant hand influence in form, beyond handle tilt, and other tiny nuances...

#23 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 11:48 AM

I did some glass blowing in college , but the very small set up was for right handed people. My glass chilled too much being farther away...far side of the bench from the furnace.
Dexterity in both hands seems to develop in people who work with their hands..both of them.

Marcia

#24 Benzine

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 02:20 PM

Tom,

 

There was some reason to be worried, about cutting yourself, with a tool designed for right handed folk.  My second year teaching, I was using the Medieval paper cutter in my room, to cut some thin strips for file labels.  As with most, cheap, cutters of it's type, there is a bit of a gap between the cutting arm blade, and the surface blade.  So you have to pull the arm to the left when cutting, or risk tearing the paper.  So I was doing this, and me pulling left with my right hand, caused my left hand holding the small pieces of paper to slide towards the blade....  And a crunching sound later, I had to make a ER visit.  Luckily, it was just a "fillet" cut, the Doctor's words, not mine.  But as I am a lefty, I naturally used my left hand constantly, and kept bumping the injury on things, which didn't feel great.  

So it's not just that the right handed world is against us, by having things that don't work as well for us, scissors, paper cutters, etc, but when things go wrong, it can end up hurting our dominant hand....IT'S A CONSPIRACY!!!


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#25 Pugaboo

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 05:57 PM

I agree a right handed conspiracy. REVOLUTION AND FREEDOM FOR ALL LEFTIES!!!!!!!
Why we are not considered a special minority group in need of special rights I have no idea... Bet it's that right handed conspiracy at work again trying to keep us lefties down.

Anonymous
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#26 oldlady

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 12:53 PM

you have used the propaganda yourself, pug, your special minority group does not need special "rights", you need special "LEFTS". -_-


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#27 CarlCravens

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 03:10 PM

There's dexterity and there's dexterity.  I use both my hands a lot with pottery.  When soldering circuits, the right and left hands have similar jobs (one holds solder), but I hold the iron in my right.  And I wield a hammer in my right... I can't aim for squat with my left, and my right is stronger.  When hand drumming, both hands have equal jobs... but I always lead with my right.  My handwriting is barely legible with my right hand, I can barely hold a pencil correctly in my left.

 

I could pull walls with either hand, but for trimming I want the tool in my right.  If my wheel spun clockwise, I'm sure I'd learn to trim on the left with my right hand holding the tool.


Carl (Wichita, KS)

#28 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 08:15 AM

Rt handed, wheel counter-clockwise ( an endangered term!  ;) ), left hand inside, can throw reverse (clockwise) if pressed to do so, ambidextrous to a good degree. (Former professional drummer... that helps that too.)

 

best,

 

....................john

 

Same as John here, minus the drums. For pulling up: left hand inside. For bellying out: right hand inside. Ambidextrous because I was a piano teacher way back when....

 

Evelyne


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#29 TJR

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 10:00 AM

Here's another left-handed injustice. When I go to pay for something with my credit card, or bank card, the shield is ON THE LEFT SIDE!.I then have to work around a stupid shield that is designed to hide my data!.

Ben;

On those paper cutters- in Australia, they have a big roller that slides along, not a 3 ft knife that comes down. Great design.

Happy filleting.

T.



#30 Benzine

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 11:24 AM

Tom,

 

One of the worst "Biases" against the "Lefty World", that I encountered was the college lecture halls.  Many of the halls at my university had desktops that folded/ turned down and fit in the gaps between each seat.  That way, you didn't have to squeeze into the chair, when you sat down.  Most of these desktops were on the right side of the chair.  The only left handed desks, were on the left side of the aisle However, since they hung on the outside of the aisle, many of them were snagged by people and their bags as they walked by, breaking them off.  The maintenance department was in no hurry to fix them either.  Beyond that, some no-left handed students would sit in these seats, so they could leave the room quicker and easier.

In either case, lefty folk were left to use the right handed desks, twisting awkwardly to the right, to use the tiny, tiny desk surface.

 

I've seen the roller cutters Tom.  They have them in the supply catalogs I use.  They just tend to be more pricey.  I bought one for my darkroom a couple years ago.  Originally, I had a small standard cutter in there, with a dull blade, and a broken spring.  So the arm wouldn't stay up.  So, when positioning the paper, the blade arm was rested on my shoulder...Very safe right!  This new one, has a sharp blade, and a secondary arm, with a flat rubber surface, that holds the paper, so it doesn't shift when cutting.  Because of this, you don't have to have your hand anywhere near the blade.  It's much safe, especially as I am cutting via dim safe light.


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#31 Babs

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 03:04 AM

YOu guys, the Person who designed chain saws was a leftie I am sure!

The pull start is on the left hand side of the machine. This makes it really difficult for  right hand people to generate the power required to start the saw.

Of course after starting it, you are more likely to cut your left leg off but you'd be right legged?? So no big deal.



#32 Pugaboo

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 09:32 PM

Shhhhh that's our secret revenge we're hoping all you righties will wander out into the woods start up your chainsaws and never return. We shall just shake our heads and say, "Well if only they had taken the time to learn with their other hand like us "normal" people." Then sadly turn away to hide the grin on our faces that we are now the majority and can finally design a decent pair of scissors, move all those attached pens at the bank to the other side, remove those awful pencil sharpeners from schools, make cars have the key on the other side, set computer mouses on the right track and never again be embarrassed when somebody says you are writing in the spiral notebook backwards!
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#33 Babs

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 01:26 AM

come to Oz we drive on your side, something to do with being upside down.

You could just turn your notebook upside down too!



#34 clay lover

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 07:20 AM

To confuse this question even further, if you are turning the wheel counter clock wise, which SIDE of the bat are your hands on.  Are they at 3 o'clock or 9 o'clock?  And which is inside?

I'm a leftie, and my body prefers flexing left, so that determined how I throw. more than the handedness, I think.  Both hands have to work, but I had an easier time getting clay to go up, not out because my dominant left hand is on the outside.



#35 Stellaria

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 07:46 AM

Wouldn't you have to have left hand inside, right hand outside, at 3:00 regardless of handedness? To keep from jamming fingertips into the clay?
If you wanted to switch to 9:00 and have the right hand inside, the wheel would need to go clockwise, right?
Hands at about 6:00 would work either way, though, wouldn't it?

#36 clay lover

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 08:39 AM

My thought is that the clay must run from your palm through your fingers when throwing, pulling a wall up, , So clockwise would determine hands on left of clay with right hand in  and reverse for counter clock wise.



#37 Stellaria

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 09:55 AM

That's what I thought. Otherwise you'd always be fighting with the tendency to gouge into the clay with your fingertips because the clay would be turning toward them, not away from them.

#38 Idaho Potter

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 07:43 PM

Right hand outside left inside, wheel turning counter-clockwise.  Until I had a 14 year old student who could not handle those positions.  Spent several hours teaching myself to throw left hand outside, right hand inside, wheel turning clockwise.

 

 For the most part my left hand & arm are just there for balance when walking. Although when right hand was out of commission for most of a year, the left hand signed checks for bills.  The signature was on a par with fourth grade attempts at cursive writing.  The bank didn't care.

 

Shirley



#39 Mark C.

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 12:02 AM

Since the beginning of me I have been a right hander-Since 69 I have used my left hand inside and right outside.

Since my PRC wrist surgery almost 3 years ago(the 1st 3 bones removed in wrist) I have become much more left handed as my right wrist  needs to be babied or so said my surgeon. The alternative is a fuzed wrist which I'm told may happen anyway over time. So I stopped hammering and bought a power wedger.

I use my left for heavy stuff and do very little wedging anymore.I still struggle to hit a nail with the left hand but am getting good at lifting with it.

I have some other heavy interests and am using my left hand as much as I can.

My right wrist is always just a little not happy.

Throwing seems to have no effect on it but moving a ton of clay makes it sore as does kiln loading and lifting lots of stuff (which describes my life well as a potter).

I am slowing learning to be more lefty I will try TJR's advice and use a spoon with the left hand but the spoon idea works better when you are 2 years old I think.

Mark


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#40 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 12:19 PM

Tom,

 

One of the worst "Biases" against the "Lefty World", that I encountered was the college lecture halls.  Many of the halls at my university had desktops that folded/ turned down and fit in the gaps between each seat.  That way, you didn't have to squeeze into the chair, when you sat down.  Most of these desktops were on the right side of the chair.  The only left handed desks, were on the left side of the aisle However, since they hung on the outside of the aisle, many of them were snagged by people and their bags as they walked by, breaking them off.  The maintenance department was in no hurry to fix them either.  Beyond that, some no-left handed students would sit in these seats, so they could leave the room quicker and easier.

In either case, lefty folk were left to use the right handed desks, twisting awkwardly to the right, to use the tiny, tiny desk surface.

 

I've seen the roller cutters Tom.  They have them in the supply catalogs I use.  They just tend to be more pricey.  I bought one for my darkroom a couple years ago.  Originally, I had a small standard cutter in there, with a dull blade, and a broken spring.  So the arm wouldn't stay up.  So, when positioning the paper, the blade arm was rested on my shoulder...Very safe right!  This new one, has a sharp blade, and a secondary arm, with a flat rubber surface, that holds the paper, so it doesn't shift when cutting.  Because of this, you don't have to have your hand anywhere near the blade.  It's much safe, especially as I am cutting via dim safe light.

I forgot all about these desks!!!  I am left handed with writing and drawing but cutting and crochet is right handed.  My left hand is on the inside of the pot when throwing.  (is that normal? I never compared)  The worst thing ever invented for lefties is 3 ring binders.... No wonder I have to write with a twisted wrist, I have been conditioned to avoid spiral notebooks and large rings.  Not to mention the black hand from drawing... yikes! 


Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)





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