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Tips & Tricks


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#1 Min

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 11:38 AM

It's been a while since we have had a tips and tricks posting and it's seems to be a bit quiet on the forums so anybody have anything new to share?

 

I've got this one: for pots that have gotten to dry to cut the rims of or attach handles to, wet cheesecloth works really well. I dip the cheesecloth in water then squeeze out the excess and drape 2 or 3 pieces on the area of the pot that needs to be softer. For fairly thin pieces it takes about 15 minutes and the clay is soft enough to work again. For thicker pieces I re-wet the cheesecloth and reapply. This works much better for me than misting or dipping the pot in water.



#2 Babs

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 07:40 PM

Stolen from a ceramics vintage mag, tip from Ivan Englund, for an interesting variation, pull your pot as normal and then on the last pull, and shaping of the pot instead of water or slurry, use  a glaze, he stated a raw glaze but any glaze with 20 - 30 % clay would do the job or poss any glaze. Haven't tried this but I have a few glazes from years ago lurking in a bucket or two so I will give it a go soon. Depending on the effect after bisquing, glazed interior only?/



#3 Pres

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 09:37 PM

On throwing larger, try pulling normal, then after beginning cylinder pull top third, then middle third then bottom third of pot. This allows me to often get taller and thinner forms.


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#4 John Hertzfeld

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 11:51 PM

I put a little peppermint extract in my spray bottle freshens up the air as I work

#5 Denice

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 08:25 AM

This is a tip for disabled or older potters, since developing MS unloading or loading the kiln wears me out.  On bisque firings I start filling the kiln as the work gets dry, it also protect your work at that fragile state if you work in tight spaces.  Unloading I just take my time or get help from visitors who are glad to get in on the fun. Denice



#6 Chantay

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 05:26 PM

Denice, good tip.  I started doing this as too many things were getting bumped and damaged while waiting for enough to fill the kiln.  Also, I know right away when the kiln is full. 

 

I recently started using soy wax.  The kind made for candle making.  I really like it.  Easy to get a very smooth, straight line when applied with a foam brush.  I have to credit Mea, Good Elephant, for this tip.


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#7 clay lover

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 08:23 AM

Sham-WOW works really well for all sorts of damp clean up from work surfaces to wiping extra glaze off pots.  Hold water without dripping, very absorbent.



#8 Karen B

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 12:47 PM

If you have to flip a large thin slab that is rolled out on canvas, slide the canvas onto a large piece of insulating foam "PolarGuard" and put another over the slab. The foam adds no weight and is strong, then you can flip and peel the canvas off without disturbing the slab.



#9 Denice

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 08:49 PM

Karen great tip the slab plus the weight of the sheet rock I flip it on is getting to be to heavy for me.  How thick of Tyvek foam do you use?    Denice



#10 Karen B

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 11:53 PM

Hi Denice, I have some that is 1" thick. So plenty sturdy, and practically weightless. It came as packing in something I ordered. I am lucky that I have 2 big pieces that are the same size. It actually is polystyrene insulation and comes in sheets that are 2' x 8'.

 

I edited this post and my previous post for accuracy. So sorry I relied on faulty memory initially.



#11 synj00

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 03:23 PM

Instead of chamoi cloth for rims I use a cheap cloth for cleaning reading glasses. One cloth should last like a year as I only use strips.

 

Another trick I used the other day to apply a stone-like texture to some pinch pots was to use a wash cloth over a foam ball and push the clay with the outer layer to form. Then unwrap the clay carefully not to rip and out comes this beautifully textured vessel.


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