Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Marcia Selsor

What Is The Most Dangerous Thing In Your Studio?

Recommended Posts

Me,

I take a deep breath and have a good heart to heart with myself, sometimes it works :)

Seriously, making unwarranted assumptions, such as "I know I turned the power off" before working on something. Everything is at a state of rest until we interact with it, snakes excluded

 

I'm closer to building a smaller kiln to test some of those cone 6 reduction glazes I've seen of yours. That copper red mug in Micheal Baily's book looks very inviting. How close is the color photo to the piece itself?

Wyndham

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree with W and J, Some days more than others!

With GEP on the dust on the floor.

My space is verboten to others because of the above dangers and more.

Possums aare another danger, even clumsier than me.So glass jars of ingredients are no more,plastic screwe ons are the wat to go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am currently building a big ass Franken -kickwheel out of two old woodframe wheels. The flywheel is a 100 lb piece of metal with a shaft sticking out. I believe if you ran hard enough from one end of the studio to the other and landed on it, you could gut yourself.I have a bucket on the shaft. Don't worry, I'll finish it. I think it is missing a few pieces.

Don't say that I am missing a few pieces. We already know that.

Tom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I believe if you ran hard enough from one end of the studio to the other and landed on it, you could gut yourself.I have a bucket on the shaft. Don't worry, I'll finish it. I think it is missing a few pieces.

Don't say that I am missing a few pieces. We already know that.

Tom.

Try not to think of this too much! Is the bucket to keep the blood off the floor in case you slide after the impaling Sorry about the pun? Might need to be a brit to get that one..

Too funny TJR :D  :D  :D

TJR likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Me,

I take a deep breath and have a good heart to heart with myself, sometimes it works :)

Seriously, making unwarranted assumptions, such as "I know I turned the power off" before working on something. Everything is at a state of rest until we interact with it, snakes excluded

 

I'm closer to building a smaller kiln to test some of those cone 6 reduction glazes I've seen of yours. That copper red mug in Micheal Baily's book looks very inviting. How close is the color photo to the piece itself?

Wyndham

Yes, that copper red is an accurate color, at least in my copy of the book.

Writing from my workshop in Italy.

Marcia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 I believe if you ran hard enough from one end of the studio to the other and landed on it, you could gut yourself.I have a bucket on the shaft. Don't worry, I'll finish it. I think it is missing a few pieces.

Don't say that I am missing a few pieces. We already know that.

Tom.

Try not to think of this too much! Is the bucket to keep the blood off the floor in case you slide after the impaling Sorry about the pun? Might need to be a brit to get that one..

Too funny TJR :D  :D  :D

 

Shouldn't the word be impailing?

TJR.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not allowed open flame or sharp objects! My studio is concrete block for a good reason!

  Standing up on kick wheel in motion is a good reality check.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess 'me' wins! I did wonder about how the set up May avoid traps or accidents.

 

My best defence against myself is knowing my physical and mental limitations on any given day.  When I'm too frantic and eager to get things done or reluctant to work on a project, I find I'm prone to more accidents.  So if I'm not in a good mood or if I'm not quite awake enough, I do something else, there's never nothing to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 I believe if you ran hard enough from one end of the studio to the other and landed on it, you could gut yourself.I have a bucket on the shaft. Don't worry, I'll finish it. I think it is missing a few pieces.

Don't say that I am missing a few pieces. We already know that.

Tom.

Try not to think of this too much! Is the bucket to keep the blood off the floor in case you slide after the impaling Sorry about the pun? Might need to be a brit to get that one..

Too funny TJR :D  :D  :D

 

Shouldn't the word be impailing?

TJR.

 

Only with Canadian spelling!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 I believe if you ran hard enough from one end of the studio to the other and landed on it, you could gut yourself.I have a bucket on the shaft. Don't worry, I'll finish it. I think it is missing a few pieces.

Don't say that I am missing a few pieces. We already know that.

Tom.

Try not to think of this too much! Is the bucket to keep the blood off the floor in case you slide after the impaling Sorry about the pun? Might need to be a brit to get that one..

Too funny TJR :D  :D  :D

 

Shouldn't the word be impailing?

TJR.

 

Only with Canadian spelling!

 

Babs;

You and I both know that Australian spelling and Canadian spelling are the same.

T.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fall in the 98% category as I am the most dangerous tool in my studio, not only to myself, but to others. Thank goodness I am usually alone. Some days I am stumbling around with vertigo, other days with dizziness from the Niaspin I take. Soft hands from being in water a lot get cut easily, shins get bruised and it seems like my genetic make up makes me a bleeder with thin fragile skin. There are weeks where I am constantly scarred up. But you know, I love the clay, so it is what it is. Sometimes we have a price to pay. Good thing about genetics though, my Dad similar to I in almost every way(except for politics) just drove his 33' motor home pulling a car back from Florida last month. He is 87 and still going strong. I tell him you lead and I'll follow. (I hope) :rolleyes:

Babs and Chilly like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of the things I use for pottery... probably the flexible stainless steel rib of death.  It's the only pottery tool I've cut myself on.  I hates it, but even the red Mudtools ribs don't quite do the same job.

 

That can't really do a lot of damage, though.  The bench grinder (used to shape and sharpen trim tools) could put an eye out if a grinding wheel shattered.   (Stand to the side during startup, wear a face shield.)

 

If we include everything in the shop, my table saw is probably the most dangerous in terms of serious injury.

 

I don't think I'm all that dangerous.  I used to work professionally in machine and tooling shops, and I have a lot of respect for stuff that can hurt me, both short term and long term.  I have safety rituals for using power equipment, I always unplug power equipment immediately when I'm done with it.  I wear safety glasses, face shields, know when not to wear gloves, etc.  I make a living with my hands and eyes, and I put a great deal of value on them, and I practically treat tools like they're out to get me.  (The worst injury I sustained in a machine shop was from the pop machine, which had lost it's catch basket years before... everyone knew you had to catch the glass bottle on the way out.  And I did.  And my reflexes tried to catch the second bottle that unexpectedly followed it... I reached it just as it hit the concrete.)

ChenowethArts likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most dangerous things: The particulate mask that doesn't get worn everytime I spray...and the room exhaust fan that doesn't always get turned on when the booth is running.  Also, my feet are absolute magnets for pointy things like needle tools and xacto blades.

-Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×