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tcermak84

Self Hardening Clay For Sculpture?

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I don't have a kiln as of yet or a place where I can rent space.

To get my toes wet I figured i'd try some of the self hardening clay for sculpting some busts.

Is this not advisable? I haven't worked with them before so any input is highly appreciated.

 

Thanks,

 

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I have only used it once, as a class requirement to use it in making a sculpture. It was nothing like using regular clay. Perhaps I just got a bad box, but I hated it.

 

If your goal is to gain proficiency in making clay sculpture, go with real clay. Even if you cannot fire it, you will be gaining experience.

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I have only used it once, as a class requirement to use it in making a sculpture. It was nothing like using regular clay. Perhaps I just got a bad box, but I hated it.

 

If your goal is to gain proficiency in making clay sculpture, go with real clay. Even if you cannot fire it, you will be gaining experience.

+1.  It was weird to work with, you couldn't "weld" it together, slip and score wasn't successful.  Used it before clay, at home, when I went to a real pottery class the difference was amazing.

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Hi

 

A better choice would be raku or sculpture paperclay mix from a ceramics supplier which will be strong enough if built on a wooden batt and not moved off it

......or get some dried out clay add 50/50 paper pulp or (clean!) recycled paper cat litter, add into hot water and mix with drill and paint mixer.  Next morning knead and wedge the mass before using.

 

Both these paperclay mixes can be quite strong if not moved too often and can be fired later when you have access to a kiln, or if you don't like them they can be slaked down in hot water again for reuse another time.

 

Self hardening clay does not behave like real clay and you will not learn appropriate ceramics skills trying to use it.

 

best of luck,

Irene

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pieces made with real clay can last for a very long time without being fired  I have a friend who made a combination chicken and bull about 10 years ago.  it has oxidized, turned dark instead of grey like it was when made, but it is still on her shelf in the studio.  she hasn't decided to fire "bullfeathers" yet.  kept dry, clay lasts.

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Ok. All of that sounds good. My only experience is in regular clay. I just wasn't sure how long I could let it sit before I had a way to fire it. Sounds like my best bet is finding a place to pick up some regular clay and going crazy :)

 

I haven't had practice in almost 10 years so my knowledge as far as cones, firing, and everything else is a little out of whack and forgotten. Lots of studying ahead of myself on all the topics so I don't mess up! 

 

I just have had a strong incredible urge to get my hands dirty for the last few weeks and have trouble for some reason finding reasonable places in the area to take classes. Cheapest I found was 300 for 5 sessions. Not including clay. Seemed expensive though since i've been out of the loop for some years i can't tell.

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