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I was experimenting with some Hakame and made a brush from grass broom bristles which seems to be fine as far as the tool is concerned (the synthetic broom bristles might be an interesting alternative too as you could space them out and create a "comb"). The issue that I ran into is that instead of doing it with slip I am doing it with glaze. It turned out pretty interesting but I'm not getting the flow that I want which is in the second photo. Any tips on getting that type of flow? The color pallate that I"m working with is exactly what I want and using another slip I might consider eventually but I'm trying to stick with working with minimal amount of variables at this time.

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I think slip is probably a good way to go but you could try getting a flexible hair lice comb or serrated rib and going over your brush strokes to try and remove more of the glaze and define the lines.

 

Is the bowl unglazed besides your brush strokes?

 

My profile picture is just my usual clay coloured blue with a matt white over the top once it has been bisque. Using a stiffer brush and changing when you apply it, either while still on the wheel to leather hard will give different lines.

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With glaze, you'll want one that is "stiff" or "fat" . . . one that stays in place and doesn't move when melting. The second bowl seems more shallow than the first picture; gravity will come into play. It also looks like your glaze melts and flows easily at temperature. Perhaps for the hakeme decoration you'll want a more matte or semi matte glaze that does not melt completely and stays in place. Another key is how the two glazes interact; the first picture seems to show the two glazes melting together nicely, probably because they are similar in composition; two glazes with the same base recipe are not likely to work well. You don't have that happening in the second picture.

 

As for getting the flow, you'll need to practice on paper. Loading a hakeme brush made of broom bristles is far different than loading a brush of animal hair. Also experiment with different viscosities of glaze . . . thick glaze vs. thinned glaze. Once you find you can get the effect you want on paper, move on to your pottery.

Karen B, Babs, Chantay and 1 other like this

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